MRC Partners with the Town of Greensboro on Tree Initiative

Midshore Riverkeeper Conservancy (MRC) and the Town of Greensboro have formed a partnership to develop and implement the Greensboro Tree Initiative. Freezing fall temperatures could not stop MRC and over 20 volunteers from planting 32 native trees on public land in the Town of Greensboro on Saturday, November 11th. Tree species included willow oak, eastern redbud, and river birch. The Town of Greensboro is located in Caroline County on the north bank of the Choptank River, and is designated by the state of Maryland as a Sustainable Community. The Town of Greensboro is committed to increasing public tree canopy in order to improve local water quality, mitigate flooding, and beautify the town while providing native habitat. For more information about the tree initiative, contact Choptank Riverkeeper Matt Pluta at matt@midshoreriverkeeper.org or 443.385.0511.

A spring planting will be held in April, coinciding with Arbor Day. To volunteer for the spring planting, please contact Suzanne@midshorriverkeeper.org.

MRC owes the Town of Greensboro Department of Public Works a huge thank you for their collaboration and site preparations, as well as project funder, Chesapeake Bay Trust.

Riverkeeper Pumpout Boat Tops Last Year’s “Pump Don’t Dump” Season

Vessel operator Jim Freeman

In spring 2016, Midshore Riverkeeper Conservancy (MRC), with funding from the Maryland Department of Natural Resources in conjunction with the Clean Vessel Act administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, purchased a 22’ Pump Kleen® pumpout boat for the Miles and Wye Rivers. For the past two years, the pumpout boat operated from May to October.In its 2016 season, the boat pumped over 8,500 gallons of waste from almost 350 boats. During the 2017 season, MRC continued its partnership with the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum (CBMM) in St. Michaels and extended the pumpout season through October, including CBMM’s OysterFest. In its 2017 season, the boat increased its statistics by almost 50%, pumping over 12,000 gallons of waste from over 400 boats.

The pumpout boat operates in partnership with CBMM, where the boat is based. CBMM donates free dockage, storage and use of their land-based pump out station to offload the waste from the pumpout boat. The sewage waste removed from boats goes directly to the recently updated St. Michaels Wastewater Treatment Plant that provides high quality treatment.

MRC’s pumpout boat is the first of its kind on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. The mobile pumpout facility significantly reduces nutrient pollution and harmful bacteria introduced by recreational boaters. The vessel allows boats to conveniently and properly dispose of waste rather than discharging it into our waterways. This service is greatly needed since there are no pumpout services on the Wye River and very few on the Miles. Because these services are limited, existing pumpout stations are often very crowded, and boaters are discouraged by long wait times or unable to reach land-based pumpout facilities.

“We are once again very proud to have had the opportunity to partner with Midshore Riverkeeper Conservancy on this now annual initiative,” says CBMM President Kristen Greenaway. “CBMM is committed to helping protect the Chesapeake Bay, both environmentally and historically, and the pumpout boat is a great tool in this respect.”

“We are thrilled with the increased results of our second season,” says MRC Executive Director and Miles-Wye Riverkeeper Jeff Horstman. “We want to thank the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum for all their help and support. The pumpout boat has a direct and measurable impact on clean water, which contributes to our mission to protect and restore our rivers. Additionally, this fun little boat, expertly operated by Jim Freeman, has been one of our best public outreach tools, educating people who use the river the most on how much our rivers need help.”

For more information, please contact Jeff Horstman at 443.385.0511 or jeff@midshoreriverkeeper.org.

Midshore Riverkeepers Host Creation Care Workshop November 30

St. Luke’s congregation in Cambridge planting native trees in St. Luke’s second environmental stewardship project.

Midshore Riverkeeper Conservancy (MRC), in partnership with Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake, will host a one-hour “Creation Care” workshop to bring together the faith community and the environmental community. The workshop, which is part of MRC’s Stewards for Streams Faith Initiative, will be held on Thursday, November 30 from 5:30-6:30pm at the Eastern Shore Conservation Center, located at 114 S. Washington Street in Easton.

Faith organizations and dedicated individuals of any denomination are encouraged to attend. Through this workshop, MRC will offer three free ways that the faith community can engage their congregations in environmental stewardship and education. MRC and Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake have already collaborated with 10 churches to install rain gardens and native trees that beautify the church grounds while reducing pollution and benefiting the local environment. MRC and Interfaith Partners can provide a menu of options that go beyond in-the-ground projects, including youth trips and service learning, adult education programs, and advocacy.

