Tell the FCC: Restore Net Neutrality

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An appeals court just dealt the latest blow to the open Internet. The court struck down the Federal Communications Commission’s Open Internet Order because of the questionable legal framework the agency used when it adopted its Net Neutrality rules in 2010.

This ruling means there is no one who can protect us from ISPs that block or discriminate against websites, applications or services.

But there’s hope: FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler can correct the agency’s past mistakes and truly protect our nation’s communications infrastructure. The agency must take the necessary steps to make broadband networks open, accessible, reliable and affordable for everyone.

Tell the FCC to start treating broadband like a communications service, and to restore its Net Neutrality rules.

Go here to send the FCC a message.

AG Gansler: Utah Same-sex Marriages are Valid in Maryland

By: Doug Gansler

In response to a request from the Human Right Campaign, Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler has expressed his view that recent same-sex marriages legally performed in Utah should and would be recognized in Maryland. This week the United States Supreme Court issued a stay on performing such unions in Utah after a court ruling there struck down a same-sex marriage ban. As a result of that decision, Utah determined same-sex marriages to be legal and, for 17 days, more than 1300 such marriage licenses were issued until the stay by the Supreme Court ended the practice.

“Maryland will continue to recognize valid out-of-state same-sex marriages as we continue to strengthen the Constitution’s promise of equal protection under the law,” said Attorney General Gansler. “It is an affront to the idea of basic human rights that the battle for full marriage equality in this country remains in headlines and courtrooms.”

The Obama administration today also issued a statement saying that the federal government would recognize same-sex unions performed in Utah despite the fact that the state government of Utah is refusing to do.

From the letter by Attorney General Gansler to Chad Griffin, President of the Human Rights Campaign:

Although Utah officials have stated that no new marriages may be solemnized, and that the state would not recognize the already-solemnized marriages for purposes of providing additional state benefits, we are not aware of any court ruling or position of the Utah Attorney General that such marriages are no longer legally valid.  In fact, the Utah Attorney General has made clear that the marriages at issue are valid for purposes of providing “proper documentation in states that recognize same-sex marriage.”

 And,

Nevertheless, as courts and legislatures accord same-sex couples the dignity and humanity they deserve, we as a nation move closer to fulfilling the Constitution’s promise of equal protection of the law.  Maryland will continue to recognize valid out-of-state same-sex marriages as we continue to advance that effort wherever and whenever we can.

To see the letter from Attorney General Gansler to The Human Rights Campaign visit:

http://www.oag.state.md.us/Press/Human_Rights_Campaign_Letter.pdf

To see the letter from The Human Rights Campaign to Attorney General Gansler and 17 other attorneys general visit: http://www.oag.state.md.us/Press/HRC_Letter_to_State_AGs.pdf

To see the Attorney General’s 2010 Opinion on same-sex marriage visit: http://www.oag.state.md.us/Opinions/2010/95oag3.pdf

MEDIA CONTACTS:

David Paulson - 410-576-6357
dpaulson@oag.state.md.us

Alan Brody –  410-576-6956
abrody@oag.state.md.us

Terra Voce To Perform At Easton’s Christ Church

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Picture1_edited-1On Sunday, January 12, the Christ Church Concert Series will present the acclaimed Terra Voce flute and cello duo at 4:00 p.m.  Known for its lively and creative programs, Terra Voce  combines the diverse and the unexpected testing the limits of what is possible on just two instruments.  Cellist Andrew Gabbert and flutist Elizabeth Brightbill thrill audiences with their virtuosity, engaging, conversational style of presentation, and their genre-expanding programs that explore a wide range of musical styles, traditions, and cross-cultural influence.

In addition to numerous performances on college campuses and community concert series, Terra Voce has appeared on the Millennium Stage at the Kennedy Center, in the Christ Chapel Chamber Series at New York City’s Riverside Church, and as finalists in the National Flute Association’s Chamber Music Competition. Along with three other flute and cello duos, Terra Voce has formed a commissioning circle and premiered this consortium’s first commission, Dviraag by Asha Srinivasan in 2009. Subsequently, they performed this work at the 2010 Society of Composers National Conference to much acclaim.  Terra Voce is on the roster for the Virginia Commission for the Arts Residency Program. Their CD The Frost Is All Over was selected as an “Editor’s Pick” on CD Baby.

