Adkins Arboretum Offers Landscape Design Workshop March 3

Register for Adkins Arboretum’s Landscape Design Workshop on Sat., March 3, and learn how to transform your property into an attractive landscape with year-round interest and beauty.

Offered again by popular demand, this all-day workshop will address typical challenges of homeowners in the Chesapeake Bay region. Five experienced landscape designers and avid gardeners will lead this intensive planning session. Come with your challenges and dreams, and leave with a landscape plan, ideas and confidence to transform your home landscape for your enjoyment and pride. Workshop leaders are Jennifer Connoley, Michael Jensen, Cindy Shuart, Meredith Watters and Stephanie Wooten.

The workshop begins at 8:30 a.m. and ends at 3:30 p.m. The fee is $105 for Arboretum members, $130 for non-members and $165 for member couples. Advance registration is required. For more information or to register, visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

Adkins Arboretum is a 400-acre native garden and preserve at the headwaters of the Tuckahoe Creek in Caroline County. Open year round, the Arboretum is the region’s resource for native plants and education programs about nature, ecology and wildlife conservation gardening. For more information about programs, visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

Adkins Arboretum’s 2018 Juried Art Show on View through March 30

“The Scout” by Baltimore artist Karen Klinedinst.

There’s a powerful sense of the spirit of the Eastern Shore in Discovering the Native Landscapes of Maryland’s Eastern Shore, Adkins Arboretum’s nineteenth annual Juried Art Show. On view in the Arboretum Visitor’s Center through March 30, the show celebrates the Arboretum’s conservation mission and captures multiple aspects of our landscapes and waterscapes, from the familiar to the playful to the stunningly beautiful.

The show was juried by Benjamin T. Simons, director of Easton’s Academy Art Museum. Both he and the artists will be on hand for a reception from 3 to 5 p.m. on Sat., Feb. 10 to talk with visitors about the work in the show.

From 115 entries submitted by 45 artists from Maryland, Delaware, Virginia, Georgia and Washington, D.C., Simons chose 23 works for this show.

“I was mindful that the works would cohere as an exhibit and also relate to our landscape,” he explained. “There are various traditions represented, like plein-air, pastel, oil and sculpture, and I was glad to see there’s an etching because we’re introducing etching at the Museum, and there are some nice drawings, as well. A skillful drawing is really a pleasure.”

Simons awarded the annual first-prize Leon Andrus Award, named in honor of the Arboretum’s first benefactor, to Baltimore artist Karen Klinedinst for her three haunting photographs shot and processed on her iPhone. Although her work was new to him, Klinedinst is a frequent visitor to the Arboretum, photographing its grounds and teaching workshops in iPhoneography. Taken at the tidal Black Marsh Natural Area in the upper Chesapeake, this trio of photographs focuses on egrets in the expanse of their native habitat and calls to mind the radiant beauty and nuanced details of nineteenth-century Romantic paintings.

Speaking of the luminescent quality of Klinedinst’s work, Simons said, “To me, it has a kind of ‘nature-photography-meets-Civil-War-era-photography’ feeling, and that’s what I found so appealing about it. They’re printed on vellum with white gold leaf, which gives them really a special glow.”

Simons awarded the Leon Andrus second prize to Francesca Blythe of Potomac for “Wood Shell,” a sweeping driftwood sculpture burnished with velvety smoothness to a deep warm brown.

“She’s seeing something there that’s very spectacular,” he said. “It’s got an elegance of line to it, sort of a pointing finger quality, kind of an ancient hand, or a dragon head.”

Simons also awarded three Honorable Mentions, choosing two paintings and a drawing. The drawing, “Silhouette: Caledon Marsh I” by Donna Frostick of Henrico, Va., is a very unusual work made with a Sharpie marker. Drawn with intricate strokes of stark black on bright white paper, it hums with energy.

“Wood Shell” by Potomac artist Francesca Blythe.

“It’s a strange effect that that produces,” Simon commented. “It’s funny because you get a reflection off the water just by leaving it blank.”

The two paintings he chose are very different from one another. “Pioneer Point,” by Washington artist Carol Rowan, is a skillful and meticulous rendering in oil paint of a traditional Eastern Shore scene with two workboats moored in a quiet cove. “Foggy July (Leonard Cove, Trappe, MD),” by David Leonard of Easton, is also an oil painting, but its loose, spontaneous style captures a momentary impression of a small dock and pilings shimmering in the heat and humidity of a summer day. Simons was pleased to find such singularly varied approaches to the Eastern Shore landscape.

