CBMM Acknowledges Volunteers for Generous Service

On June 15, 2017, the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum recognized a dedicated team of more than 385 volunteers aboard the Patriot for their combined 27,552.5 hours of service towards the museum over the past year. Several volunteers were recognized by CBMM for their work in boat restoration and maintenance, boat donations, buildings and grounds, education, exhibitions, museum store, and volunteer programming. The river cruise reception was generously sponsored by Patriot Cruises of St. Michaels, Md. and Garden & Garnish of Trappe, Md.

Special recognition was given to volunteers with the highest hours of cumulative service, including John Hawkinson with 10,000 hours; Ellen Plummer, Norman Plummer, and Mike Sweeney with 8,000 hours; Paul Ray with 7,000 hours; Lloyd Devigne, Roger Galvin, and Don Parks with 5,000 hours; and Jerry Friedman and Bob Petizon with 4,000 hours. Many other volunteers were recognized for reaching several milestones of 100 hours and above in their volunteer service toward CBMM.

“The engagement and service from our volunteers is such an extraordinary part of what makes CBMM a very special place to visit,” says CBMM President Kristen Greenaway. “The effort our volunteers put forth each and every day to ensure a great experience for our guests is quite remarkable.”

CBMM is always looking for volunteers to help throughout various areas of its operations, including front desk assistants, interpretive educators, festival helpers, buildings and grounds assistants, and more. For more information, contact CBMM Volunteer & Education Coordinator Allison Speight at aspeight@cbmm.org or 410-745-4941 or visit bit.ly/cbmmvolunteer.

Hudson River Sloop “Clearwater” at CBMM this July

The Hudson River Sloop Clearwater will arrive at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Md. on Wednesday, July 5, and remain dockside along CBMM’s campus through Friday, July 7, 2017.

The replica sloop will be available for deck tours on Thursday, July 6 from noon to 5:00 p.m. Deck tours are free for CBMM members or with general museum admission,which is good for two days and is $15 for adults, $12 for seniors, $6 for children ages 6–17, and free for active military, CBMM members, and children ages 5 and under.

The sloop Clearwater, a replica vessel modeled after the Dutch vessels that sailed the Hudson River in the 18th and 19th centuries, was launched on May 17, 1969, from Harvey Gamage Shipyard in South Bristol, Maine. Those early cargo vessels were specially designed for the variable winds, currents and depths of the Hudson. Sailing from town to town today, the Clearwater models her course after that of the historic Dutch sloops.

Clearwater is recognized as America’s Environmental Flagship and is among the first vessels in the United States to conduct science-based environmental education aboard a sailing ship. In 2004, Clearwater was named to the National Register of Historic Places for its role in the environmental movement.

The replica 17th century trading ship Maryland Dove will be arriving at CBMM’s docks on Thursday, July 6 and is in St. Michaels through Monday, July 10. Local school groups will be touring the ship, with Dove open for boarding to all CBMM guests from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., July 8 to 10. The public is invited for free public access to Maryland Dove while at CBMM on July 8, from 5:00 to 8:00 p.m.

The tall ship Pride of Baltimore II will be at CBMM on Friday, August 11, and remain dockside along CBMM’s campus through August 13, with deck tours offered from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. daily.

Established in 1965, the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum is dedicated to preserving and exploring the history, environment, and people of the Chesapeake Bay, with values of relevancy, authenticity, and stewardship guiding its mission. More information about CBMM and these visiting vessels can be found at cbmm.org. For more information about Clearwater, visit clearwater.org.

Edna E. Lockwood progress continues

Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum Boatyard Manager Michael Gorman reports work continues on the historic restoration of 1889 bugeye Edna E. Lockwood, with each of the nine-logs making up her new hull pinned together and shipwrights moving on to fitting chunks in her bow and stern over the summer.

Boatyard Manager Michael Gorman works on driving the final pins into Edna E. Lockwood’s nine-log hull.

This past spring brought much progress to the project, with the hull flipped via crane in April and the two wing logs pinned to the rest of the assembled hull in May. In September, Edna’s topside will be moved to the new hull so shipwrights can begin to marry the two, an important step in the restoration project. New stems, hatches, and additional structure will be installed this fall, with sails to be sent out for new ones to be made.

