Archives for December 2013

Talbot Library Events

On Tuesday, January 14, from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m., the Easton branch of the Talbot County Free Library will offer a drop-in program exclusively for teens on the art of the cookie.  Participants will learn how to paint, decorate, or otherwise embellish edible sugar cookies.  Who knows, one of them might win the “People’s Choice Award!”  All library programs are free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register for this program.  For more information, call the library at 410-822-1626, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Chris Eareckson, telephone: 410-822-1626

 

Holocaust Survivor to Speak at Library

On Monday, January 6, at 6:30 p.m., in the Easton branch of the Talbot County Free Library, Martin Weiss, a survivor of the Auschwitz and Mauthausen concentration camps, will share his memories of the horrors and heroism of the Holocaust.   Mr. Weiss is a docent at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.  The following information about his experiences during World War II is quoted from the museum’s website:

“Martin (Marty) Weiss was born on January 28, 1929 in Polana, Czechoslovakia to Jacob and Golda Weiss.  Jacob was a subsistence farmer and a meat distributor, and Golda managed their orthodox Jewish household and raised their nine children.  Czechoslovakia had become an independent democracy after World War I, and the Weiss family were proud citizens of the newly-formed nation.

“In 1939, Nazi Germany occupied Czechoslovakia and divided the country into sections of Nazi control and Hungarian control.  Marty’s home town was put under Hungarian control, but was still subjected to many of Hitler’s Nuremberg Laws.  Jews lost their equal rights as Czech citizens, and Jewish children were no longer allowed to attend public schools or universities.  Thousands of Jewish men, including Marty’s two brothers, were conscripted into slave labor battalions and sent to the Russian front.  Although most Jewish businesses were confiscated, Jacob Weiss managed to retain his business license and continued to earn money by illegally butchering their animals at night and selling the meat on the black market.

“Between 1940 and 1944, eyewitness accounts of mass killings in Poland and Ukraine made their way to Polana.  In April 1944, hundreds of thousands of Hungarian Jews, including the Weisses, were arrested and deported to the Munkacs Ghetto.  They were forced to perform slave labor in a brick factory moving bricks by hand from one side of the factory to the other.  Over a two-month period beginning in May 1944, nearly 440,000 Jews were deported from Hungary to Auschwitz-Birkenau, including Marty and his family.  Marty, his brother Moshe, his sister Cilia, their father Jacob, and two uncles were selected for slave labor.  The rest of their family was killed upon arrival.

“After a brief stay at Auschwitz-Birkenau, Marty and his father, Jacob, were transported to Melk, a subcamp of the Mauthausen concentration camp in Austria.  In Melk, the prisoners were forced to carve tunnels into the sides of mountains; Marty’s father died from exhaustion and starvation.  As the Allies advanced into Germany in the spring of 1945, Marty and other inmates went on a forced march to Gunskirchen, another sub-camp of Mauthausen, from where he was liberated by the United States Army on May 5th, 1945.”

All library programs are free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register for this program.  For more information, call the library at 410-822-1626, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Bill Peak, telephone: 410-822-1626.

 

Author to Discuss JFK Book at Library

John Shaw

John Shaw

On Thursday, January 9, at 6:00 p.m., in the Easton branch of the Talbot County Free Library,  Congressional reporter and author John T. Shaw will explain how John F. Kennedy used the Senate as a policy and political training ground to help him become only the second person in history to go directly from the Senate to the White House.  Shaw is a congressional reporter with Market News International and a contributing writer for “The Washington Diplomat” magazine.  He lives in Washington, D.C., and on Tilghman Island.   Shaw will sign copies of his new book “JFK in the Senate: Pathway to the Presidency” at the conclusion of his presentation.  All library programs are free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register for this program.  For more information, call the library at 410-822-1626, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Sabine Simonson, telephone: 410-822-1626.

 

St. Michaels Library to Offer Color Foundation Program for Artists

On successive Wednesdays, January 8 – February 19, from 10:30 a.m. to noon, the St. Michaels branch of the Talbot County Free Library will offer “Color Foundation for the Painter: A Video Course on Color with Stephen Quiller.”  Artists are invited to bring their own materials and follow along or just watch the presentation.  All library programs are free and open to the public but patrons are asked to pre-register for this program.  For more information, call the library at 410-745-5877, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Shauna Beulah, telephone: 410-745-5877

 

 

 

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Empty Bowls Community Dinner Set for February 23

Suzi  Peel, Karen Baker and Jerry Sweeney enjoying the 2013 Empty Bowls Community Dinner. (Enjoying the Dinner)

Suzi Peel, Karen Baker and Jerry Sweeney enjoying the 2013 Empty Bowls Community Dinner. (Enjoying the Dinner)

The 6th annual Empty Bowls community dinner to benefit Talbot County food pantries will be held Sunday, Feb. 23, 2014, from 5 p.m. to 7 pm.  Presented by Empty Bowls, Talbot County the goal of the dinner, in the words of co-chair Anna Harding, “Is to recognize the very serious problem of hunger in our community and then find a way to help alleviate it on a local basis.”