“That’s probably what unifies the show the most, the sense of place,” he commented. “Almost all of them convey a sense of place that’s one of the most powerful parts of living here.”

This show is part of Adkins Arboretum’s ongoing exhibition series of work on natural themes by regional artists. It is on view through March 30 at the Arboretum Visitor’s Center located at 12610 Eveland Road near Tuckahoe State Park in Ridgely. Contact the Arboretum at 410-634-2847, ext. 0 or info@adkinsarboretum.org for gallery hours.

Adkins Arboretum is a 400-acre native garden and preserve at the headwaters of the Tuckahoe Creek in Caroline County. Open year round, the Arboretum is the region’s resource for native plants and education programs about nature, ecology and wildlife conservation gardening. For more information, visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

Learn to Attract Pollinators Feb. 14 with Horticulturist Ruth Clausen

Most people realize that our food supply would be compromised completely without bees, butterflies, wasps, bats and other pollinators whose very existence is threatened by climate change, decreasing habitat and pesticide use. The good news, however, is that gardens planted with native plants can help to slow the decline of these critical creatures. On Wed., Feb. 14, learn how to provide pollinator-friendly food and habitat when author and horticulturist Ruth Rogers Clausen presents Native Plants to Attract Butterflies, Bees & Other Pollinators.

A native of Wales, Clausen trained as a horticulturist in England and has lived and worked in the United States for many years. She has taught and lectured widely over her lengthy career and has served as an advisor and judge for botanical gardens and flower shows across the country and around the world. A former horticulture editor for Country Living Gardener, she has written several books, including Perennials for American Gardens, co-authored with the late Nicolas H. Ekstrom. Others include Dreamscaping and 50 Beautiful Deer-Resistant Plants. Clausen has received a Quill and Trowel Award from the Garden Writers Association and has written for the American Garden Guides series. She also has contributed to Country Gardens, Brooklyn Botanic Garden’s Handbooks and Reader’s Digest Books.

Presented by Adkins Arboretum in partnership with the Garden Club of the Eastern Shore, the talk will be held at the Talbot County Free Library’s Easton Branch beginning at 11:15 a.m. It is free and open to the public, though advance registration is appreciated at adkinsarboretum.org or by calling 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

Adkins Arboretum is a 400-acre native garden and preserve at the headwaters of the Tuckahoe Creek in Caroline County. Open year round, the Arboretum offers educational programs for all ages about nature and gardening. For more information, visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

Adkins Arboretum Awarded Funds from the Institute of Museum and Library Services

The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) has awarded funding in the amount of $25,000 to Adkins Arboretum to upgrade and increase the accessibility of its Living Collections Database. These funds were awarded through IMLS’s largest competitive grant program, Museums for America, in the category of collections stewardship. Adkins Arboretum is considered a living museum due to its living plant and land preservation exhibits and its educational mission.

The Arboretum plans to upgrade its current Living Collections Database into a robust, user-friendly database, geographic information system (GIS) and web mapping platform for broader public access and improved future monitoring and management of its living collections. The desired result is an easy-to-navigate Living Collections Database that may be accessed online by all who are interested in learning more about the Arboretum’s flora. The expanded inventory of mapped plants will make it easier for visitors to locate species of interest.

The project will be undertaken over the next 18 months by Adkins staff, including Executive Director Ginna Tiernan, Land Steward Kathy Thornton, Chesapeake Conservation Corps member Blake Steiner, Arboretum volunteers, and local contractors Sylvan Kaufman of Sylvan Green Earth Consulting, Thayer Young of Cicada Systems GIS Consulting and Leslie Hunter Cario of Chesapeake Horticultural Services.

Originally founded as Maryland’s state arboretum in 1980, Adkins Arboretum has operated as a nonprofit since 1992. The Arboretum serves as a model for land management that strives to engage all people in the conservation, appreciation and enjoyment of the Chesapeake region’s native landscapes through education, recreation, art and community events. Located adjacent to Tuckahoe State Park, it operates and maintains a visitor’s center, 400 acres of meadows, woods and wetlands, and five miles of trails under a 50-year lease with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. The Arboretum’s diverse collection includes more than 600 species of trees, plants, grasses and wildflowers native to the Eastern Shore and the Mid-Atlantic coastal plain. For more information, visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847.