The team is restoring CBMM’s queen of the fleet and National Historic Landmark Edna E. Lockwood by replacing her nine-log hull, in adherence to the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Historic Vessel Preservation. Shipwright apprentices working on the project are generously supported by the Seip Family Foundation and the RPM Foundation. All work takes place in full public view through 2018, when Edna will be placed on the marine railway and launched at CBMM’s OysterFest in October.

To keep up with the project, visit CBMM in St. Michaels, Md. or go to ednalockwood.org.

Cruise Aboard “Winnie Estelle” June 20, August 3

On Tuesday, June 20, from 10 to 11:30 a.m., children and adults are invited to join Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum educators aboard buyboat Winnie Estelle for an up-close and personal exploration of the Miles River and its unique habitat and ecology. The cruise will be offered again on Thursday, August 3, from 1 to 2:30 p.m.

During the ecology cruise, participants will learn how to monitor the water quality of the river, perform water testing, and explore the critters on an oyster reef, all while cruising in the breeze on CBMM’s buyboat. Birders will enjoy the route, which features a route near Long Point Island, known for its eagle and osprey populations and heron rookery.

Built in 1920 by Noah T. Evans—a native Smith Islander—Winnie Estelle was used as a workboat on the lower Chesapeake for more than 50 years, carrying seafood and produce to market across the Bay. In the 1970s, she made Belize her port of call, where she operated as an island trader, carrying lumber from Honduras to Belize, and later as a charter boat for divers. She returned to the Chesapeake in 2012.

Winnie Estelle runs four daily cruises on Fridays through Mondays beginning each May and continuing through October, with same-day tickets purchased at CBMM. Cruises are also offered to watch Miles River log canoe races on June 24, July 29, Sept. 9, and Sept. 16. For details, visit cbmm.org.

Boarding passes for the June 20 and August 3 ecology cruises are $15 for CBMM members and $20 for non-members, with registration required to bit.ly/CBMM_OntheWater. For more on Winnie Estelle or CBMM, visit cbmm.org.

Log Canoe Racing: Photographs by Morris Ellison Opens June 16

Opening in conjunction with the 30th annual Antique & Classic Boat Festival, Log Canoe Racing: Photographs by Morris Ellison features photos of the Chesapeake Bay’s iconic sailing log canoes and continues at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Md. through September 25, 2017.

A native of Oxford, Ellison is a retired sailmaker and longtime log canoe sailor who now volunteers as a carpenter and varnisher in CBMM’s Boatyard.

Photo by Morris Ellison

Ellison earned a Master of Philosophy in neurophysiology at Yale University. While continuing toward his Ph.D., his advisor asked, “Morris, how are you ever going to be successful if you keep going sailing on the weekends?” This led to a career change.

After several years as a sail designer and loft manager for North Sails, he started Ellison Sails in 1979 as a sail and boat canvas shop in Easton, Md. He has sailed on most of the log canoes and made sails for nine of them. For seven years, he trimmed the jib on Magic, a log canoe skippered by Jimmy Wilson, winning two Governor’s Cups and several high point trophies. Since then, he has photographed the log canoes from a small boat.

Ellison prints some of his canoe photos in sepia tone, giving them the feel of an old photograph, which he feels conveys a timeless quality to the classic log canoes.

Photo by Morris Ellison

Hosted by the Chesapeake Bay Chapter of the Antique & Classic Boat Society, the 30th annual Antique & Classic Boat Festival runs June 16-18, and brings a sense of nostalgia to the Miles River and CBMM’s docks and campus, drawing some of the area’s finest classic boats, nautical and maritime treasures, entertainment, food, and libations to this waterfront festival.

This year’s festival will feature a selection of sailing log canoes on land and in the water. A regional adaptation of the traditional Indian dugout canoes, log canoes were used from the 18th through the 20th century as all-purpose Chesapeake craft, to harvest oysters, transport goods, and to get people from place to place. A small fleet continues—including CBMM’s Flying Cloud, Edmee S., Marianne, and Bufflehead—with many seen today along the Chesapeake’s Chester, Miles, Choptank, and Tred Avon rivers during highly competitive sailing races each summer and fall. With long masts and large sails, these boats keep upright as they accelerate to speeds of 10 knots or more, with crew members climbing to the ends of 15-foot boards placed perpendicular to the boat itself.