Terra Voce will perform on what is to be the fifth in a series of eight concerts for the 2013-2014 Christ Church Concert Series.  This particular concert is unique in that the setting will be that of a coffee house.  Taking place in the parish hall adjacent to the sanctuary, fresh coffee and pastry will be served making this event a cozy respite from the chilling weather on a January afternoon.  The concert is free and the public is invited to attend.   This series is sponsored in part by a grant from the Talbot County Arts Council with funds provided by the Maryland State Arts Council.  Christ Church is located at 111 S. Harrison Street in historic downtown Easton, MD.  For information call 410-822-2677.

 

 

Empty Bowls Community Dinner Set for February 23

Suzi  Peel, Karen Baker and Jerry Sweeney enjoying the 2013 Empty Bowls Community Dinner. (Enjoying the Dinner)
Suzi  Peel, Karen Baker and Jerry Sweeney enjoying the 2013 Empty Bowls Community Dinner. (Enjoying the Dinner)

Suzi Peel, Karen Baker and Jerry Sweeney enjoying the 2013 Empty Bowls Community Dinner. (Enjoying the Dinner)

The 6th annual Empty Bowls community dinner to benefit Talbot County food pantries will be held Sunday, Feb. 23, 2014, from 5 p.m. to 7 pm.  Presented by Empty Bowls, Talbot County the goal of the dinner, in the words of co-chair Anna Harding, “Is to recognize the very serious problem of hunger in our community and then find a way to help alleviate it on a local basis.”

In case of inclement weather the event will be held March 2. Tickets go on sale January 6, 2014.
Community support for the dinner continues to grow. The event has sold out for the past three years.  Last year over 220 people were served and the event raised a record- breaking $10,000. Since it began the event has raised over $36,000. All the money from ticket sales goes to the food pantries. The soups, bread, butter, desserts, flowers, music and printing are all donated by local individual and businesses. It is planned and staffed by volunteers.

Excited guests select their bowls and eagerly await the start of the dinner.

Excited guests select their bowls and eagerly await the start of the dinner.

Tickets must be bought in advance and can be purchased by mailing a check for $20 per person to the Mid-Shore Community Foundation, 102 E. Dover Street, Easton, MD 21601. Checks should be made payable to Mid-Shore/Empty Bowls.  A phone number should be included. Tickets can also be purchased at www.mscf.org. Then click on the “events” button at the bottom of the page. Donations can also be made either by check or on-line.
The dinner is held at Immanuel Lutheran Church Hall 7215 Ocean Gateway, Easton, MD 21601 (on the westbound lane of Rt. 50, west of the Maryland State Police barracks).
For the price of the ticket, dinner guests choose a bowl (to keep) from the hundreds that have been painted at Clay Bakers, donated by local potters, or, new this year, bowls made and decorated by art students  from Easton High School, St. Michaels Middle-High School and Easton Middle School.  The bowl selection process is a very special part of the event. With so many bowls to choose from, it’s not easy finding the perfect one!  Often people come looking for the bowl they or their family and friends have created. Once chosen, the bowl will be filled with soup from a wide selection of soups and chili (including vegetarian options).  Guests are welcome to enjoy unlimited servings.  Bread, cider and dessert round out the meal.
The cornerstone of this grassroots effort is the volunteers.  This includes the 25-30 generous soup makers affectionately called “soupers”.  Masterfully coordinated by souper-visor Susan Wilford, many of them have participated in every dinner. On the day of the event they parade into the venue bearing crock pots and tureens of steaming soups and chilis. Susan says “I love to participate because it fulfills my desire to be of service to the community. And, it has allowed me to meet so many new and incredibly generous people. Every year I contact the previous year’s soup makers and give them the opportunity to bow out. They rarely do.”  Local restaurants are also joining in the effort.  Last year Bartlett Pear restaurant contributed soup. This year it looks like the number of participating restaurants will increase at least eightfold.
An equally generous batch of volunteer bakers provide the dessert. Other volunteers, including high school students, handle the setting up and putting away of tables, chairs, decorations, bowls and all the accoutrements as well as hosting and serving at the dinner.
The proceeds from the dinner go entirely to local food pantries. This past spring members of the Empty Bowls committee personally delivered checks from the dinner’s proceeds to the pantries.  It brought home, yet again, both the need for the pantries and the dedication and innovation of those who volunteer at them.  At the Presbyterian Church pantry, we spoke with pantry volunteers Caroline Sproule and Mary Beth Goll, two of the 11 Mission Committee members that oversee the pantry. They said the pantry typically feeds 60-70 families a month and that the mission of the Mission Committee is to “Help those in need help themselves.” In keeping with the mission, a community run vegetable garden is underway.  Most of the 20 beds have been built and they expect to have church neighbors planting this spring.
After the dinner, pots that once held soup now clean and waiting to be reunited with the cooks that brought them

