CBMM Announces Next Restoration Project

The Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum has officially announced its next major shipyard project—a restoration of the 1912 tug Delaware. The restoration will begin with lofting this winter—following the launch of the 1889 bugeye Edna E. Lockwood in October 2018—and start in earnest in January 2019.

“This is a full stem-to-stern restoration,” said CBMM Shipwright James Del Aguila, who will serve as lead on the project. “We’re excited to get started.”

With work taking place in full public view, CBMM’s shipwrights and apprentices will begin work on Delaware’s keel, stem, and horn timber in early 2019, then progress to framing and planking in the latter half of the year. Work on deck structures will follow, with the project anticipated to take two years.

Built in Bethel, Del., by William H. Smith, Delaware once hauled scows on Broad Creek—often laden with lumber—and towed ram schooners to and from Laurel, Del. Occasionally, she carried parties of young people to Sandy Hill for day trips on the Nanticoke River. Donated to CBMM by Bailey Marine Construction in 1991, Delaware is now a member of the floating fleet on display along CBMM’s waterfront campus.

“This is a truly exciting time for CBMM, thanks in large part to the flurry of activity in our shipyard,” said CBMM President Kristen Greenaway. “Working on these unique vessels helps us further tell the story of the Chesapeake Bay. We can’t wait to share them with our guests.”

To learn more about this, and other shipyard projects, visit cbmm.org. For details on the progress and relaunch of Edna Lockwood, visit ednalockwood.org.

Recommission your Engine at CBMM in April

The Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Md., has planned two workshops in April to help boaters ready their engines for boating season.

On Wednesday, April 25, from 5:30– 8:30pm, Recommissioning Your Outboard Motor will lead participants through checking the engine’s running condition and temperature, ignition and starting systems, and demonstrate how to replace the engine’s fuel filter. A second workshop, from 9am–noon on Saturday, April 28, will do the same for boats with inboard engines.

Both workshops will be led by Josh Richardson, CBMM’s marine mechanic. Richardson comes to CBMM with 15 years of experience working in marine mechanics, and is a graduate of the Marine Mechanics Institute of Orlando, Fla.

Each workshop costs $25 for CBMM members and $35 for non-members. To register for the outboard motor workshop, visit cbmm.org/outboardrecommission. To register for the inboard workshop, visit cbmm.org/inboardrecommission. For a list of all upcoming shipyard programs, visit cbmm.org.

Hands-on Fun at CBMM’s Family Day this Spring

On Saturday, April 21, the public is invited to Family Day at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Md. From 10am–2pm, guests can follow a special Quest Card to explore family-friendly exhibits and enjoy hands-on activities along CBMM’s 18-acre campus.

Families can examine the critters living on an oyster reef, learn to take photos like Robert de Gast, and help construct a dugout canoe. Guests can dress as a lighthouse keeper and explore what life was like for those who worked in the 1879 Hooper Strait Lighthouse, before climbing to the top for a bird’s-eye view.

All of the day’s activities are free for CBMM members and are included with regular admission for museum guests, with no advanced registration needed. Educators can receive free family admission for the day by registering at cbmm.org/familyday. All pre-registered educators must provide credentials at check-in, such as certification or school/employer ID, to receive complimentary family admission.

Established in 1965, the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum is a world-class maritime museum dedicated to preserving and exploring the history, environment, and people of the entire Chesapeake Bay, with the values of relevancy, authenticity, and stewardship guiding its mission. Serving more than 80,000 guests each year, CBMM’s campus includes a floating fleet of historic boats and 12 exhibition buildings, situated in a park-like, waterfront setting along the Miles River and St Michaels harbor. Charitable gifts to The Annual Fund enable CBMM to educate and inspire the next generation of Chesapeake Bay stewards, and can be made online at cbmm.org/donate.

From now through October, CBMM guests can see the log-hull restoration of the 1889 bugeye, Edna E. Lockwood, with more information at ednalockwood.org. For more information about CBMM, visit cbmm.org.

Boater Safety Courses Begin April 18 in St. Michaels

The Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum is offering five, two-day Maryland DNR-approved boater safety courses, beginning on select dates in April and continuing through August.