The Institute of Museum and Library Services is the primary source of federal support for the nation’s approximately 120,000 libraries and 35,000 museums. Its mission is to inspire libraries and museums to advance innovation, lifelong learning and cultural and civic engagement. IMLS’s grant making, policy development and research help libraries and museums deliver valuable services that make it possible for communities and individuals to thrive. To learn more, visit imls.gov or follow IMLS on Facebook and Twitter.

Adkins Arboretum is a 400-acre native garden and preserve at the headwaters of the Tuckahoe Creek in Caroline County. Open year round, the Arboretum offers educational programs for all ages about nature and gardening. For more information, visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

Adkins Arboretum Bus Trip to Philadelphia Flower Show

Celebrate the life-sustaining interplay of horticulture and water when Adkins Arboretum hosts a bus trip to the PHS Philadelphia Flower Show on Mon., March 5. With the theme “Wonders of Water,” the Flower Show will showcase beauty and environmental issues through exhibits ranging from rain forests to rain gardens.

America’s leading floral and garden designers will create tropical jungles, temperate forests, native woodlands and arid landscapes, all highlighting the astounding plants that thrive in each environment—from exquisite orchids and flowering vines to luminescent desert blooms. Guests will enter the Flower Show under a canopy of exotic flowers to marvel at a modernistic multilevel bamboo waterfall. Inspired by the planet’s magnificent rain forests, the Entrance Garden will pay homage to these astonishing and varied ecosystems with towering trees and tiny mosses, creeping vines and wide-spreading ferns, withering leaves and a living roof of green, and colorful flowers in myriad textures. An ever-shifting rain curtain will guide visitors over a “suspended” rope bridge.

Gardeners of all skill levels will find water-wise concepts, including rain gardens and xeriscaping, plant-your-own experiences and ideas they can use in their own home environments, from small urban spaces to expansive landscapes. A new attraction, “America’s Backyard,” will offer smart ideas for outdoor living and conservation tips for the home garden. Guests can also create their own mini-water garden and interact with the delicate inhabitants of “Butterflies Live.” Special features will explore innovative ways green infrastructure is used to protect and conserve our water sources.

Tickets are $95 for Arboretum members, $120 for non-members and include transportation, driver gratuity and admission to the Flower Show. The bus departs from Aurora Park Drive in Easton at 9 a.m. with additional stops at the westbound Route 50/Route 404 Park and Ride at 9:20 a.m. and the Route 301/Route 291 Park and Ride in Millington at 9:45 a.m. Return time is approximately 8 p.m.

The nation’s largest and longest-running horticultural event, the PHS Philadelphia Flower Show features stunning displays by the world’s premier floral and landscape designers. Started in 1829 by the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, the show introduces diverse and sustainable plant varieties and garden and design concepts. It has been honored as the best event in the world by the International Festivals & Events Association, competing with such events as the Kentucky Derby Parade, Tournament of Roses Parade and Indianapolis 500 Festival. Proceeds from the Flower Show benefit the year-round programs of PHS that have become national models of urban greening.

Advance registration is required by Fri., Feb. 9. To register, visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410.634.2847, ext. 0.

Adkins Arboretum is a 400-acre native garden and preserve at the headwaters of the Tuckahoe Creek in Caroline County. Open year round, the Arboretum is the region’s resource for native plants and education programs about nature, ecology and wildlife conservation gardening. For more information, visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

Science Programs for Homeschool Students Begin in February at Adkins Arboretum

This winter, Adkins Arboretum will offer homeschool programs for students ages 7 and up. Programs include:

Hooray for Herps!
Tuesdays, 2/13, 2/27, 3/13, 3/27, 4/10, 4/24
1–2:30 p.m.
Enter the bizarre and fascinating world of reptiles and amphibians in this exciting, hands-on herpetology program. We’ll compare herps past and present, conduct experiments to learn how herps regulate body temperature, investigate the survival strategies of salamanders and much more. Searching for herps in the Arboretum’s wetland, stream and forest will be part of the fun. Hooray for Herps! is for students ages 7 to 10.