In case of inclement weather the event will be held March 2. Tickets go on sale January 6, 2014.
Community support for the dinner continues to grow. The event has sold out for the past three years.  Last year over 220 people were served and the event raised a record- breaking $10,000. Since it began the event has raised over $36,000. All the money from ticket sales goes to the food pantries. The soups, bread, butter, desserts, flowers, music and printing are all donated by local individual and businesses. It is planned and staffed by volunteers.

Excited guests select their bowls and eagerly await the start of the dinner.

Excited guests select their bowls and eagerly await the start of the dinner.

Tickets must be bought in advance and can be purchased by mailing a check for $20 per person to the Mid-Shore Community Foundation, 102 E. Dover Street, Easton, MD 21601. Checks should be made payable to Mid-Shore/Empty Bowls.  A phone number should be included. Tickets can also be purchased at www.mscf.org. Then click on the “events” button at the bottom of the page. Donations can also be made either by check or on-line.
The dinner is held at Immanuel Lutheran Church Hall 7215 Ocean Gateway, Easton, MD 21601 (on the westbound lane of Rt. 50, west of the Maryland State Police barracks).
For the price of the ticket, dinner guests choose a bowl (to keep) from the hundreds that have been painted at Clay Bakers, donated by local potters, or, new this year, bowls made and decorated by art students  from Easton High School, St. Michaels Middle-High School and Easton Middle School.  The bowl selection process is a very special part of the event. With so many bowls to choose from, it’s not easy finding the perfect one!  Often people come looking for the bowl they or their family and friends have created. Once chosen, the bowl will be filled with soup from a wide selection of soups and chili (including vegetarian options).  Guests are welcome to enjoy unlimited servings.  Bread, cider and dessert round out the meal.
The cornerstone of this grassroots effort is the volunteers.  This includes the 25-30 generous soup makers affectionately called “soupers”.  Masterfully coordinated by souper-visor Susan Wilford, many of them have participated in every dinner. On the day of the event they parade into the venue bearing crock pots and tureens of steaming soups and chilis. Susan says “I love to participate because it fulfills my desire to be of service to the community. And, it has allowed me to meet so many new and incredibly generous people. Every year I contact the previous year’s soup makers and give them the opportunity to bow out. They rarely do.”  Local restaurants are also joining in the effort.  Last year Bartlett Pear restaurant contributed soup. This year it looks like the number of participating restaurants will increase at least eightfold.
An equally generous batch of volunteer bakers provide the dessert. Other volunteers, including high school students, handle the setting up and putting away of tables, chairs, decorations, bowls and all the accoutrements as well as hosting and serving at the dinner.
The proceeds from the dinner go entirely to local food pantries. This past spring members of the Empty Bowls committee personally delivered checks from the dinner’s proceeds to the pantries.  It brought home, yet again, both the need for the pantries and the dedication and innovation of those who volunteer at them.  At the Presbyterian Church pantry, we spoke with pantry volunteers Caroline Sproule and Mary Beth Goll, two of the 11 Mission Committee members that oversee the pantry. They said the pantry typically feeds 60-70 families a month and that the mission of the Mission Committee is to “Help those in need help themselves.” In keeping with the mission, a community run vegetable garden is underway.  Most of the 20 beds have been built and they expect to have church neighbors planting this spring.
After the dinner, pots that once held soup now clean and waiting to be reunited with the cooks that brought them

After the dinner, pots that once held soup now clean and waiting to be reunited with the cooks that brought them

The magnitude of the need the pantries serve may be surprising to many in the community. The Neighborhood Service Center is another of  the participating pantries. It serves about 300 families per month, each family representing from one to 10 people.  One of the center’s clients had this to say about the value of the service it provides: “This helps because of how food stamps and other benefits are being cut and by being a single veteran over 50 this really helps to supplement the benefits it makes it where you don’t always worry about your next meal. Thank you very much.”

 It is comments like these that prompted the event organizers to think about how they could raise more funds for the pantries. After all, only so much money could be raised from the dinner itself.  Co-chair Susan duPont said, “We need to think of ways that we can expand the event without losing the intimacy of the dinner and the community spirit.”   So, this year Empty Bowls is introducing a range of sponsorship opportunities.  “In the past we were fortunate to have a limited number of generous sponsors but this year we are making a concerted effort to increase that number,” said duPont.  Sponsorships start at $250 and increase from there.  Sponsors receive acknowledgement at the dinner and in other event materials.  As of December sponsors at the Dutch Oven Level ($1,000+) are Curry Wilford, senior vice president and financial advisor at Morgan Stanley, and Steven T. Hamblin. Sponsors at the Cup of Soup level ($250+) are the Easton Ruritan Club, Sherwood Ford of Salisbury, Wye Financial &Trust,  and Mr. and Mrs. J. Scott Wimbrow.  For information about sponsorship opportunities contact Susan duPont at susan.handy.dupont@gmail.com.
 Long-time Empty Bowls collaborator, Clay Bakers in Easton, is again supporting Empty Bowls by sponsoring special bowl decorating.  StartingJan. 1 and running through Feb. 18, 2014, for a price as low as $12, Clay Bakers’ customers can choose from a selection of bowls, which they paint in their own style. Talbot County Empty Bowls receives the decorated bowl and a portion of the fee. Bowl decorating groups of 10 or more can make an advance reservation. Clay Bakers is at 1 S. Washington Street in Easton. For more information, call 410-770-9091.
 Food pantries at Asbury Methodist Church, Scott’s United Methodist Church, St. Vincent de Paul Society, Neighborhood Service Center, Presbyterian Church, and the St. Michaels Food Pantry, among others, share the proceeds from the dinner.
 The Talbot County Empty Bowls event is modeled after the first fundraiser, the brainchild of John Hartom, a North Carolina high school art teacher. In 1990, Hartom challenged his art students to make enough ceramic bowls to host a meal for the school faculty. During the meal, Hartom and his wife, Lisa Blackburn, also an art educator, reminded the group that, even though they were not hungry because they had just eaten, many in the community still had empty bowls.
 The guests were invited to keep their soup bowls as a reminder of those less fortunate. This event evolved into the non-profit organization Empty Bowls, which now raises millions of dollars for hunger-related causes around the world. Co-chair Harding  states, “Our hope is that the bowl will remind you that someone else’s bowl is often empty and that you will be moved to continue to support  those organizations who are working every day to feed those in need in throughout Talbot  County.”