“Faith organizations are pillars in our community that can stand as examples of environmental stewardship,” says Suzanne Sullivan, MRC’s Stewards for Streams coordinator. “They have an audience of dedicated individuals and families who can help spread environmental messages and actions.”

Participating congregations include: Grace Lutheran, Presbyterian Church, and St. Mark’s in Easton, and St. Luke United Methodist and Waugh Chapel in Cambridge, as well as Greater New Hope Baptist in Preston. To RSVP for this event, email Suzanne@midshoreriverkeeper.org or call 443-385-0511.

Midshore Riverkeeper Conservancy Offers glassybaby Candles for Holiday Giving

Midshore Riverkeeper Conservancy (MRC), along with Waterkeepers Chesapeake, has formed a partnership that brings the West and East Coasts together in support of a cleaner Chesapeake Bay. In glassybaby hot shops in Seattle and Berkeley, more than 80 glassblowers handcraft molten glass into unique and functional votive candles and drinking glasses in a dazzling array of colors. In addition to creating beautiful products, glassybaby reports that it “actively supports causes that help people, animals and our planet heal.” To date, glassybaby has given over $7 million to a wide variety of nonprofit organizations.

A gaggle of shimmering Chesapeake glassybaby votive candles.

MRC is one of 19 Riverkeeper organizations that make up Waterkeepers Chesapeake, a coalition of independent programs working to make the waters of the Chesapeake and Coastal Bays swimmable and fishable. MRC is part of this alliance that monitors and cares for all the rivers that flow to the Chesapeake Bay, a watershed that covers six states.

Waterkeepers Chesapeake and glassybaby have joined forces to launch a beautiful new votive candle called Chesapeake, glassybaby’s first product for the Chesapeake Bay region. The Chesapeake votive captures the colors and clarity that are the essence of the Bay. Under glassybaby’s power of giving program, 10% of the price of each Chesapeake glassybaby will be donated to Waterkeepers Chesapeake to help support their work from New York to Virginia.

The glassybaby candles will be available at Easton’s famous Waterfowl Festival, which takes place November 10-12, 2017. NOTE: Waterkeepers Chesapeake will receive 10% of ALL SALES (not just Chesapeake) made during Waterfowl Festival (November 10-12) and up to 2 weeks afterwards. Use the code “waterfowl” when ordering.

Or purchase your very own Chesapeake glassybaby online at midshoreriverkeeper.org/glassybaby. For more information, contact Kristan Droter at kdroter@midshoreriverkeeper.org or 443.385.0511.

Midshore Riverkeepers Moves to Eastern Shore Conservation Center

Pictured in this under-construction photo, are MRC staff members (left to right) Jake LeGates, Kristin Junkin, Jeff Horstman, Tim Junkin, Suzanne Sullivan, Matt Pluta, Elle O’Brien, Ann Frock, and Timothy Rosen.

Midshore Riverkeeper Conservancy (MRC) is pleased to announce that it has moved into the Eastern Shore Conservation Center complex. MRC’s new address is 114 South Washington Street, Suite 301, Easton, Maryland, 21601.

During the past five months, the Steam Plant Building, which sits as a separate brick building just adjacent to the main structure on the Conservation Center’s campus, has undergone major renovations, including the construction of a mezzanine second floor and the addition of numerous glass windows. The renovated historic structure has retained its interior brick walls and high ceilings, but now provides 14 individual working spaces, along with an entrance lobby and storage facilities.

MRC’s director of operations, Kristin Junkin, managed the tenant improvements and build-out. “It is charming, historic space,” she says, “reminiscent of a New York warehouse art studio. And we are all delighted to be a part of the new Eastern Shore Conservation Center.”

MRC moved into the structure on September 28, and extends an invitation to all its members and friends to stop by and enjoy a tour.

For more information about MRC is available at midshoreriverkeeper.org or by calling 443.385.0511.

Midshore Riverkeepers Receive Major Grant for Agricultural Conservation

Midshore Riverkeeper Conservancy (MRC) was recently awarded a grant of $451,960 from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) Chesapeake Bay Stewardship Fund to create a regional program that advances the implementation of conservation drainage practices and tests new agricultural best management practice technologies that have great potential to reduce nutrient and sediment from entering the Chesapeake Bay.

Many local farms were initially drained using a system of drain tiles. Unfortunately, over the decades these structures have deteriorated. MRC will work with agricultural landowners to retrofit old and failing drain tile lines with the latest conservation practices and create a drainage water management plan to maximize the benefits of the new conservation drainage system. These innovations will reduce sediment, nitrogen, and phosphorus losses from agricultural land that has drain tile lines. A goal of this program is to accelerate the implementation of the outlet and infield best management practices by incentivizing farmers through offering the replacement of antiquated existing drain tile and surface inlets.