After the dinner, pots that once held soup now clean and waiting to be reunited with the cooks that brought them

The magnitude of the need the pantries serve may be surprising to many in the community. The Neighborhood Service Center is another of  the participating pantries. It serves about 300 families per month, each family representing from one to 10 people.  One of the center’s clients had this to say about the value of the service it provides: “This helps because of how food stamps and other benefits are being cut and by being a single veteran over 50 this really helps to supplement the benefits it makes it where you don’t always worry about your next meal. Thank you very much.”

 It is comments like these that prompted the event organizers to think about how they could raise more funds for the pantries. After all, only so much money could be raised from the dinner itself.  Co-chair Susan duPont said, “We need to think of ways that we can expand the event without losing the intimacy of the dinner and the community spirit.”   So, this year Empty Bowls is introducing a range of sponsorship opportunities.  “In the past we were fortunate to have a limited number of generous sponsors but this year we are making a concerted effort to increase that number,” said duPont.  Sponsorships start at $250 and increase from there.  Sponsors receive acknowledgement at the dinner and in other event materials.  As of December sponsors at the Dutch Oven Level ($1,000+) are Curry Wilford, senior vice president and financial advisor at Morgan Stanley, and Steven T. Hamblin. Sponsors at the Cup of Soup level ($250+) are the Easton Ruritan Club, Sherwood Ford of Salisbury, Wye Financial &Trust,  and Mr. and Mrs. J. Scott Wimbrow.  For information about sponsorship opportunities contact Susan duPont at susan.handy.dupont@gmail.com.
 Long-time Empty Bowls collaborator, Clay Bakers in Easton, is again supporting Empty Bowls by sponsoring special bowl decorating.  StartingJan. 1 and running through Feb. 18, 2014, for a price as low as $12, Clay Bakers’ customers can choose from a selection of bowls, which they paint in their own style. Talbot County Empty Bowls receives the decorated bowl and a portion of the fee. Bowl decorating groups of 10 or more can make an advance reservation. Clay Bakers is at 1 S. Washington Street in Easton. For more information, call 410-770-9091.
 Food pantries at Asbury Methodist Church, Scott’s United Methodist Church, St. Vincent de Paul Society, Neighborhood Service Center, Presbyterian Church, and the St. Michaels Food Pantry, among others, share the proceeds from the dinner.
 The Talbot County Empty Bowls event is modeled after the first fundraiser, the brainchild of John Hartom, a North Carolina high school art teacher. In 1990, Hartom challenged his art students to make enough ceramic bowls to host a meal for the school faculty. During the meal, Hartom and his wife, Lisa Blackburn, also an art educator, reminded the group that, even though they were not hungry because they had just eaten, many in the community still had empty bowls.
 The guests were invited to keep their soup bowls as a reminder of those less fortunate. This event evolved into the non-profit organization Empty Bowls, which now raises millions of dollars for hunger-related causes around the world. Co-chair Harding  states, “Our hope is that the bowl will remind you that someone else’s bowl is often empty and that you will be moved to continue to support  those organizations who are working every day to feed those in need in throughout Talbot  County.”