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CBF Finds Fed Falling Short in Pollution Committments

A Chesapeake Bay Foundation (CBF) review of the federal government’s 2014-15 draft milestones and other recent actions has determined the federal government is falling short in its commitments to expand forest buffers, rein in air pollution, and comply with the Clean Water Act when approving permits to reduce stormwater pollution from urban/suburban runoff.

“While the Clean Water Blueprint is successfully reducing pollution from some sources, federal efforts in key areas are falling short,” said CBF Senior Water Quality Scientist Beth McGee. “Of even more concern is that important actions to achieve those commitments have not been included in the next two-year milestones. One of the things that distinguishes current efforts from past efforts that fell far short of the mark are these clear and transparent short-term commitments.”

President Obama’s Executive Order in 2009 required the federal government to develop and implement two-year milestones to support state pollution reduction efforts.

All the major Bay states rely heavily on forest buffers to achieve their water quality goals. In fact, according to the Chesapeake Bay Program, these buffers are the second most important practice to reduce nitrogen pollution. State pollution reduction plans call for roughly an additional 185,000 acres of forest buffers by 2025, an average increase of 14,200 acres per year. Implementation progress in 2012 was roughly an additional 2,600 acres. This is less than 20 percent of the amount needed annually, and one of the lowest acreage gains since the late 1990s.

Funding for buffers, and the technical assistance to implement them, comes primarily from the Farm Bill. The 2008 Farm Bill prioritized buffer planting and provided additional assistance to the region’s farmers. Much of that funding expired this fall when Congress failed to pass an extension of the legislation.

“The lack of progress toward forest buffer goals is alarming given the importance of this practice to achieving clean water,” CBF’s McGee said. “Bay Program staff are aware of the shortfall and CBF calls on USDA to include milestone commitments that will accelerate implementation of forest buffers in the Bay states.”

As part of the Clean Water Blueprint, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) committed to reducing nitrogen pollution from the air by an estimated three million pounds. That reduction was expected to be achieved by air pollution regulations that have now been tied up in court for years. And those regulations only cover coal-fired power plants.

Federal courts have ruled that sources of air pollution that are known to directly discharge pollutants into waters of the United States can be regulated not just under the Clean Air Act, but under the Clean Water Act as well. CBF is calling on EPA to utilize its current authority to do just that. In addition to coal plants, major polluters like asphalt plants, cement kilns, and pulp and paper manufacturers within the Chesapeake Bay airshed could be forced to reduce pollution damaging local rivers, streams, and the Chesapeake Bay.

Finally, CBF and the Choose Clean Water Coalition are concerned that many permits that reduce polluted runoff from urban and suburban areas are failing to comply with the Clean Water Act. They fail to set deadlines and regular benchmarks for reducing pollution from runoff, fail to promote the kinds of runoff control practices that would best protect water quality in the rivers and streams the runoff enters, and fail to require adequate monitoring of results. EPA is responsible for final review and approval of these permits.

In Montgomery County, MD, a judge found that although “the permit must include requirements needed to meet water quality standards,” the permit issued by Maryland Department of the Environment “lacks ascertainable metrics for meeting water quality standards that can either be met or not met,” and insisted that “specific requirements for meeting water quality standards must be stated in the permit.”

In Arlington, VA, since no chemical monitoring is required, the monitoring requirements in the permit are insufficient to properly identify how much pollution is entering local waterways, and to assure that pollution limits are being complied with.

In Pennsylvania, which has permits that don’t explain the kinds of implementation plans that are expected of localities, EPA has not exerted its authority sufficiently to ensure transparency and accountability, and that pollution is reduced and deadlines are met.

“Restoring local rivers, streams, and the Chesapeake Bay will only be achieved when all the partners do their fair share,” McGee said. “The federal government must step up its oversight and clearly define the actions it will take over the next two years to ensure progress. Meeting the milestones will not just benefit us today, but also our children and future generations.”