The Climate Challenge
Tuesdays, 2/6, 2/20, 3/6, 3/20, 4/3 4/17
1–2:30 p.m.
Global climate change and its impacts on people and resources pose serious challenges. The actions we take today will influence the path of future greenhouse gas emissions and the magnitude of warming. They will also affect our ability to respond and adapt to changes. This program for students ages 11 and up seeks to educate the rising generation of environmental stewards about the fundamental issues of climate science the impacts of climate change on society and global resources, and mitigation and adaptation strategies.

Advance registration is required for both programs. Visit adkinsarboretum.org for more information or to register your student, or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

Adkins Arboretum is a 400-acre native garden and preserve at the headwaters of the Tuckahoe Creek in Caroline County. Open year round, the Arboretum offers educational programs for all ages about nature and gardening. For more information, visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

Photographs by Lynn Teo Simarski on View at Adkins Arboretum

“Spikerush” by Lynn Teo Simarski

During the six years she lived aboard a boat on the Chesapeake and its tributaries, photographer and science writer Lynn Teo Simarski often slipped her kayak into the water to explore the delicate borders where water mingles with land. In her show Emergent: Visual Sips from the Waterline, on view through February 2 at the Adkins Arboretum Visitor’s Center, her digital photographs tell the stories of the remarkable plants she found in the region’s quiet coves and marshes. There will be a reception to meet the artist on Sat., Dec. 16 from 3 to 5 p.m.

Sliding along low in the water, the kayak gives Simarski a close-up, intimate view of every detail of the shoreline. In photographs that range from spare black-and-white images of slender marsh grasses and their dancing reflections to masses of lotus leaves floating in water rippled with brilliant autumn colors, she distills moments of beauty and playfulness that few people get to see. There are softly rising mists, dramatic slanting shadows and an occasional dragonfly perching weightlessly on a bit of grass.

Simarski, who lives in Alexandria, Va., when she and her husband aren’t aboard their 40-foot trawler, Bright Pleiades, said, “I kayak as much as I can. That’s really my favorite part about having lived on the boat.”

In a perfect image of the interconnections of earth, water and sky, sprightly blades of grass emerge from satiny reflections of the clouds above in “Skygrass.” Simarski’s fascination with emergents—plants that are rooted in the underwater soil but grow up into the air—continually draws her to the fragile edges of the water where these aquatic plants perform a vital role in the ecosystem by providing shelter, food and breeding places for countless creatures.

The majority of the show’s photographs come from the Chesapeake region, but Simarski shot a few of them in Maine, Wisconsin and South Carolina. Interestingly, except for some tassels of Spanish moss dangling from a leafy branch, it’s hard to tell the difference. There’s a certain universality in the elegant calligraphic gestures of blades of marsh grass and the ever-changing effects of light, mirrored skies, turning tides and shifting seasons.

With its perky bright green stalks tipped with gold, Spikerush” is a jaunty image. A type of sedge, it’s small and grows just barely above the water’s surface. Simarski found it with tiny concentric rings dimpling the water where its stalks meet their own reflections.

“This is one that was not from a kayak,” she explained. “It was spring, and I was going for a walk at the marina in Galesville, Md., where we keep our boat. I saw these patterns in a ditch, and I was just stunned. Here were these rushes only about three inches high. So, I ran back to the boat and drove back over so I could stand on the car and look down at the ditch to get the viewpoint I wanted.”

In addition to her photography, Simarski has written articles on the Bay for Chesapeake Bay Magazine and Bay Weekly. She and her husband, Guy G. Guthridge, are currently working on a book called Chesapeake Winter about their years living aboard their boat and their conversations with scientists, watermen and others about the Bay’s future. They are planning a trip to Florida along the Intracoastal Waterway.

For Simarski, the margins of water and land are endlessly compelling. Speaking of her love for these vulnerable, ever-changing perimeters, she said, “The boat enables me to go to these places you can’t get to by road and put the kayak in. The boat is our magic carpet.”

This show is part of Adkins Arboretum’s ongoing exhibition series of work on natural themes by regional artists. It is on view through Feb. 2 at the Arboretum Visitor’s Center located at 12610 Eveland Road near Tuckahoe State Park in Ridgely. Contact the Arboretum at 410–634–2847, ext. 0 or info@adkinsarboretum.org for gallery hours.