Evergreen Center Schedule Through March 2014

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Healing meditation group, with facilitator Penny Hadaway
1/5/2013, SUNDAY 1:30-3:00 p  Donations Welcome
Sunday meeting in Preston at Chesapeake NLP and Hypnosis, 136 Lednum Avenue Ste 2 Preston MD 21655; (410) 310-9992
Healing Meditations are designed to nourish your spirit and your being. Each month a different meditation will be presented, using guided exercises to .promote mental acuity, emotional health, physical health and well-being. The meditations vary from focusing inward to using meditative awareness in daily activities such as walking, driving or eating.  Penny Hadaway is a certified neurolinguist and, hypnotist. She worked In behavioral health for 26 years, establishing Chesapeake NLP and Hypnosis in 2005.

Healing meditation group, with Penny Hadaway
1/7/2013 MONDAY 6:30-8:00 pm Donations Welcome (At Evergreen A Center for Balanced Living 410-819-3395) Healing Meditations are designed to nourish your spirit and your being. Each month a different meditation will be presented, using guided exercises to .promote mental acuity, emotional health, physical health and well-being. The meditations vary from focusing inward to using meditative awareness in daily activities such as walking, driving or eating.  Penny Hadaway is a certified neurolinguist and, hypnotist. She worked In behavioral health for 26 years, establishing Chesapeake NLP and Hypnosis in 2005.

5 Elements Yoga  with S. D. Swan and Freya Farley
2nd & 4th THURSDAYS 1/9 & 23; 2/13 & 27; 3/13 & 27; 4/10 & 24, 12:30-2:00p
Member: $132 Nonmember: $142; (materials included)
This unique 5 Element Yoga program is designed to support the biological and energetic shifts we experience during seasonal changes.  Breathing, Stretching, and Tonification Practices as well as Chakra Energizing and Sense Nourishment specific to each season help to balance the nervous and endocrine systems that modulate biorhythms. Food choices and other lifestyle recommendations will be explored. Drop in: $20/session

Introduction to the Chakras: First Chakra – the Root Chakra with Marilyn Witkowski
1/12/14 SUNDAY 12p-4 pm Tuition: Member $50; Nonmember: $55
This introduction is the first in a series of seven classes. Each class focuses on all aspects of the respective chakra(s): location, color, organs, energy body, psychological age, relation to other chakras.  Students will have an opportunity to give and receive an Energy Healing treatment using the color frequency of the chakra discussed.  Wear comfortable clothing.
Remaining Classes:  2/9: Second Chakra; 3/9: Third Chakra; 4/6: Fourth Chakra; 5/4: Fifth Chakra; 6/8: 6th Chakra; 7/13: Seventh Chakra. Participants may register for all classes or an individual class as the classes is designed to be independent.  No prerequisites.

 

 
Zentangle Basics With Susan Green
1/13 MONDAY  6:30p-8:00 pm Tuition: Member: $35; Nonmember: $40 Includes $5 materials fee
How can a paper tile, a drawn string and several tangles help you to relax yet be focused? Zentangle is an easy-to-learn, relaxing, and fun way to create beautiful images by drawing structured, repetitive patterns from which beautiful images emerge.  Increased focus and creativity, provides artistic satisfaction. The Zentangle method is enjoyed all over this world by all ages, skill ranges, and interests.  Zentangle is a mindful practice that increases attentiveness and focus. It is easy to learn and easy to do.  Developed by Maria Thomas and Rick Roberts, learn more at their official site, www.zentangle.com.

T’ai Chi with Dell St. Ana
1/16 Thursdays  10 classes; 6:30p-7:45p Member: $112; Nonmember $122 (No Dropins)
For centuries people have used T’ai Chi to improve their energy and health. In this ten week class you will learn movements of the Yang style, short form of this practice. Please eat lightly or at least two hours before class. Wear loose, comfortable clothing. Snow makeup date: 3/27

Zentangle Basics with Susan Green
1/27 MONDAY 6:30p-8p 6:30p-8:00pm Tuition: Member: $35; Nonmember: $40 Includes $5 materials fee.
How can a paper tile, a drawn string and several tangles help you to relax yet be focused? Zentangle is an easy-to-learn, relaxing, and fun way to create beautiful images by drawing structured, repetitive patterns from which beautiful images emerge.  Increased focus and creativity, provides artistic satisfaction. The Zentangle method is enjoyed all over this world by all ages, skill ranges, and interests.  Zentangle is a mindful practice that increases attentiveness and focus. It is easy to learn and easy to do.  Developed by Maria Thomas and Rick Roberts, learn more at their official site, www.zentangle.com.