To learn more, visit www.cbmm.org.

Chautauqua Summer Series on July 10-12

On the evenings of July 10-12, the annual Chautauqua Summer Series brings three live performances to the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum’s waterfront. This year’s Maryland Humanities’ series features Voices of the Great War, with all living history performances taking place from 7:00 -9:00 p.m. along Fogg’s Cove and the Miles River. All performances are free and open to the public.

The 2017 Chautauqua Summer Series at CBMM is generously sponsored by Karen and Langley Shook, and is funded in part by a grant from the Talbot County Arts Council, with revenues provided by the Maryland State Arts Council, Talbot County, and the Towns of Easton, Oxford and St Michaels.

“The world must be made safe for democracy. Its peace must be planted upon the tested foundations of political liberty.” With these words, President Woodrow Wilson asked the United States Congress to declare war on Germany. For nearly three years, war raged in Europe after the 1914 assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria sparked a diplomatic crisis. Despite attempts to remain neutral, because of various acts of aggression by Germany, including the death of 128 Americans in the German attack on the British passenger liner RMS Lusitania, the United States officially entered World War I in April 1917.

For its 23rd season, Chautauqua is commemorating the 100th anniversary of the United States’ entry into the Great War as three World War I-era figures come to life.

On Monday, July 10, Bill Grimmette, a living history interpreter, storyteller, actor, and motivational speaker, will portray W.E.B. Du Bois, a sociologist and scholar, and one of the most important African-American activists of the early twentieth century. On Tuesday, July 11, Chautauqua veteran Doug Mishler, an independent scholar who has taught at the University of Nevada and Western Washington University, will portray General John Pershing, commander of the American Expeditionary Force on the Western Front in World War I, who was one of America’s most accomplished generals. On Wednesday, July 12, the St. Michaels series wraps up with Judd Bankert bringing to life President Woodrow Wilson. Bankert has been portraying President Wilson as part of the Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library and Birthplace’s living-history program since 2000.

A Chautauqua performance is a historical dramatization featuring individuals who are part scholar and part actor. Each performance is broken into three acts, where the performer represents a historical figure in the first person, then invites audience questions; and in the final act, steps out of character to answer questions that the historical figure could not have been able to answer.

“Chautauqua” was the name for the Chautauqua Lake area in upstate New York, where the movement began in 1874 as a Methodist summer retreat. A wide range of religious lectures and educational programs attracted a huge following. As it evolved, the Chautauqua movement presented the latest in thinking in politics, economics, literature, science, and religion. Maryland Humanities launched the modern Chautauqua program in Maryland in 1995.

The Chautauqua Summer Series at CBMM invites guests to bring carry-on food and beverages along with their own chairs and blankets for seating. All performances are held on the lawn of Fogg’s Landing, near CBMM’s Steamboat Building, with convenient entry adjacent to parking. In the event of rain, performances will be held in the Van Lennep Auditorium, with space limited. No registration is required.

For more information, visit cbmm.org or call 410-745-2916. Additional information about the Chautauqua Summer Series can be found at mdhumanities.org.

Lad Mills Retires from CBMM

Lad Mills of Easton, Md. recently retired as Charity Boat Donation Director from his nearly 16 years of service to the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Md.

During his tenure, Mills traveled up and down the east coast, working with boat owners, yacht brokers, marinas, boatyards, and other donors and potential buyers, to support CBMM through boat donations and sales. Now leading the program is Todd Taylor, who joined CBMM in January 2015.

“Lad’s efforts and dedication helped build the largest and most reputable charity boat donation operation in the nation, and I’ve sincerely enjoyed my time working with him and learned a tremendous amount,” commented Taylor. “Although Lad will be focusing on his R&R with his family, we’ll continue to run CBMM’s Charity Boat Donation Program as one of the finest around.”

Mills started at CBMM in September 2001, working with CBMM’s John Ford to build its budding charity boat donation program and special events operations.