MRC Staff Scientist Tim Rosen installs an updated conservation drainage system at an agricultural site.

This work will create a framework for a conservation drainage program that can be used to justify the funding of a state-run program administered by the Maryland Department of Agriculture. In addition, the program will provide a blueprint for other Bay states to adopt their version of a conservation drainage program. This program will help bring Maryland to the forefront in addressing agricultural drainage pollution and help position our farm community to be more economically and environmentally sustainable. MRC’s program will focus on four watersheds—the Choptank, Nanticoke, Pocomoke/Tangier, and Chester—that span eight Maryland counties.

Completion of this grant will result in the installation of eight separate projects that incorporate either a denitrifying bioreactor, saturated buffer, or structure for water control and blind inlets. It is anticipated that 2 denitrifying bioreactors, 2 saturated buffers, and 4 structures for water control will be installed with an estimated 14 blind inlets. In total, this will reduce a total of 3,456 pounds of nitrate-nitrogen per year, 49 pounds of phosphorus per year, and 46,666 pounds of sediment per year.

MRC has obtained commitments from private and state sources to provide a match of $467,980, enabling the organization to devote a total of $919,940 to this important work.

For more information contact MRC Staff Scientist Tim Rosen at 443.385.0511 or trosen@midshoreriverkeeper.org.

Ride for Clean Rivers Tops $60,000

On Sunday, September 18, Midshore Riverkeeper Conservancy (MRC) hosted hundreds of cyclists from across the region who converged at Chesapeake College to experience firsthand the Midshore’s natural beauty during the 13th Annual Ride for Clean Rivers.

Close to 400 riders took to the backroads of Maryland’s Eastern Shore, exploring rural countryside, and visiting Tuckahoe State Park, the small town of Queen Anne, and Kingston Landing. It was a day filled with fun, friends, and fitness. MRC would like to thank everyone who cycled, volunteered, sponsored, and cheered throughout the day. With such strong support, MRC raised well over $60,000 toward protecting and restoring Midshore rivers.

MRC staff (L-R) Matt Pluta, Meta Boyd, Rebecca Murphy, Suzanne Sullivan, Elle O’Brien, Jeff Horstman, Ann Frock, and Kristin Junkin.

Thank you to Dock Street Foundation, KELLY Benefit Strategies, Chesapeake College, Agency of Record, Bay Imprint, Bay Pediatric Center, Bike Doctor, Bicycling magazine, Blessings Environmental Concepts, The Brewer’s Art, C-Jam Yacht Sales, Diamondback Bikes, Dr. Computer, S.E.W Friel, The Orthopedic Center, Solar Energy Services, and Sweetwater Brewing for sponsoring this year’s ride. Thank you to rest stop sponsors—Adkins Arboretum, 4-H Chesapeake Bay Club, and Sprout—and the SAG (support and gear) crew that helped keep riders safe and energized. Bike racks were provided by Cambridge Multi-Sport, food was catered by BBQ Joint and Chesapeake College, and the band was Edgemere. And finally, thank you for the support of all riders and rider sponsors. Congratulations to the top fundraisers, Bob Eisinger, Hutch Smith, Debi McKibben, and Tom Fauquier. McKibben was the winner of a Century 2 bike, generously donated by Diamondback.

All proceeds from Ride for Clean Rivers support MRC’s education, restoration, and water quality monitoring programs.

Midshore Riverkeeper Conservancy is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the restoration, protection, and celebration of the waterways that comprise the Choptank River, Eastern Bay, Miles River, and Wye River watersheds. For more information, visit midshoreriverkeeper.org, email kdroter@midshoreriverkeeper.org, or phone 443.385.0511.

Kristan Droter Joins Riverkeepers as Development & Event Coordinator

Midshore Riverkeeper Conservancy (MRC) is pleased to announce that Kristan Droter has been hired as Development and Event Coordinator. Droter has a strong background in management, finance, sales and marketing. She graduated from the University of North Carolina with a B.A. in Psychology. Her career, including positions at Smith Barney and Kaplan Test Prep, has taken her to Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Washington, DC, and New Orleans. She has worked with thousands of professionals, students, teachers and doctors from around the world. She led the reopening of Kaplan Test Prep’s New Orleans and Baton Rouge offices after Hurricane Katrina, piecing those centers back together, hiring and training new staff, and directly assisting displaced employees and students.