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Evergreen Center Schedule Through March 2014

Healing meditation group, with facilitator Penny Hadaway
1/5/2013, SUNDAY 1:30-3:00 p  Donations Welcome
Sunday meeting in Preston at Chesapeake NLP and Hypnosis, 136 Lednum Avenue Ste 2 Preston MD 21655; (410) 310-9992
Healing Meditations are designed to nourish your spirit and your being. Each month a different meditation will be presented, using guided exercises to .promote mental acuity, emotional health, physical health and well-being. The meditations vary from focusing inward to using meditative awareness in daily activities such as walking, driving or eating.  Penny Hadaway is a certified neurolinguist and, hypnotist. She worked In behavioral health for 26 years, establishing Chesapeake NLP and Hypnosis in 2005.

Healing meditation group, with Penny Hadaway
1/7/2013 MONDAY 6:30-8:00 pm Donations Welcome (At Evergreen A Center for Balanced Living 410-819-3395) Healing Meditations are designed to nourish your spirit and your being. Each month a different meditation will be presented, using guided exercises to .promote mental acuity, emotional health, physical health and well-being. The meditations vary from focusing inward to using meditative awareness in daily activities such as walking, driving or eating.  Penny Hadaway is a certified neurolinguist and, hypnotist. She worked In behavioral health for 26 years, establishing Chesapeake NLP and Hypnosis in 2005.

5 Elements Yoga  with S. D. Swan and Freya Farley
2nd & 4th THURSDAYS 1/9 & 23; 2/13 & 27; 3/13 & 27; 4/10 & 24, 12:30-2:00p
Member: $132 Nonmember: $142; (materials included)
This unique 5 Element Yoga program is designed to support the biological and energetic shifts we experience during seasonal changes.  Breathing, Stretching, and Tonification Practices as well as Chakra Energizing and Sense Nourishment specific to each season help to balance the nervous and endocrine systems that modulate biorhythms. Food choices and other lifestyle recommendations will be explored. Drop in: $20/session

Introduction to the Chakras: First Chakra – the Root Chakra with Marilyn Witkowski
1/12/14 SUNDAY 12p-4 pm Tuition: Member $50; Nonmember: $55
This introduction is the first in a series of seven classes. Each class focuses on all aspects of the respective chakra(s): location, color, organs, energy body, psychological age, relation to other chakras.  Students will have an opportunity to give and receive an Energy Healing treatment using the color frequency of the chakra discussed.  Wear comfortable clothing.
Remaining Classes:  2/9: Second Chakra; 3/9: Third Chakra; 4/6: Fourth Chakra; 5/4: Fifth Chakra; 6/8: 6th Chakra; 7/13: Seventh Chakra. Participants may register for all classes or an individual class as the classes is designed to be independent.  No prerequisites.

 

 
Zentangle Basics With Susan Green
1/13 MONDAY  6:30p-8:00 pm Tuition: Member: $35; Nonmember: $40 Includes $5 materials fee
How can a paper tile, a drawn string and several tangles help you to relax yet be focused? Zentangle is an easy-to-learn, relaxing, and fun way to create beautiful images by drawing structured, repetitive patterns from which beautiful images emerge.  Increased focus and creativity, provides artistic satisfaction. The Zentangle method is enjoyed all over this world by all ages, skill ranges, and interests.  Zentangle is a mindful practice that increases attentiveness and focus. It is easy to learn and easy to do.  Developed by Maria Thomas and Rick Roberts, learn more at their official site, www.zentangle.com.

T’ai Chi with Dell St. Ana
1/16 Thursdays  10 classes; 6:30p-7:45p Member: $112; Nonmember $122 (No Dropins)
For centuries people have used T’ai Chi to improve their energy and health. In this ten week class you will learn movements of the Yang style, short form of this practice. Please eat lightly or at least two hours before class. Wear loose, comfortable clothing. Snow makeup date: 3/27

Zentangle Basics with Susan Green
1/27 MONDAY 6:30p-8p 6:30p-8:00pm Tuition: Member: $35; Nonmember: $40 Includes $5 materials fee.
How can a paper tile, a drawn string and several tangles help you to relax yet be focused? Zentangle is an easy-to-learn, relaxing, and fun way to create beautiful images by drawing structured, repetitive patterns from which beautiful images emerge.  Increased focus and creativity, provides artistic satisfaction. The Zentangle method is enjoyed all over this world by all ages, skill ranges, and interests.  Zentangle is a mindful practice that increases attentiveness and focus. It is easy to learn and easy to do.  Developed by Maria Thomas and Rick Roberts, learn more at their official site, www.zentangle.com.

FEBURARY                                                                                 

Zentangle Intermediate with Susan Green
2/10 MONDAY Tuition: Member $30; Nonmember $35

In this intermediate class, you will learn more about strings, tangle enhancers, shading, and tangles requiring a deeper level of concentration. How can a paper tile, a drawn string and several tangles help you to relax yet be focused? Zentangle is an easy-to-learn, relaxing, and fun way to create beautiful images by drawing structured, repetitive patterns from which beautiful images emerge.  Increased focus and creativity, provides artistic satisfaction. The Zentangle method is enjoyed all over this world by all ages, skill ranges, and interests.  Zentangle is a mindful practice that increases attentiveness and focus. It is easy to learn and easy to do. Prerequisite: Zentangle Basics. Bring the Zentangle kit from the Zentangle Basics class.  Additional materials will be available for sale at the workshop.

