About Dave Wheelan

A Serious Warning from Horn Point Lab: Director Mike Roman Talks of Climate and Sea Levels

Yesterday afternoon, the President of the United States travelled to the Environmental Protection Agency’s headquarters in Washington to sign a number of executive orders to gut his predecessor’s hallmark Clean Power Plan and nullifying many of this country’s climate change efforts, reviving its coal industry, and, as the New York Times pointed out this morning, “effectively cede American leadership in the international campaign to curb the dangerous heating of the planet.”

There could be no better backdrop to the Spy’s recent interview with Michael Roman, director of the University of Maryland’s Horn Point Laboratory,  who, in no uncertain terms, warns of the grave consequences of these anti-science actions and policies, which will have profound consequences for the entire Chesapeake Bay ecological system.

From this very candid and forthright interview with Mike, we learn first hand from one of the most respected research centers in the world of the devastating impact that would take place with President Trump’s new initiatives to seriously dilute, if not completely withdraw, America’s pledge to honor the historic 2015 Paris Agreement to reduce America’s greenhouse gas emissions by more than one quarter below 2005 levels by 2025. 

This video is approximately six minutes in length. For more information about the Horn Point Laboratory and its mission please go here.

 

Welcome to the 21st Century Mid-Shore ​Health Care with Dr. Marc Zubrow

Approximately a year ago or so, there was a good bit of anxiety on the Mid-Shore about the plans of the region’s two major hospitals in Chestertown and Easton. In Chestertown, there was a growing fear that UM Regional Shore Health would eventually eliminate the existing hospital and replace it with an urgent/emergency care center. While in Easton there were increased concerns that Shore Health would abandon its plans for a new hospital.

Those community apprehensions turned out to be fortunately unfounded thanks to a combination of the politicians interceding to create a state study group on rural hospitals and a more stable economic climate which allowed for the advancement of a new hospital near the Easton Airport.

But one of the major takeaways of these two episodes was how profoundly attached communities are with their local hospitals. For a variety of reasons, including interest in patient comfort, proximity, and in some cases, mere nostalgia, residents were determined to fight to keep their local facilities alive and functioning.

The other takeaway, perhaps not as well noticed by many, was the increasing awareness that through advanced technology and efficiency, there is an emerging radically new way to provide health care in the 21st-century and is the growth of telemedicine.

The Spy, which has had an ongoing curiosity about the use of technology and how it may impact rural health delivery, was lucky enough to secure an interview with Marc Zubrow, Vice President, Telemedicine and Medical Director, eCare in charge of telemedicine for the entire University of Maryland Medical System. And in our interview, Dr. Zubrow makes a compelling case why this use of remote medical consultation will be dramatically improving patient care and outcomes regardless of location.

This video is approximately six minutes in length. For more information about UMMS and telemedicine please go here

Mid-Shore Arts: Kevin Garber and His Birds

Kevin Garber’s road to the Eastern Shore, like many artists, was not a direct one. A native of Pennsylvania, Kevin headed west rather than stay on the East Coast to pursue his career in the fine arts, and eventually became a professor of printmaking and drawing at Washington University in St. Louis. And in that capacity, he was part of the famed Island Press, perhaps the most highly respected printmaking workshop in the country.

During that time, Garber was at the forefront of some of the innovative printing techniques that pushed printmaking into the high ranks of contemporary visual arts in the 1980s and 1990s. Working alongside such renowned American artists as Nick Cave, Tom Friedman, Willie Cole, and Ann Hamilton, Kevin devoted most of his energy to the workshop and his students and put on hold his lifelong passion for drawing and painting birds.

But after decades in St. Louis, Kevin, and his wife, Kathy Bosin, made the difficult decision to return to the Mid-Atlantic to be closer to aging parents in 2008. And with that move, Kevin finally returned to his first love of capturing birds on canvas.

The results of that return can now be seen at the Trippe-Hilderbrandt Gallery in Easton this month. From large scale watercolor monoprints to tiny renderings of birds from around the world, Garber practices his drawing skills and mark-making with these simple shapes to indicate a more complex view of the natural world.

The Spy spent a few minutes with Kevin at the Bullitt House last week to talk about his birds and his return to painting.