“We soon learned Lad was excellent at selling boats,” commented Ford at a recent reception honoring Mills. “It didn’t take long for the program to really take off.”

Shortly thereafter, Mills focused his work on the Charity Boat Donation Program, growing it from a few donations and sales a year, to hundreds of transactions and an annual Charity Boat Auction held each Labor Day weekend along CBMM’s waterfront.

“I sold my first boat for $50 to a young couple on their 35-foot sailboat who were sailing around the world,” recalls Mills. “Their dinghy was recently destroyed in a storm, and they didn’t have a lot of money. I got really excited about helping this young couple out, while helping a donor get rid of a boat, and handing over their check to the accounting office. It’s really a win-win-win situation, and has been a whole lot of fun.”

Mills says the most rewarding aspects of his career have been those win-win-win situations—as he describes them—and looks forward to seeing CBMM continue to grow, and increase its impact on to the communities served.

“It’s a phenomenal place,” said Mills. “My wife Tina and I visit a lot of maritime museums, and what CBMM is doing in the boatyard, collections, and programming is just off the charts.”

In his retirement, Mills is immediately working on getting his Lyman motorboat back on the Miles River, with trips already taken and future travel plans made for South Bristol, Maine.

“Because of Lad’s work, hundreds of thousands of dollars have been raised in support of our education, restoration, and exhibition programming,” commented CBMM President Kristen Greenaway. “CBMM would not be the world-class institution it is without the dedicated work of people like Lad, for which we are very grateful.”

CBMM’s Charity Boat Donation Program accepts and sells all manner of craft year-round, and offers long-standing boat sales and lease/charter operations, with 100% of the proceeds supporting the children and adults served by its education, curatorial, and boatbuilding programs. This year’s Charity Boat Auction is set for Saturday, September 2, with more about CBMM’s Charity Boat Donation Program at bit.ly/buyaboat.

See “Maryland Dove” in St. Michaels this July

Maryland Dove will arrive at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum on Thursday, July 6, and can be seen out on the Miles River and dockside through Monday, July 10. Local school groups will be touring the ship, with Dove open for boarding to all CBMM guests from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. July 8 – 10. Free public access will be available on July 8 from 5 – 8:00 pm.

“We are honored to host Maryland Dove,” said CBMM President Kristen Greenaway. “The ship is an important piece of maritime and American history—especially Maryland history—and we hope everyone will visit to experience it for themselves.”

Maryland Dove is a re-creation of the late 17th century trading ship that brought the first settlers to what is now Maryland. Built in a shipyard near Cambridge, Md. in 1978, Dove is owned by the state of Maryland and operated and maintained by the Historic St. Mary’s City Commission. To learn more about Maryland Dove, visit bit.ly/marylanddove.

Regina Faden, executive director at Historic St. Mary’s City, said “We are grateful to CBMM, our partner and host, for helping us share Maryland’s ship with visitors on the Eastern Shore.  Not everyone is able to come to St. Mary’s City, so we’re coming to them!”

The tours are free with CBMM admission, which is good for two days and is $15 for adults, $12 for seniors, $6 for children ages 6–17, and free for active military, CBMM members, and children aged 5 and under.

The Hudson River Sloop Clearwater will also be at CBMM on Wednesday, July 5 through Friday, July 7. The tall ship Pride of Baltimore II will be at CBMM Friday, August 11 through August 13, with deck tours offered from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. daily. For more information, visit cbmm.org or call 410-745-2916.

Antique & Classic Boat Festival Seminars Announced

The 30th annual Antique & Classic Boat Festival, taking place June 16-18 at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Md., is offering a series of maritime and restoration seminars beginning at 2:00 p.m. on Friday, June 16 and continuing through Saturday, June 17. Offered free with two-day festival admission, the seminars take place in CBMM’s waterfront Van Lennep Auditorium, with limited seating and no registration needed.

Friday’s seminars begin at 2:00 p.m. with CBMM Chief Curator Pete Lesher presenting “Chesapeake Log Canoes – Preserving Historic Boats, Preserving Traditions,” followed by Antique & Classic Boat Society Chesapeake Bay Chapter Past-President Jeff Beard with an “Aesthetic Guide to Collectible Cabin Cruisers, 1940-1970” beginning at 3:00 p.m.