Adkins Arboretum’s Candlelit Caroling Celebration on December 9

Ring in the holiday season with an evening of music, light and merriment when Adkins Arboretum hosts its annual Candlelit Caroling Celebration on Sat., Dec. 9 from 5 to 8 p.m.

At the Visitor’s Center, enjoy seasonal live music in the gallery by Chestertown performers Dovetail and Nevin Dawson, along with hors d’oeuvres and a cash wine bar. Take a candlelit walk along the woodland paths, stopping along the way to sing carols and roast marshmallows over a roaring bonfire. Join Delmarva Stargazers in the meadow to view the winter sky, and top off the evening with a winter tram ride to see light displays around the meadow. Wildlife tree decorating and a gingerbread playhouse will be of special interest to children.

Tickets for adults are $20 for members and $25 for non-members. Children ages 3–18 are $10, and children 2 and under are free. This event tends to sell out; please register by Tues., Dec. 5.

To reserve tickets for the Candlelit Caroling Celebration, visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410.634.2847, ext. 0.

Adkins Arboretum Hosts Magic in the Meadow Gala

Howard and Mary McCoy of Centreville arrive at Adkins Arboretum’s Magic in the Meadow gala.

Perfect weather and delightful company made for an enchanted evening when Adkins Arboretum hosted its Magic in the Meadow gala on Sat., Sept. 23. Featuring a live auction, hoop dancing by Baltimore performance artist Melissa Newman, world-class jazz by the Peter Revell Band and sumptuous food by Peach Blossoms Events, the event brought both new and old friends together to garner support for the Arboretum’s education programs that promote the conservation and preservation of the Chesapeake Bay region’s native landscapes.

Next year’s gala is scheduled for Sat., Sept. 22. Mark your calendar, and join us for this wonderful evening!

Magic in the Meadow was sponsored in part by Unity Landscape Design/Build, Shore United Bank, Avon-Dixon Insurance Agency, The Hill Group at Morgan Stanley Smith Barney, Warrington Builders, Accounting Strategy Group, Joanne Shipley Graphic Design, Booth, Booth, Cropper & Marriner, PC, Delmarva Business Network, Piazza Italian Market, St. Michaels Fine Woodworking and numerous private sponsors.

Discover Oxford’s Native Gardens on Adkins Arboretum’s Annual “Celebrating Natives” Tour

The fall garden is a study in contrasts. Fiery color competes with the subtle structure of stems that have shed their flowers. Tall grasses turn golden in sunlight, while berries and fruits hang low on vines and branches to tantalize wildlife. On Sat., Nov. 4, discover the colors and textures of the fall garden when Adkins Arboretum brings its fifth annual “Celebrating Natives” Garden Tour to the Oxford area.

The self-guided driving tour features five private gardens and two public areas in and around Oxford, each demonstrating varying commitments to native plantings and uses of sustainable practices such as rain barrels and composting. The gardens range from Preservation Green—an in-town research center for horticultural studies—to a 3.5-acre “sanctuary” garden that takes found objects to a new level, to stands of pines mingled with organic vegetable beds and native perennials on Island Creek. Explore the new Oxford Conservation Park, an 86-acre parcel planted with more than 5,000 native plants and 800-plus native trees and shrubs to provide habitat for wildlife and appeal to local pollinators. Hop on the Oxford-Bellevue Ferry, established in 1683 and the nation’s oldest privately owned ferry operation, to explore a rambling 5-acre freeform garden on Plaindealing Creek near the mouth of the Tred Avon River.

The first garden tour of its kind on the Eastern Shore, “Celebrating Natives” focuses on sustainable approaches to Eastern Shore gardening and exemplifies the Arboretum’s mission of teaching about and showing by example the importance of using native plants in restoring balance to the ecosystem and fostering community relationships. Native plants are those that grew and thrived on the Eastern Shore before the introduction of European settlers. Because these plants have adapted naturally to the region’s ecology of climate, insects and wildlife, they are a better choice than non-native plants. The tour not only highlights the beauty of the gardens but emphasizes their importance in a biodiverse landscape.

“Celebrating Natives” will take place rain or shine on Sat., Nov. 4 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tickets are $25 in advance at adkinsarboretum.org or $30 the day of the tour at the Oxford Community Center200 Oxford Rd. Check-in will begin at 10 a.m. at the Community Center. Refreshments and restrooms will also be available there. A list of local restaurants will be provided. For more information or to order tickets, visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.