The courses will be held from 6:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. each day in CBMM’s Van Lennep Auditorium, and run April 18-19, May 23-24, June 20-21, July 18-19, and August 15-16.  The cost is $25 per two-evening session, with space limited and pre-registration required.

Participants completing the course and passing the test will receive a Maryland Boating Safety Education Certificate, which is valid for life. The certificate is required for anyone born on or after July 1, 1972, and who operates a numbered or documented vessel on Maryland waters. The course is also recommended for anyone looking to become a safer, more experienced boater or personal water craft operator.

Participants must be twelve years of age and older, with early registration recommended as classes fill fast. To register, go to bit.ly/safeboating2018 and pick from dates listed.

For information on Maryland DNR’s boating safety program, visit dnr.maryland.gov/boating.

Kent’s Carvers and Clubs Opens at CBMM April 14

Kent’s Carvers and Clubs: Guides, Gunners and Co-Ops is a new waterfowling exhibition opening Saturday, April 14, 2018 at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Md.

The exhibition shares the stories of Maryland’s Kent County carvers and hunting clubs through a collection of decoys, oral histories, historic photographs, and other artifacts.

In the Rock Hall area of Kent County, virtually every young man grew up learning to hunt waterfowl in the early 1900s. That intimate knowledge of birds, their habits and their habitat translated into a marketable skill as gunning became the pastime of the wealthy. Rich photo documentation from the 1930s and 40s illustrate the camaraderie of the well-to-do business and professional men who flocked to Kent’s gunning shores to spend icy mornings in booby blinds, awaiting the arrival of ducks and geese and warm evenings by the club woodstove, where they feasted on local delicacies.

Two duck hunters take aim from a “booby” blind on the lower Chester River, c. 1950. Photo by A. Aubrey Bodine © Jennifer B. Bodine, courtesy of aaubreybodine.com.

Oral history excerpts reveal the stories of hardworking guides, who found vital supplemental seasonal income. Captain John Glenn fashioned hand-chopped decoys from his Piney Neck home, “Decoy Farm,” and began to work with other local carvers to supply a wide variety of stool. While the “Rock Hall School of Carvers” was likely influenced by the work of Susquehanna Flats decoy makers, Kent carver Charlie Joiner learned directly from legendary Havre de Grace carver R. Madison Mitchell, and befriended the Ward brothers of Crisfield, developing his own distinct and notable style.

“Kent County’s bountiful waterfowl population and picturesque shorelines drew gentlemen hunters from the cities to organized gunning clubs, especially along the shores near Rock Hall and Eastern Neck,” said CBMM Collections Manager Jenifer Dolde, curator of the exhibition. “Knowledgeable local men served as guides, savvy property owners leased their land for clubs, and skillful Kent carvers created co-ops to craft decoys for the rigs of neighbors and club members.”

“Kent County has an enduring waterfowling culture—one that continues to flourish in the fields, necks and islands of the deeply-rural region,” said CBMM Chief Curator Pete Lesher. “We’re grateful for the support of this exhibition to be able to explore this important part of Chesapeake history with our guests.”

Kent’s Carvers and Clubs: Guides, Gunners and Co-Ops is generously sponsored by Judy and Henry Stansbury, and the world’s leading decoy auction firm, Guyette & Deeter. Entry to the exhibition is free for CBMM members or with general admission. Kent’s Carvers and Clubswill travel to the Waterfowl Festival in Easton, Md.November 9-11, 2018, and return to CBMM’s Waterfowling Building through March 31, 2019.

Established in 1965, the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum is a world-class maritime museum dedicated to preserving and exploring the history, environment, and culture of the entire Chesapeake Bay, with the values of relevancy, authenticity, and stewardship guiding its mission. Serving more than 70,000 guests each year, CBMM’s campus includes a floating fleet of historic boats and numerous indoor and outdoor spaces, situated in a park-like, waterfront setting along the Miles River and St Michaels harbor. Charitable gifts to CBMM’s annual fund help support the non-profit’s exhibition, education, and restoration programs, with online giving and more information at cbmm.org/donate.