 

Reiki I with Dell St. Ana
2/23     SUNDAY 10:30a-6:30 pm  Tuition $145

This day-long workshop will provide you with everything you need to become a Reiki practitioner. You will learn the history of Reiki, basic physical and energy anatomy, and the hand positions used to give a complete Reiki treatment to yourself and others. You will also receive the attunements that establish you as a channel for healing. Upon successful completion of the course, you will be given a personalized certificate that verifies your training and qualifies you to practice Reiki. If you are repeating this class, please contact Dell at (410) 822-3722 for tuition discount information. Please bring a bag lunch.

MARCH

3/23     10:30a- 4:30p  REIKI II (same tuition)

$177                   Dell             This class focuses on Reiki techniques for distance healing, including the distance healing symbols and attunements. If you are repeating this class, please contact Dell at 410-822-3722 for tuition discount information. Prerequisite: Level I training. Please bring a bag lunch and your Reiki Level I certificate.

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CBMM Academy for Lifelong Learning Winter Classes

CBMM_Speakers2The Academy for Lifelong Learning at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum is offering an engaging and diverse group of classes, courses and discussion groups for its 2014 Winter Session. This season’s topics range from an exploration of the short stories of the recent recipient of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Literature and classes on famous Supreme Court Cases to a Jonathan Edwards concert at the Mainstay in Rock Hall, MD.

ALL’s 2014 season begins with the Winter Social on January 9, from 4-6 p.m. at the Van Lennup Auditorium on the CBMM campus in St. Michaels, MD. Everyone with a passion for learning is welcome.

Master of the Modern Short Story, Selected Works of Alice Munro begins on Tuesday, January 14, 1 p.m. through 2 p.m., and meeting each Tuesday through February 4. The course will be led by John Ford, John Miller and Kate Livie, who have conducted popular literature classes in previous ALL seasons.

Peter Thatcher will lead Great Decisions on Mondays, January 27-March 17, 1:30-2:30 p.m. The eight-session course is developed by the Foreign Policy Association. The longest-standing and largest grassroots world affairs educational program of its kind, it is designed to encourage debate and discussion of the important global issues of our time.

Margot Miller and Esty Collet will lead the ALL Book Club in discussions of two of Pulitzer Prize-nominee Jonathan Franzen’s novels. On Thursday, January 30, from 1-2:30 p.m., the group will discuss The Corrections, a sprawling, satirical family drama, which earned Franzen a National Book Award.  At the same time on Thursday, March 6, the discussion will be about the author’s Freedom.

On Wednesdays, from January 15-February 12, 1-2:30 p.m., Al Kublelius will present Ideas Worth Learning and Spreading via TED (Technology, Entertainment and Design), a global organization that offers presentations by world-renowned people on such subjects as science, religion, philosophy, technology, health, politics, inspiration, athletics and wealth.

Mid-Shore Entrepreneurship Challenge: How to Succeed in Business on the Eastern Shore will meet for five Wednesday session, from February 5-March 5 at 10:30-noon. The course, geared for those both with and without experience in creating new businesses, will be led by Fred Smythe, Steve Dolbow, Michael Theilke and George Howie. The class will include case studies, processes and suggestions from marketing and new business development to reinventing an entire business.

Arthur (Otts) Laupus will conduct Major Supreme Court Cases: The Decisions and their Consequences on Thursdays, from February 6-27, 1-2:30 p.m. The course will examine many recent and past Supreme Court decisions, including the arguments, Constitutional issues, the spirit of the times and opposing philosophies.

Randy Welch will lead two sessions on Alaska, My Unintended Destination. From 10:30 a.m.-noon on March 25 and April 1, Welch will present his story, experiences, and travels from Maryland in1972 to Alaska, following in his Norwegian grandfather’s footsteps in commercial fishing for 12 years.

ALL’s Sheldon Goldgeier Lecture Series hosts authors with links to our  community. On Thursday, January 16, 10-11:30 a.m., Robert Rich, Jr.,  share the stories and photographs he gathered while recording Captain Larry Smith’s reflections in A Waterman’s Hope – Restore the Chesapeake.

 Barbara Lockhart will discuss her historical novel, The Language of the Fields: Elizabeth’s Field and the Underground Railroad, on Wednesday February 12, 10:30-noon. The author will give a brief reading as part of her presentation.

On Tuesday, March 11, 2-3:30 p.m., photographer and author Wilson Wyatt, Jr., will discuss his book Chesapeake View – Catching the Light, a collection of 82 photographic images. He will describe the images and how his hobby has become a pursuit of beauty in nature in its natural light.

Single-session courses include John Miller’s A Semester at Sea: Circumnavigating the Globe while Teaching Literature aboard a Student Ship on Wednesday February 19, 2:30-4:00 p.m.