This video is approximately two minutes in length. There will be an opening reception on Friday April 7 from 5-8 during Easton’s First Friday Gallery Walk. The Trippe-Hilderbrandt is located at 23 N Harrison Street. For more information, please go here 

Mid-Shore Education: Chesapeake College’s Clay Railey

Given Clay Railey’s resume, including a doctorate in English from Vanderbilt, a long teaching career at Chesapeake College, and more recently, being provost of Bucks County Community College, it was not a total surprise that he was appointed vice president of academic affairs of the Wye Mills community college in 2016.

But perhaps missing in that background was another experience that could be seen as a real asset for the job of stewarding the college’s educational goals. And that was the not too trivial fact that Dr. Railey had been a Jesuit priest for twenty years before his move into public education. And while the order’s renowned reputation for scholarship and intellectualism may have little day to day impact on Chesapeake College, there can be very little doubt the Railey remains true to the Jesuit mission of “cura personalis,” which is Latin for “care for the whole person.”

From students moving forward with workforce career training to those on a traditional liberal arts academic track, Clay Railey is redesigning Chesapeake College’s approach with that “whole person” in mind.

In our first Spy interview with Clay, he talks about some of those redesign plans and programs that significantly expand Chesapeake College’s special mission of training the Mid-Shore adults for 21st Century jobs and opportunities.

This video is approximately four minutes in length. For more information about Chesapeake College please go here

 

Maryland 3.0: Sprouts Starts to Take Over the Eastern Shore

Just so you know….perhaps one of the most significant “foodie” experiments in the country is taking place on the Mid-Shore.

A young couple, primarily trained in nutritional science and fitness, decide to escape the rat race of the Western Shore and relocate to Trappe to start a food delivery business dedicated to high quality prepared meals with locally sourced produce and meat.

The concept was simple. Rather than send clients the raw materials to make a nutritious meal (think Blue Apron), Sprout owners Ryan and Emily Groll would take it to the next level and actually cook the meals for its customers.

Sprout would do all the work. Whether it be breakfast, lunch, dinner, or even a snack, Ryan and Emily identify local farmers within a 200-mile range that produce some of the most exquisite examples of fruit, vegetables, chicken, pork, or beef in the region to produce meals that could be left at your doorstep twice a week.

Fast-forward one year later Sprouts has become an increasingly important provider on the entire Eastern Shore as well is in Annapolis. With Ryan’s mother in Chestertown, the couple continues to seek a local partner to help as a delivery station, which they call a “Sproutlet,” but they hope to cover the entire Mid-Shore within the next two years.

The Spy spent some quality time with Ryan in his portable kitchen in Trappe to discuss the couple’s courage and conviction it took to start a business of this kind and their aspirations over the next few years.

This video is approximately four minutes in length. For more information about Sprouts please go here

Mid-Shore Education: The Homeschooling Option with Denise Chapman-Toth

With serious debates going on about the quality of public education and expensive private education, it is easy sometimes to overlook the third option for parents and their children when it comes to elementary and secondary education. And that is the possibility of homeschooling.

At present, close to 700 families have selected this option rather than sending their children to various public and private schools on the Mid-Shore. That sparked our curiosity about what it takes to have a successful homeschool program and the kind of commitment it requires from one or both parents during the year, and that is why we were able to track down Denise Chapman-Toth, president of the Home Educators of the Eastern Shore, to talk about this rarely used but relatively successful alternative to mainstream education programs.

In our Spy interview, Denise talks about her own experience over the last sixteen years in homeschooling her children, as well as the satisfaction of having two of them move on to higher education and be on the honor roll. She also talks about the mechanics of starting a homeschool program for your children and the kind of typical day required for parent teachers.

This video is approximately six minutes in length. For more information about the Home Educators of the Eastern Shore please go here.

Maryland 3.0: St. Michaels Very Own ‘Click and Clack’ Mike Kealy

For those who still mourn the departure of “Car Talk” on National Public Radio and its beloved hosts, the”Click and Clack” brothers (Tom and Ray Magliozzi), Spy readers might find it comforting to know that perhaps one of their long lost brothers can be found in St. Michaels at Bay Hundred Automotive.

While it’s not a total match, Mike Kealy, the owner of the repair shop, comes pretty darn close despite being younger and possessing a Long Island accent rather than a Boston one.

And like the Magliozzi brothers, Mike entered into the world of car repair with a college degree in engineering. In fact, Mike was drawn into the auto mechanics world in the early 1980s when manufacturing just started to use such things as fuel injection and other technologies that made it enjoyable for him. He also shares with the ‘Click and Clack’ boys an uncanny curiosity about cars, motors, and the incredibly sophisticated software that is now baked in our cars these days.