From now through October, 2018, CBMM’s guests can experience the log-hull restoration of the 1889 bugeye, Edna E. Lockwood, with more information at ednalockwood.org.

CBMM Welcomes Four New Staff Members

The Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Md., has announced four recent additions to its staff.

Joining the team are Barry Raymond as Assistant Guest Relations Manager, Laurel Seeman as Programs Administrative Assistant, Tom Shephard as Charity Boat Donation Program Associate, and Taylor Williams as Shipwright Educator.

A current Easton resident who grew up in Annapolis, Barry Raymond will assist with day-to-day operations of CBMM’s Welcome Center and Museum Store.

Raymond holds a Bachelor of Science in business management from Salisbury University, and has previously worked as an IT recruiter, new home sales manager, and bartender. He first connected with the Chesapeake Bay as a child while sailing and racing his family’s S2 30 sailboat, and has volunteered for CASA of the Mid-Shore.

Laurel Seeman will provide CBMM’s education department with administrative support for programming and volunteer events. A Grasonville resident originally from Columbus, Ohio, she earned a degree from Eastern Michigan University, and has work experience in art galleries, libraries, and as a museum docent.

Top L-R: Barry Raymond, Laurel Seeman; Bottom L-R: Tom Shephard, Taylor Williams

Seeman has done volunteer work for the Literacy Council of Anne Arundel County, the Junior League, Girl Scouts, and at Bacon’s Castle. She and her family moved to Maryland when she was 12, and her connection to the Bay came from crewing with her siblings on their father’s boat.

Tom Shephard will be working with the Charity Boat Donations Program, which accepts and sells all manner of craft year-round to support the children and adults served by CBMM’s education, curatorial, and boatbuilding programs.

Shephard joins CBMM after a career spent in the manufacturing sector. A New Jersey native, he’s attended CBMM’s Mid-Atlantic Small Craft Festival for a number of years, which help lead to his desire to re-locate, and has done volunteer work for the Traditional Small Craft Association,Citizens United to Protect the Maurice River Association,and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service through the endangered Swamp Pink program.

Taylor Williams is also joining CBMM’s education department and will be responsible for coordinating the Rising Tide Program. The program teaches students basic boatbuilding and woodworking skills in an effort inspire participants to develop a sense of self-confidence and pride and facilitate mentorships that provide guidance and support.

Williams comes to CBMM after spending the past five years managing a marina in Corpus Christi, Texas, where he also headed up boatbuilding, and boat repair and restoration operations. A native of Winchester, Va., he attended Old Dominion University and holds a Bachelor of Science in recreation and tourism management.

Williams grew up sailing and fishing the Chesapeake Bay on weekends with his father, and has a love for deadrise workboats, skipjacks and buyboats.

Established in 1965, the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum is a world-class maritime museum dedicated to preserving and exploring the history, environment and people of the entire Chesapeake Bay, with the values of relevancy, authenticity, and stewardship guiding its mission. Serving nearly 80,000 guests each year, CBMM’s campus includes a floating fleet of historic boats and 12 exhibition buildings, situated along the Miles River and St. Michaels’ harbor. For more information, visit cbmm.org.

Kick Off Boating Season April 12 at CBMM

Celebrate the beginning of boating season by joining the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Md. for the annual Blessing of the Fleet ceremony. The Thursday, April 12 ceremony begins at 5:00 p.m. near the shipyard, and invites the public to honor the working vessels and pleasure craft of the Chesapeake Bay, including CBMM’s floating fleet. Prayers will be offered to boaters for a safe and bountiful season, and also for those mariners whose lives have been lost at sea.

Easton High School’s NJROTC will begin the ceremony with a presentation of the colors, followed by the Star Spangled Banner and Navy Hymn. The blessing will be performed by the Reverend Kevin M. Cross of The Church of the Holy Trinity in Oxford, Md.

At this year’s event, a special blessing will be given for the 1912 river tug Delaware, which will undergo a major restoration in full public view at CBMM, beginning in late 2018. Delaware is a product of Bethel’s great age of wooden ship and boatbuilding and apart from the 1900 ram schooner Victory Chimes (formerly Edwin and Maud), may be the only survivor.