Saturday’s seminars feature informative presentations on marine topics, headlined by the Honorable John C. North II’s and maritime artist Marc Castelli’s “Chesapeake Log Canoes” presentation beginning at 1:00 p.m. In honor of the festival’s 30th anniversary, these celebrated sailing log canoes are featured for this year’s show, with a selection seen on land and in the water throughout the three-day event.

Other Saturday seminars include “Propeller Technology from Cup to Pitch,” beginning at 10:00 a.m. and led by VT Design Principal Gary Van Tassel. At 11:00 a.m., Moores Marine President Jim Moores will lead a conversation around “JFK’s Honey Fitz & Hemingway’s Pilar—Master Restorations by Moores Marine,” followed with ACBS Smith Mountain Lake Chapter’s Eric Zelman with a “Stitch in Time: Antique Boat Upholstery” beginning at 2:00 p.m.

Hosted by the Chesapeake Bay Chapter of the Antique & Classic Boat Society, this Father’s Day weekend event brings a sense of nostalgia to the Miles River and CBMM’s docks and campus, drawing some of the area’s finest classic boats, nautical and maritime treasures, entertainment, food, and libations to this waterfront festival.

Chesapeake log canoes, like those shown here under sail on the Miles River, are featured for the 30th Annual Antique Classic Boat Festival.

The show attracts the finest runabouts to yachts, including race boats, work boats, launches, hydroplanes, and utilities. Chris-Craft, Trumpy, Gar Wood, Donzi, and Lyman are among some of the boats represented.

One of the East Coast’s largest gathering of antique and classic boats, the festival’s signature Arts at Navy Point pavilion brings more than 70 juried fine artists, craftspeople, and vendors offering nautical and maritime-themed items for boat and home.

Building demonstrations, family activities, and a nautical flea market take place throughout the weekend, with a selection of regional and grilled foods, music, and a waterside bar and deck for libations and other drinks available.

Children’s activities include boatbuilding craft projects, and the Hagerty Insurance Marine Youth Judging program, where youth learn about the award-winning qualities of preserved and restored classic boats. Along the Fogg’s Landing side of CBMM’s campus, the festival’s Field of Dreams features an array of restorable classic boats and motors, along with other items in a nautical flea market sale.

Chesapeake log canoes, like Island Bird shown here, will be featured for the 30th Annual Antique Classic Boat Festival.

Festival hours are Friday from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.; Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.; and Father’s Day, Sunday from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. The festival includes two-day admission to all of CBMM’s special and permanent exhibitions, including the 1879 Hooper Strait Lighthouse, where guests can climb to the top for views of the Miles River and St. Michaels harbor. The event is $5 for CBMM adult members, or $18 for adults; $15 for seniors and students with ID; and $6 for children 6-17.

Scenic river cruises aboard CBMM’s 1920 buyboat Winnie Estelle will be offered throughout the festival, with boat rides and food an additional cost. For safety reasons, non-service dogs are prohibited at CBMM festivals. Festival parking for all three days and a Saturday shuttle service are free, with CBMM a short walk to specialty shops, restaurants, inns, bed & breakfasts, and other attractions in St. Michaels’ historic district. For more information, visit bit.ly/boatfestival17 or call 410-745-2916.

Navy Point Goes Nautical June 16-18

More than 60 juried maritime artists and craftsman will be at the waterfront Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum’s Antique & Classic Boat Festival June 16-18 when The Arts at Navy Point returns to St. Michaels, Md. In addition to traditional maritime artists and craftspeople from throughout the United States, a number of marine tradespeople will also be exhibiting at the event.

This year’s exhibitors include marine wildlife master carver Dave Newcomer of North Conway, N.H., who begins with interestingly shaped pieces of wood and turns them into dolphins, whales, mermaids, and entire schools of fish.

Now in its 30th year, the Antique & Classic Boat Festival is held by the Chesapeake Bay Chapter of the Antique & Classic Boat Society and brings an era of by-gone days to Father’s Day weekend as wooden classics, vintage race boats, and other antique and Chesapeake Bay-related boats take to the Miles River and CBMM’s 18-acre waterfront campus.