Anne McCormick Adams will conduct a day trip, All Aboard! The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Museum, on Thursday, March 6, from 9 a.m.–5 p.m.  Tom Hollingshead will lead A Folk Music Legend, a concert by veteran folk rocker Jonathan Edwards, beginning 4:30 pm Friday, February 7 at The Mainstay in Rock Hall Maryland. Edwards has recorded more than 20 albums of songs with insight and humor.

“To Discover and Gaine:” The Islands of the Upper Chesapeake will meet on Tuesday afternoons, 1-2:30 p.m., from March 25-April 15. Course leader Philip Hesser will explore several upper Chesapeake Bay islands, focusing on their history from early Indian settlements to planned communities.

Financing the War of 1812, led by Ron Lesher, will meet for two Thursday sessions, March 13 and 20, from 10:30 a.m.-noon. In the sessions, participants will examine the issues, taxes and artifacts involved in financing the war in a time when Alexander Hamilton maintained that the government should only resort to internal duties during times of national emergency.

Richard Wagner will conduct Mind and Cosmos: The Nature of Reality for five Monday sessions, from March 3-31, from 10:30-noon. The class will address what science and philosophy have said about the natures of the physical universe, of mind, and of reality. No prior knowledge of science is necessary to participate in these discussions, but curiosity is a prerequisite.

Vacation Planning and Virtual Vacations via Google Earth will be led by Al Kubeluis on Wednesdays from February 19 through March 19, from 1-2:30 p.m. The class will examine how to plan a real vacation or take a virtual vacation using Google Earth, Google Maps and Google Search. Tables or smart phones with GPS capabilities will help, but are not required.

Bob Springer will conduct Friends and Foes, a course on the economic and religious reasons for the establishment of English colonies in the New World. The class, which meets on Mondays from February 24-March 24, 1-2:30 p.m. will explore the contentious relationship between the mother country and the colonies in World Wars I and II and other topics.

Affiliated with The Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, MD, the Academy for Lifelong Learning is a non-profit, volunteer-run organization committed to promoting the exploration of ideas, exchanging knowledge, and sharing experiences. For more information about these programs, to obtain a catalog for the full semester, or to register for courses, please call the Academy for Lifelong Learning at the CBMM at 410-745-4941.  To download a catalog online, go to http://www.cbmm.org/all. ALL is also on Facebook.

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ESLC and MET Settle Easement on Important Historical Property

 A piece of the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Scenic Byway has been preserved with a conservation easement, forever protecting a property owned by the descendants of a man once enslaved on the former plantation.

A piece of the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Scenic Byway has been preserved with a conservation easement, forever protecting a property owned by the descendants of a man once enslaved on the former plantation.

BUCKTOWN – A piece of the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Scenic Byway has been preserved with a conservation easement held by Eastern Shore Land Conservancy and Maryland Department of Natural Resources, permanently protecting the historic and ecological features of the property.

The Board of Public works approved a Program Open Space Coastal Resilience Easement on The Good Luck Farm, owned by descendants of a man once enslaved on the property. The easement, settled in December, permanently protects the property’s important ecological and historic features. Pictured are Jared Parks, ESLC Land Protection Specialist; Kim Tarver, attorney; Ellen Bronte Lake, property owner; Barbara Lake; and Benito Lake, property owner.

The Board of Public works approved a Program Open Space Coastal Resilience Easement on The Good Luck Farm, owned by descendants of a man once enslaved on the property. The easement, settled in December, permanently protects the property’s important ecological and historic features. Pictured are Jared Parks, ESLC Land Protection Specialist; Kim Tarver, attorney; Ellen Bronte Lake, property owner; Barbara Lake; and Benito Lake, property owner.

The Goodluck Farm is owned by Millie Lake, Benito Lake, Ellen Bronte Lake, and Ed James. Millie is the granddaughter of Martin Lake, who was born as a slave on The Brodess Plantation before the Civil War, according to a family history written by James.

On his fourth try, Martin Lake escaped to freedom on the Underground Railroad (before Tubman was a conductor). Tubman once was enslaved on this property, and according to family history, Martin Lake met her.

He joined the Union Army and after the war returned to Dorchester County. He worked for the Brodess family on the lands where he formerly was a slave, and the family gave him about three acres of farmland.

Martin Lake’s son, Monroe Lake Sr., inherited one acre of the land and traded it to a family member, Millie Lake Clash. Monroe Lake Sr. also purchased other portions of the Brodess Plantation as they became available.

“We are honored to work with the Lake family on protecting this important piece of the Eastern Shore,” said ESLC Executive Director Rob Etgen. “The stories that have occurred on and around this farm are critical to understanding where we have come from – and more importantly where we are going as a community.  The conservation easement will protect and enrich these stories for future generations.”

The Lake family, descendants of a slave on the farm, now own a large portion of the former plantation and maintain the Brodess family cemetery that still exists there.

The Good Luck Farm is preserved under Program Open Space Coastal Resilience Easements, designed to protect areas that could be prone to high waters and storm surges. The easement protects areas that allow wetlands to migrate. This was the first such easement approved by the Maryland State Board of Public Works.