Delaware hauled scows on Broad Creek, often laden with lumber, and towed ram schooners to and from Laurel, De. Occasionally, she carried parties of young people to Sandy Hill for day trips on the Nanticoke River. Delaware hauled scows often laden with lumber and towed ram schooners up and down the Eastern Shore’s narrow, winding rivers. She was donated to CBMM in 1991 by Bailey Marine Construction, Inc.

“The Blessing of the Fleet is a terrific way to kick off the season for all boaters and guests,” said CBMM Director of Events Shannon Mitchell. “Our campus really starts to fill up in April, with a broad selection of educational programs and events for guests to engage in. We can’t wait to kick off the boating season and to see everyone.”

CBMM’s Blessing of the Fleet is free and open to the public, and will move into CBMM’s Small Boat Shed in the event of foul weather.

For more information, call 410-745-2916 or visit cbmm.org.

New Members Join CBMM’s Board of Governors

Richard Bodorff

The Board of Governors of the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum has welcomed three members to its governing body and approved its officers for 2018–2019.

Joining as new governors are Charles E. (Ned) Hennighausen and Scott R. Pastrick, with former governor Richard J. Bodorff returning to the Board. The newly elected officers are Diane Staley, chair; Frank C. Marshall, vice chair; Richard J. Johnson, treasurer; and Richard W. Snowdon, secretary. Retiring from the Board are Schuyler Benson, William S. Dudley, James P. Harris, and Francis Hopkinson, Jr.

Returning board member Richard Bodorff is a partner with Wiley Rein LLP in Washington, D.C. He received a BA, cum laude, in English literature from Denison University, and a JD from Vanderbilt University School of Law.

Bodorff is chief volunteer officer of the YMCA of the Chesapeake, an emeritus trustee of the Academy Art Museum, and a trustee of the Broadcasters Foundation of America in New York. He previously served as chairman of the boards of Commonwealth Public Broadcasting Corporation in Richmond, Va., and the Academy Art Museum in Easton, Md. He has also served on the boards of Denison University, America’s Public Television Stations, and Pickering Creek Audubon Center.

He and his wife, Ellen, cruise the Chesapeake on a Sabre 38, following nearly three decades as sailors. He is the immediate past commodore of the Poplar Islands Yacht Club.

Ned Hennighausen

New governor Ned Hennighausen was born in Baltimore, where his father’s family had resided since the 1850s, though his Eastern Shore roots trace back six generations. His family members still own the Centreville farm where his mother was raised, and as a young boy, Hennighausen spent weekends and summers aboard the family sailboat, which was moored in Worton Creek.

For more than 40 years, Hennighausen held senior and executive operations management positions in high speed consumer products manufacturing. His professional life took him to numerous locations across the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. He was employed by Campbell Soup Company, ConAgra Foods, and Lorillard, Inc.

Since moving to the Eastern Shore, Hennighausen has become involved with CBMM’s Rising Tide program as a volunteer. He lives in Oxford with his wife of 35 years, Joan, and their eight-month old chocolate Lab, Molly. He and Joan cruise the Chesapeake in a Hinckley T48.

Scott Pastrick is president and chief executive officer of Prime Policy Group. He began his work in Washington with the Carter Administration as the special assistant to the Assistant Secretary in the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Legislative Affairs. Following his position in the administration, he went on to serve as staff director in the U.S. House of Representatives. In 1984, he served as the deputy finance director for Vice President Walter Mondale’s campaign for president and senior adviser to Vice President Biden during his bid for the Democratic presidential nomination.

Scott Pastrick

Throughout Pastrick’s career he has served at the Democratic National Committee. In 1994, he was appointed to the National Finance Committee and the Site Selection Committee. In 1995, he was elected treasurer of the Democratic National Committee and an officer of the Executive Committee, which he served through the successful re-election of President Clinton. Pastrick served as a senior advisor to both the 1992 and 1996 presidential campaigns of Bill Clinton and, in 1992, headed the congressional’ outreach effort for then Governor Clinton.