FEBURARY                                                                                 

Zentangle Intermediate with Susan Green
2/10 MONDAY Tuition: Member $30; Nonmember $35

In this intermediate class, you will learn more about strings, tangle enhancers, shading, and tangles requiring a deeper level of concentration. How can a paper tile, a drawn string and several tangles help you to relax yet be focused? Zentangle is an easy-to-learn, relaxing, and fun way to create beautiful images by drawing structured, repetitive patterns from which beautiful images emerge.  Increased focus and creativity, provides artistic satisfaction. The Zentangle method is enjoyed all over this world by all ages, skill ranges, and interests.  Zentangle is a mindful practice that increases attentiveness and focus. It is easy to learn and easy to do. Prerequisite: Zentangle Basics. Bring the Zentangle kit from the Zentangle Basics class.  Additional materials will be available for sale at the workshop.

 

Reiki I with Dell St. Ana
2/23     SUNDAY 10:30a-6:30 pm  Tuition $145

This day-long workshop will provide you with everything you need to become a Reiki practitioner. You will learn the history of Reiki, basic physical and energy anatomy, and the hand positions used to give a complete Reiki treatment to yourself and others. You will also receive the attunements that establish you as a channel for healing. Upon successful completion of the course, you will be given a personalized certificate that verifies your training and qualifies you to practice Reiki. If you are repeating this class, please contact Dell at (410) 822-3722 for tuition discount information. Please bring a bag lunch.

MARCH

3/23     10:30a- 4:30p  REIKI II (same tuition)

$177                   Dell             This class focuses on Reiki techniques for distance healing, including the distance healing symbols and attunements. If you are repeating this class, please contact Dell at 410-822-3722 for tuition discount information. Prerequisite: Level I training. Please bring a bag lunch and your Reiki Level I certificate.

St. Michaels Elves

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John Mautz, Aida Khalil, Marianne Stallsmith

The spirit of the holidays is still found in of St. Michaels not just in the glitz and shine of the lights that go through this town, but in the hearts and generosity of all those who participated in the Elves to Elders Program.

St. Michaels Events a nonprofit 501c3 decided to assist Santa this Christmas by organizing a drive to help those who sometimes get forgotten this time of year our local elders. With with the help from Saint Michaels Community Center, local St. Michael’s

businesses, & generous members of the community It was a success.

The Elves to Elders program came to a happy end after about 4 weeks of dedication, work, organizing, sorting & the delivery of a holiday basket on the 23rd of December. 23 community residents received a basket full of much needed goods.

The deliveries were made with the help of Marianne & Stan Stallsmith, Aida & Steve Trissell, Julie Imirie, Karen, John & Dan Mautz. They loaded up the Carpenter Street van and drove around delivering not only an unexpected basket but the spirit of the season sharing a hug and a smile, with our neighbors who often get forgotten.

Not only did this project help some of those in need but was able to help restock the St. Michaels Food Pantry, which is organized by the various churches in town. Our elves have managed to finish their Christmas list just in time as the pantry was half empty.

St. Michaels Events want to thank those who helped with this project and wishes everyone a safe and happy Holiday and a wonderful New Year!

AG Gansler Recommends Post-Holiday Advice & Tips for Consumers

By: Lindz Graham

Know your warranty rights, return policies and the rules about gift cards

Baltimore, MD (December 24, 2013) – As consumers head back to retailers after the holidays armed with returns, gift cards and products that just don’t work, Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler is offering some tips and advice that are in place to protect Marylanders, which will serve you well now and in the new year.

“Nothing takes the joy out of gift giving or receiving faster than having to quibble with a company over a refund or return, a defective product or a mind-boggling warranty plan,” said Attorney General Gansler. “Being informed about your consumer rights will ensure you don’t get taken advantage of by a combative retailer.”