Of the 221 acres, about 125 acres are farmland, and the rest is forest, wetland, and forested wetland, providing habitat for forest interior dwelling species and for the endangered Delmarva Fox Squirrel.

 

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Food Friday: Happy New Year!

Happy New Year! Actually, I am still in Christmas recovery mode and can’t even begin to think about the New Year. I am going to lay low and read books this weekend. After I pick up the detritus and flotsam and jetsam that the Christmas revelers have abandoned or used for festooning. Then I can think about the end of the year, And what a year it has been! We should all take a page from Scotland, and consider celebrating Hogmany.

Hogmany is how the Scots celebrate the end of the old year, and the beginning of the New Year. They take to the streets and stretch the celebration over a couple of days, which may only be for the most hardy. There are outdoor concerts, fireworks, bonfires, street parties and lots of traditional food and drink. A Winter Festival sounds like a lot of good old-fashioned pagan fun. http://www.hogmanay.net/history/faq#hogmanay

Traditional Hogmanay foods include haggis (of course), shortbread and Tipsy Laird Trifle made with Scotch Whisky instead of the usual sherry. I like a holiday that isn’t shy about its sweets. On Christmas Eve our neighbor made her annual Sticky Toffee Pudding for us. I am a complete convert. I cannot imagine Christmas Eve without it! What a delight! For Christmas dinner we had a family fave – flourless chocolate cake. And on New Year’s Day we will be celebrating a friend’s birthday by baking a Brooklyn Blackout Cake. That will be next week’s column – so don’t plan on starting your New Year’s diets until January 4. That cake is going to be a doozie!

I am reading Nigel Slater’s book “Eating for England” right now. It is a frothy little book of short essays that describes some fascinating English food eccentricities. He dwells with some affection over desserts and sweets. It must be the time of the year – I am longing for sweets. Read it when you want to blow your diet (or your New Year’s resolutions): http://www.nigelslater.com/books_view.asp?nBook_ID={A69E1743-399C-48E2-AA16-848E724D9A77}

We love Scottish shortbread any time of the year. Luckily we made a plethora of it for Christmas, so should have a good supply of it left if you want to stop by and wish us a “Guid New Year” on your way during the Torchlight Processional. We will all be dressed up in our new Christmas finery and daring one another to dive into the River Forth during the Queensferry Loony Dook. (Actually, I will probably be in my jimjams and ready for bed around 10:00, but I wish you all the best!)

Shortbread
3/4 pound unsalted butter, at room temperature
1 cup sugar
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 teaspoon salt
Preheat the oven to 350°F.
Mix the butter and 1 cup of sugar together until they are just combined. Add the vanilla. In a another bowl, sift together the flour and salt, then add to the butter and sugar mixture. Mix on low speed until the dough starts to come together. Roll the dough out on a surface dusted with flour, and shape into a flat disk. Cool in the fridge for about half an hour.

Roll the dough 1/2-inch thick and cut with a pizza cutter or a knife. Prick the dough with a fork to make lovely little pointillistic designs. Place the cookies on an ungreased baking sheet and sprinkle with sugar. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until the edges begin to brown. Allow them to cool before gobbling.

I am sticking to the traditional Champagne this New Year’s Eve. I did some research to see what Ilsa was drinking with Victor Laszlo in “Casablanca.” And this is it, the Champagne Cocktail. Hmmm. I don’t think I am sophisticated enough to try bitters in my Moët.

Champagne Cocktail
4 ounces chilled Champagne
2 drops bitters
1 sugar cube
1 ounce Cognac

Drop the bitters onto sugar cube. Drop sugar cube in a Champagne flute. Add Cognac, and top with Champagne. Listen for the Lone Piper and Happy New Year!

Here is the recipe for Tipsy Laid Trifle. Yumsters!
http://britishfood.about.com/od/dessert/r/tipsylaird.htm

http://www.scotland.org/celebrate-scotland/hogmanay

Auld Lang Syne
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And auld lang syne!

Chorus.For auld lang syne, my dear,
For auld lang syne.
We’ll take a cup o’ kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

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Managing Chronic Pain is Focus of Free, Six-week Program

Barbara V. Jarrell, coordinator for the Mid-Shore Chronic Disease Self-Management Program offered by MAC, Inc., is shown reviewing strategies for evaluating effective pain treatment. Jarrell will lead a free, six-week workshop, Chronic Pain Self-Management, in the Pain Management Center at UMSMC at Easton begins January 16. To register, call 410-310-2331.

Barbara V. Jarrell, coordinator for the Mid-Shore Chronic Disease Self-Management Program offered by MAC, Inc., is shown reviewing strategies for evaluating effective pain treatment. Jarrell will lead a free, six-week workshop, Chronic Pain Self-Management, in the Pain Management Center at UMSMC at Easton begins January 16. To register, call 410-310-2331.

More than 42 million Americans are living with chronic pain, according to the American Pain Foundation. Despite decades of research, chronic pain is not well understood and effective treatment remains elusive; a survey by the American Academy of Pain Medicine found that for nearly half of those suffering from chronic pain, comprehensive treatment with prescription drugs does not provide significant relief.