With family members moving to the Eastern Shore over the past few decades, Mike eventually decided to leave Long Island for St. Michaels without knowing a soul in town, but with a potent combination of entrepreneurship and a passion for working in a small town. With the help of such people like Buck Duncan, the president of the St. Michaels Bank at the time, and the devotion of a growing number of satisfied customers, Kealy was not only able to grow his business, including a new venture with his brother serving boats, but also built commercial rental properties alongside his shop on St. Michaels Road.

The Spy sat down with Mike to talk about the challenges that come with being a small repair shop in a world of well-financed car dealerships, including the need to have full access to critical software from car manufacturers. He also makes a compelling case to service your vehicle locally, regardless of age, as he unveils the hidden truth about car parts and dealer service departments.

This video is approximately four minutes in length. For more information about Bay Hundred Automotive please go here

Ecosystem: Midshore Riverkeepers in Talbot County Classrooms as well as Rivers

No doubt, the most visible and every present sign of the Midshore Riverkeeper Conservancy’s work is when one spots their clearly-identified patrol boats on the Choptank, Miles or Wye Rivers. For almost ten years, the MRC has made it their mission to advocate and protect those rivers through careful monitoring and partnerships with farmers and watermen in the region.

But that is only half of the story of what the MRC does in Talbot County. As an organization committed as much to education as to conservation, the Riverkeeper Conservancy has been working for the last four years with Talbot County Public Schools to bring a unique awareness and appreciation to its students.

The Spy wanted to see firsthand what kind of educational programming this looked like and quickly jumped at an invitation to observe MRC education coordinators Elle O’Brien and Suzanne Sullivan at St. Michaels Middle High School last week on oyster harvesting. Hosted by science teacher Lauren Greer’s 9th-grade environmental education class, the two MRC staffers work with students in the classroom, as well as outside, to learn the importance of sustainability over the semester.

This video is approximately three minutes in length. For more information on the Midshore Riverkeeper Conservancy please go here.

 

Senior Nation: The Science of Forgetfulness with Dr. Constantine Lyketsos

The celebrated poet Billy Collins wrote in one of his poems that his memory had retired “to the southern hemisphere of the brain, to a little fishing village where there are no phones.”  It is perhaps one of the most accurate descriptions of memory loss and the disorientation it causes in almost every human being of a certain age from time to time.

But what if the feeling of “no phones” was a more permanent condition?  That beyond the simple and temporary experience of forgetting where one left the car keys, one also could not remember what those car keys do. In that case, the condition is called dementia. And what has intrigued Johns Hopkins doctor Constantine Lyketsos is why those “phones,” the neurochemistry of the brain, are not working.

On March 8, the Talbot Hospice will be sponsoring a lecture by one of the leading experts in dementia and Alzheimer’s disease at Easton High School. Dr. Lyketsos, from the Hopkins department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, will address these issues and the devastating effects of the illness, but also promising new treatments that give hope to patients and their families.

The Spy traveled to Baltimore to sit down with Lyketsos before the event for a primer on dementia and memory loss.

This video is approximately six minutes in length. For more information about the event please go here

 

Profiles in Philanthropy: Trustee Dick Bodorff on the Academy, CBMM, and the YMCA

Periodically, the country’s new president has referred to some his cabinet appointments as coming from “central casting.” Using his unique phrasing, President Trump is clearly referring to a person who is a perfect fit to a particularly difficult position to fill.

That definition could very easily apply to Talbot County’s Richard Bodorff and the extraordinary roles he has played on local Talbot County nonprofit boards.

A Washington DC lawyer during the week, with an exceptional background in the world of the federal communications law and regulations, Dick and his wife have made Talbot County their second home the last seventeen years. But rather than simply pursue his love of boating and other recreation activities while in residence, Dick made it a point to truly invest in his adopted community by joining several important governing boards of local nonprofit organizations and bringing with him his special skills and Midwestern common sense.

The Spy sat down with Dick a few weeks ago at Bullitt House to talk about his background in communications starting as a kid growing up in Illinois, followed by a early career at the Federal Communications Commission, including work on the famous George Carlin “seven words” controversy, and eventually his role as partner at the law firm of Wiley, Rein, advising clients on the FCC’s incentive spectrum auction and regulatory advice. He currently serves on the boards Academy Art Museum, Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum, YMCA of the Chesapeake and shares his thoughts on those organization and what it meant to be successful nonprofit organization.

This video is approximately nine minutes in length