The Attorney General’s Consumer Protection Division enforces refund and exchange rules and works to mediate disputes between consumers and businesses. To file a complaint or get more information, call the Mediation Unit hotline at 410-528-8662 or 888-743-0023. Consumers can also write to 200 St. Paul Place, 16th Floor, Baltimore, MD 21202 or file a complaint online at http://www.oag.state.md.us/Consumer/complaint.htm.

RETURNS, REFUNDS and EXCHANGES

Return policies can vary from store to store, but they must be:

  • Posted in the store or,
  • Printed on a receipt (online merchants must have their return policy posted on their web site).

If the retailer doesn’t have a posted policy or it is not printed on the receipt, the consumer may assume there are no refund limitations and must receive a merchandise exchange or a refund, as long as the item is in good condition. Also, if a purchased item is defective, the store is required to repair it, exchange it or give a refund, regardless of its return policy.

 

To avoid confusion, Attorney General Gansler advises consumers to ask a store employee or manager about its return policy if you don’t see it posted or on a receipt.

 

Also, know your time constraints and other limits, if any, on gift returns, refunds or exchanges:

  • Some retailers allow exchanges, returns or refunds at any time, while others impose a deadline.
  • Know beforehand if a receipt must be shown, and if only store credit is issued.
  • Some stores won’t accept returns if the product has been opened or limit how many returns a single consumer can make. Still other merchants do not accept any returns, even with a receipt.
  • When shopping online, consumers should look to see whether there is a shipping fee or a re-stocking fee for returned items. Such fees can be expensive and may drastically reduce the value of the gift.

GIFT CARDS

Gift cards, which have become as omnipresent in retail stores and supermarkets as more traditional gifts, have their own unique challenges and rules that retailers in Maryland must follow.

  • State law allows consumers at least 4 years from the date of purchase to use the card if it is a store-specific gift card (e.g. Starbucks, Costco, Macy’s) and can only be used to buy goods from that particular store and its affiliates.
  • During the 4 years, the issuer may not impose fees or charges.
  • Federal legislation adopted in 2009 extends expiration protection to 5 years, although consumers may be subject to fees during the fifth year.
  • Find out beforehand whether the remaining value of a gift card after a purchase can be received in cash and whether gift cards can be used online, as well as in-store.
  • Gift cards issued by banks and processed through a national credit or debit card service, such as American Express, MasterCard or Visa, offer more flexibility – most stores accept them – but these cards may have different protections.
  • If a bank card is not reloadable, federal legislation prevents expiration in less than 5 years, but fees may still apply once a month if there has been at least 1 year of inactivity.
  • Any terms or conditions regarding an expiration date or fee (service charge, inactivity fees or reload fees are among the most common) must be visibly printed on the card itself, on a sticker permanently affixed to the card or on an envelope containing the gift card.
  • Fees cannot be charged more than once a month and require that there is at least 1 year of inactivity on the card prior to being initially assessed. These terms may not be changed after the date of purchase unless it benefits the consumer.

DEFECTIVE MERCHANDISE

Defective merchandise is covered by an implied warranty – a guarantee that the item works when it is purchased — even if a store has a “No Refunds, No Exchanges” policy.

  • Implied warranties require that new and used goods are fit for sale and continue to function for a reasonable period of time.
  • If you buy a product that turns out to be defective, you have the right to have it repaired or replaced, or to get a refund.
  • A product may not be sold “as is” under Maryland’s implied warranty law, except used cars that have more than 60,000 miles and are more than six years old. Dealers selling a car “as is” must include a written disclosure stating that the implied warranty does not cover automobiles.

CONTACT:

Alan Brody - 410-576-6956

abroday@aog.state.md.us

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United Fund Makes First Disbursements of 2013-14 Campaign

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As 2013 wound down, the United Fund of Talbot County allocated $118,200,  the first of three distributions to its 2013-14  participating agencies. Representatives from the Fund’s 21 member agencies were on hand to receive their checks at the Fund’s office at 121 North Washington Street.  This year’s Fund appeal has generated contributions totaling 68% of the $400,000 goal so far.  “We are appreciative of the strong community support,” Ann Jacobs, United Fund of Talbot County Executive Director said, “and are optimistic that when all donations are counted, we will attain this year’s campaign goal by the close of our fiscal year in June, 2014.”