Chronic pain is often a function of such common problems as arthritis, multiple sclerosis, fibromyalgia, shingles, nerve damage, lower back problems and headache. Often, it is traced to a previous injury or illness from which the patient has long since healed; however, in millions of cases, the cause is undetermined. In recent years, the medical community has come to view chronic pain as a diagnosis unto itself, and the approach to treatment has been broadened to factor in the patient’s overall physical and psychological health, and to include strategies that empower patients to take an active role in reducing their suffering and improving their quality of life.

Empowerment is a key concept for Barbara V. Jarrell, coordinator for the Mid Shore Chronic Disease Self-Management Program offered by MAC, Inc., in Salisbury. A master trainer for MAC, Inc.’s free, six-week programs in chronic disease self-management (CDSMP) and chronic pain self-management (CPSMP), Jarrell’s mission is to teach as many  workshops as possible  – and help as many people – in Caroline, Dorchester, Kent, Queen Anne’s and Talbot counties.

“Both the disease self-management program and the pain self-management program were developed by Stanford Patient Education Research Center,” Jarrell explains. “Program leaders are trained to follow very detailed and evidence-based course content.”

Topics addressed in the Chronic Pain Self Management Program (CPSMP)  include techniques for managing frustration, fatigue and isolation as well as pain; appropriate exercises for strength, flexibility and endurance; appropriate use of medications; healthy eating and better balance; communicating with family, friends and health care professionals; and goal-setting, problem-solving and decision-making. The next session will be offered January 16-February 20, 1-3:30 p.m., in the Pain Management Center at University of Maryland Shore Medical Center at Easton.  Enrollment is open to family members and caregivers as well as to individuals coping with chronic pain.

 

Jarrell’s most recent class at the Pain Management Center (which she taught with Stephanie Latham, LMT, a licensed massage therapist associated with UM Shore Regional Health’s Center for Integrative Medicine) enrolled a small but varied group. Participants cited rheumatoid arthritis, work-related injury, a car accident and chronic disease as the precipitating causes of their pain. Says Jarrell, “Some of our patients come to us when they’ve tried everything else and feel desperate. Nearly all feel some level of debilitation, and many are fighting depression as a result. What is exciting is that nearly everyone who completes the program reports some benefit – relief from pain and fatigue, more energy, more confidence, a greater sense of calm, or some combination of all of these. And a very obvious benefit is that for up to three years after the class, they are likely to spend fewer days in the hospital than they had before, and also have fewer outpatient visits.”

 

Kip Koch, who was among the participants in the most recent Easton CPSMP class, has become a real advocate for its benefits. “This program has affected my life in a profound way –I’m happier, feel better, look better, and my family is happier. I’ve changed medications.  Life is good.”

 

The approach of CPSMP, which emphasizes active participation and mutual support, helps participants gain confidence in their ability to manage their health and to resume active and fulfilling lifestyles. For Jarrell, a certified personal trainer and group fitness instructor who also teaches exercise classes for older adults and Tai Chi for Better Balance, helping people gain the tools and confidence they need to manage chronic disease or pain and improve their quality of life is especially gratifying. “They learn so much from the program, but also from each other,” she says. “New friendships form – many times, the group members will agree to stay in touch after the class ends or even to meet again.”

 

Participation in the CDSMP and the CPSMP classes is free but advance registration is required due to limited space. For more information contact Barbara V. Jarrell, 410-310-2331.

 

CUTLINE:

Barbara V. Jarrell, coordinator for the Mid-Shore Chronic Disease Self-Management Program offered by MAC, Inc., is shown reviewing strategies for evaluating effective pain treatment. Jarrell will lead a free, six-week workshop, Chronic Pain Self-Management, in the Pain Management Center at UMSMC at Easton begins January 16. To register, call 410-310-2331.

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St. Michaels Elves

john-the-elf2-300x225_edited-1

John Mautz, Aida Khalil, Marianne Stallsmith

The spirit of the holidays is still found in of St. Michaels not just in the glitz and shine of the lights that go through this town, but in the hearts and generosity of all those who participated in the Elves to Elders Program.

St. Michaels Events a nonprofit 501c3 decided to assist Santa this Christmas by organizing a drive to help those who sometimes get forgotten this time of year our local elders. With with the help from Saint Michaels Community Center, local St. Michael’s

businesses, & generous members of the community It was a success.

The Elves to Elders program came to a happy end after about 4 weeks of dedication, work, organizing, sorting & the delivery of a holiday basket on the 23rd of December. 23 community residents received a basket full of much needed goods.

The deliveries were made with the help of Marianne & Stan Stallsmith, Aida & Steve Trissell, Julie Imirie, Karen, John & Dan Mautz. They loaded up the Carpenter Street van and drove around delivering not only an unexpected basket but the spirit of the season sharing a hug and a smile, with our neighbors who often get forgotten.

Not only did this project help some of those in need but was able to help restock the St. Michaels Food Pantry, which is organized by the various churches in town. Our elves have managed to finish their Christmas list just in time as the pantry was half empty.

St. Michaels Events want to thank those who helped with this project and wishes everyone a safe and happy Holiday and a wonderful New Year!

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Merry Christmas

The Spy will be closed today. Happy Holidays