Pastrick serves as the chairman of the Board of Catholic Charities, Gonzaga College High School and the Kennedy Center’s Fortes Trust. He is also a member of the board of the International Foundation for Election Systems and the Monumental Scholars Foundation, and previously served on the Board of Advisors of the Winston Churchill Library and the University of Maryland School of Public Policy.

A native of Indiana, Pastrick was awarded the Sagamore of the Wabash Award by the governor for distinguished service, counsel, and leadership. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Wabash College in political science and completed graduate work in political science at the George Washington University and the Indiana University School of Law. He resides in Chevy Chase, Md., with his wife, Courtney Clark Pastrick. They have five children— Carter and her husband, Bryan; Cameron and her husband, Jake; and Clark— and two grandchildren, Winnie and Nell.

Established in 1965, the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum is a world-class maritime museum dedicated to preserving and exploring the history, environment and people of the entire Chesapeake Bay, with the values of relevancy, authenticity, and stewardship guiding its mission. Serving nearly 80,000 guests each year, CBMM’s campus includes a floating fleet of historic boats and 12 exhibition buildings, situated along the Miles River and St. Michaels’ harbor. For more information, visit cbmm.org.

Scofield Retires After Three Decades at CBMM

Richard Scofield of Royal Oak, Md., has retired from the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum after more than 30 years of service.

Working on boats since he was 12 in his hometown of Stamford, Conn., Scofield has been connected to the Chesapeake region his entire life. Spending summers on the family farm in St. Michaels, he has been on a sailboat as long as he can remember. He joined CBMM’s shipyard during the summer of 1980, and after four years at Higgins Yacht Yard in St. Michaels, he returned under Tom Howell as a full-time rigger, painter, and shipwright in 1985. In 2005, Scofield became the shipyard’s manager, and in 2011, was appointed Assistant Curator of Watercraft.

His responsibilities included curating and maintaining CBMM’s collection of historic Chesapeake Bay watercraft—the largest in the world. In addition to assisting with many of CBMM’s exhibition and restoration projects, he oversees the maintenance and crew of the 1920 buyboat, Winnie Estelle, which takes passengers and school groups out on scenic river and ecology cruises throughout the warmer months.

“Richard has been on our staff longer than any other staff member in the history of CBMM,” said Chief Curator Pete Lesher. “His depth of knowledge about our historic boats and the stewardship he exercised toward them is inestimable. In numerous ways, he is simply irreplaceable.”

Scofield began working on boats as a child in his great-uncle’s boatyard in Stamford, Conn. He later went on to earn his Bachelor of Arts in psychology from Bates College in Lewiston, Maine. Two days after graduation, however, he found work restoring and crewing on Gleam—the oldest, active 12-meter sailboat in the world—and hasn’t stopped working the trade since.

Scofield has been connected to CBMM since its 1965 beginnings, when his grandparents’ close friends, Vida and Gus Van Lennep, helped found the museum.

Over his career, Scofield has seen CBMM grow from a small local museum to an internationally recognized institution, today drawing more than 80,000 guests annually.  Reflecting on his service with CBMM, Scofield is most proud of keeping CBMM’s collection of boats maintained and afloat for more than 30 years, and of its professional shipwright apprentice program.

“Teaching the next generation, knowing the skills will be there to maintain boats like ours—that’s so important,” Scofield said. “Now, graduates from boatbuilding schools are seeking experiences with us, and often are competing for these opportunities among their peers.

“At the end of the day, it’s still all about doing something different. Teaching people, helping them appreciate the Chesapeake Bay, and its culture, and its history.”

Bronze Casting Workshop March 15-17 in St. Michaels

From Thursday, March 15, through Saturday, March 17, the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Md., is offering a three-day bronze casting workshop in its working shipyard. Held from 9am-4pm on all three days, the workshop is for participants ages 16 and older, with class-size limited and advanced registration needed.

Participants will join nationally renowned sculpture artist and Shepherd University professor Christian Benefiel as he teaches the intricacies of casting bronze and aluminum, including creating molds, working the sand and furnace, and pouring molten metal. Participants will take home a working knowledge of casting metal along with their own creation.

The workshop is $425 for CBMM members, and $475 for non-members, with materials included in the registration fee. To sign up, visit cbmm.org/bronzecasting.