The 2013-14 UFTC participating agencies are: BAAM, Boy Scouts in Talbot County, CASA of Talbot County, Character Counts!,Critchlow Adkins Children’s Centers, Delmarva Community Services, For All Seasons, Girl Scouts of Talbot County; Mental Health Association in Talbot County, Mid-Shore Council on Family Violence, Mid-Shore Pro Bono, Neighborhood Service Center, Partners in Care, St. Martin’s Ministries, St. Michaels Community Center. Talbot Mentors, Tilghman Area Youth Association, Talbot Special Riders, and United Needs and Abilities (formerly Epilepsy Association of the Eastern Shore) and Upper Shore Aging.

 

 Ann Jacobs, United Fund Executive Director, displays the first disbursement check as participating agencies look on.

Ann Jacobs, United Fund Executive Director, displays the first disbursement check as participating agencies look on.

 

MD League of Conservation Voters Endorses Brian Frosh for AG

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Annapolis – The Maryland League of Conservation Voters endorsed state Senator Brian Frosh (District 16, Montgomery County) for Maryland Attorney General on Friday. Citing Senator Frosh’s legislative record, the group said it is excited to back a “long-time environmental champion” as its first endorsement for the 2014 election cycle.

“Marylanders have counted on Senator Frosh to clean up the Chesapeake Bay and local waterways, fight climate change, make our air safer to breathe, reduce trash and toxic pollution and conserve open spaces,” said Maryland League of Conservation Voters Executive Director Karla Raettig. “Attorney General Frosh will bring that same dedication and passion to protect all Maryland families.”

“Brian has been a tireless voice for our land, air and water – including the Chesapeake Bay,” said Governor Parris Glendening (1995-2003). “He’s also one of the hardest working public servants I know, and I am so excited for him to be our next Attorney General.”

Senator Frosh earned a 100 percent score on the Maryland League of Conservation Voters (LCV) 2013 legislative scorecard and has a 99 percent lifetime score. In recognition of his environmental record, Frosh received Maryland LCV’s John V. Kabler Memorial Award in 2003.

“The Attorney General plays an enormous role in defending and enforcing our environmental laws,” said Maryland LCV Board of Directors Chair Tony Caliguiri. “Electing a 100-percent green champion to this important office will help protect Maryland’s valuable natural resources and public health.”

First elected to the Maryland House of Delegates in 1987 and to the Senate in 1995, Senator Frosh has established himself as a leading environmental voice. His accomplishments include:

  • establishing the state’s recycling program
  • enacting a law to prohibit oil and gas drilling in the Chesapeake Bay
  • ensuring shoreline protections for Maryland’s Coastal Bays
  • passing nutrient pollution regulations
  • advancing Maryland’s acclaimed Smart Growth program
  • championing the Brownfields Revitalization Program
  • promoting energy conservation

Frosh chairs the Judicial Proceedings Committee and chaired the Senate’s Environmental Subcommittee from 1995 to 2003. He also serves on the multi-state Chesapeake Bay Commission, which he chaired in 2001.

Before each state election, the Maryland League of Conservation Voters (LCV) Board of Directors and staff evaluate questionnaires and conduct interviews with dozens of candidates for state-wide office, including Comptroller, Attorney General, and Governor as well candidates as for the Maryland House of Delegates and Senate.

In the 2014 elections, Maryland LCV will once again campaign to elect pro-conservation candidates. The organization will release endorsements in the coming weeks and months.
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For more than 30 years, the non-partisan Maryland League of Conservation Voters has served as the political voice of the environment. We advocate for sound conservation policies, promote environmentally responsible candidates, and hold individual elected officials accountable through our scorecards and reports.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Karla Raettig, 202-674-3174
December 20, 2013 Ed Hatcher, 301-379-2169

Trappe’s Long Time Resident John Eisenhower Dead at 91

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The Huffington Post is reporting that long time Trappe resident, John S.D. Eisenhower, the son of a five-star general turned president who forged his own career in the U.S. Army and then chronicled the history of the American military in numerous books, died Saturday. He was 91.

Read the full story here