The Arts at Navy Point features nautical- and maritime-related oil and watercolor paintings, sculptures created from various media, photographs, wildlife carvings, jewelry, boat models, furniture, books, and more.

This year’s exhibitors include marine wildlife master carver Dave Newcomer of North Conway, N.H., who begins with interestingly shaped pieces of wood and turns them into dolphins, whales, mermaids, and entire schools of fish. Newcomer will be providing carving demonstrations throughout the three-day show.

Mara Balodis of Florida, shown here, will have her hand-painted, nautical canvas bags.

New Arts at Navy Point artists include carver Bob Bohannon; Chesapeake workboat model maker John Raeder; photographer John Ellsworth; author and regional paddling expert Jeff Lowman; ceramic artists Sonny Fletcher, Rowe House Tiles, and Bogan Pottery; painters, Jo Houtz, Trish Doty, and Edwin L. Cook; bag maker Kelley Gravenor; and sculptor Whimsical Creations.

Other marine artists include Chesapeake Bay native, carver, and author Don Parks; naval architect and author Jay Benford, who designed the Patriot as seen in St. Michaels; chrome plating marine artist Jim Wade of Philadelphia, Pa.; and Jim Torbert, of Felton, De., with his “Land Yacht,”—a bright yellow bus that is hard to miss, carrying an extensive array of special types and sizes of rope for marine, agricultural and industrial purposes, with knotting and splicing services performed on site. Fawcett’s Boat Supplies will also be on hand to help boaters with on-site sales of merchandise and boating advice.

Ceramic artist Sonny Fletcher’s works will be among more than 60 juried artist’s nautical- and maritime-related works.

Those returning to Arts at Navy Point include carvers William Veasey, Bill Hickson, Ed Jacobs and Ed Kuhn; painters Mary Lou Troutman, Dave Murphy, and Grover Cantwell; photographers Joan Orme, Ellis Underkoffler and Joe Gruver; blacksmith Nick Vincent, model-makers Chuck Willey, John Into, and Nancy Price; boatbuilders and restorers George Hazzard, Jerry LeCompte, Joe Reid, and Will Ruhland, and canvas and sail makers Scott & Shannon Simmons.

A complete and updated list of Arts at Navy Point marine artists and craftspeople is at bit.ly/artsnavypoint17.

“Boat owners love this show because they can often source supplies found nowhere else,” commented CBC-ACBS’s John Into. “Boats and art might seem like an odd mix, until you see the beautiful mahogany and chrome boats. As you learn about what was involved in restoring them to their original condition—sometimes from unrecognizable hulks—these boats, and their restorers, can also be viewed as art and artisans, respectively.”

Joan and Michael Devaney glass art will be part of The Arts at Navy Point.

The Arts at Navy Point will be open throughout the three-day Antique & Classic Boat Festival, with exhibitors located under the big tent on CBMM’s Navy Point, as well as in the Small Boat Shed exhibition building and throughout the 18-acre Mile River waterfront campus.

CBMM’s 18-acre waterfront campus is located on what has been referred to as “Navy Point” since the mid-19th century, before seafood packing houses, bugeyes, and buyboats lined the working waterfront of St. Michaels. St. Michaels native and U.S. Navy Veteran Purser Samuel Hambleton named the area in honor of his service under Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry.

Festival hours are Friday from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.; Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.; and Father’s Day, Sunday from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. The festival includes two-day admission to all of CBMM’s special and permanent exhibitions, including the 1879 Hooper Strait Lighthouse, where guests can climb to the top for views of the Miles River and St. Michaels harbor. The event is $5 for CBMM adult members, or $18 for adults; $15 for seniors and students with ID; and $6 for children 6-17.

Scenic river cruises aboard CBMM’s 1920 buyboat Winnie Estelle will be offered throughout the festival, with boat rides and food an additional cost. For safety reasons, non-service dogs are prohibited at CBMM festivals. Festival parking for all three days and a Saturday shuttle service are free, with CBMM a short walk to specialty shops, restaurants, inns, bed & breakfasts, and other attractions in St. Michaels’ historic district. For advanced tickets and more information, visit bit.ly/boatfestival17 or call 410-745-2916.