MRC Executive Director Jeff Horstman says, “We are thrilled to have Kristan onboard as our new development and event coordinator. With her professional background and local roots, I know she will be an asset to our work and our mission.”

Droter says she is thrilled to return to her birthplace on Maryland’s beautiful Eastern Shore, where she lives with her husband, Steve, their three young sons, and their trusty dog Uli. Contact her at kdroter@midshoreriverkeeper.org or 443.385.0511.

Midshore Riverkeeper Conservancy is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the restoration, protection, and celebration of the Choptank River, Eastern Bay, Miles River, and Wye River watersheds. For more information, visit midshoreriverkeeper.org.

MRC Installs Rain Garden at St. Mark’s UMC

Through a partnership with Midshore Riverkeeper Conservancy (MRC), St. Mark’s United Methodist Church in Easton has an attractive new addition to their property. On July 20, volunteers from St. Marks, MRC, and special guests from the YMCA summer camp planted a 240-square-foot rain garden. Workers of all ages planted more than 200 native plants, including over 22 different species, such as red twig dogwood, joe-pye weed, and blueberry bushes.

A rain garden is an attractive and functional technique to reduce stormwater pollution by collecting and absorbing runoff from impervious surfaces such as parking lots, driveways, and roofs. Before the rain garden was installed, a roof gutter from the church building led directly to the storm drain. Since installation of the rain garden, stormwater will be diverted to the rain garden. In addition to improving water quality, this native rain garden will serve as a habitat for birds, butterflies, and other native wildlife.

Runoff from the downspout shown here will now be diverted into the new rain garden.

The St. Mark’s project was funded by Chesapeake Bay Trust. Other project partners included Adkins Arboretum, Kurt Bluemel, Inc, Environmental Concern, Herring Nursery, and Severn Grove Ecological Design. Representatives from St. Mark’s included Frank Meyerle, Bill Gunther and Pat Lewers.

This project is the second rain garden planted in MRC’s Stewards for Streams program,which connects faith-based organizations and environmental stewardship. The program offers congregations a range of engaging and meaningful teachings and activities, from restoration projects and congregation kayak trips, to rain barrel installation and adult/youth environmental education opportunities.

Midshore Riverkeeper Conservancy is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the restoration, protection, and celebration of the waterways that comprise the Choptank River, Eastern Bay, Miles River, and Wye River watersheds. For those interested in getting involved in projects with MRC, future rain garden plantings are scheduled with Grace Lutheran in Easton and Greater New Hope Ministries in Preston. For more information or to volunteer, please contact Suzanne Sullivan at suzanne@midshoreriverkeeper.org

Midshore Riverkeeper Conservancy’s Ride for Clean Rivers

On Sunday, September 17, Midshore Riverkeeper Conservancy (MRC) will hold the 13th Annual Ride for Clean Rivers at Chesapeake College in Wye Mills, Maryland. MRC is excited to partner with Chesapeake College for the third year in a row to bring this cycling event to the Midshore region. Chesapeake College aligns with MRC’s mission by being proactive in campus environmental initiatives, including wind and solar power, native grass plantings, car charging stations, and stormwater projects being implemented in partnership with MRC.

Team MRC (L-R) Tim Rosen, Matt Pluta, Elle O’Brien, Suzanne Sullivan, Jeff Horstman, Ann Frock, Elizabeth Brown, Beth Horstman, Dana Diefenbach, Keitasha Royal, Kristin Junkin, Tim Junkin, and Sarah Boynton. Photo © Tony J Photography

Riders can enjoy Maryland’s scenic Eastern Shore along three routes—62 miles (metric century), 35 miles, and 20 miles. Routes follow the flat, picturesque backroads of Queen Anne’s, Caroline, and Talbot Counties, with rest stops exploring Tuckahoe State Park, Tuckahoe Creek, and the banks of the Choptank River. All routes start and finish at Chesapeake College, and have rest stops and SAG (support and gear) support. There will be morning snacks and coffee at the registration tables, and an outdoor barbeque and live music when riders return to campus. Registration includes food, drinks, barbeque, and event tee-shirt.

Last year, over 400 registered riders of all abilities helped to raise over $55,000. Come out and help reach this year’s goal of 500+ riders. This is a great opportunity to create a bike team with friends, family, bike clubs, or officemates.

Discounted early bird registration ends July 31. Riders may register, raise funds, procure rider sponsors, and win prizes at the event website, rideforcleanrivers.org.

Ride for Clean Rivers supports the work of MRC to protect and restore the Miles, Wye, and Choptank Rivers and Eastern Bay. For more information, visit midshoreriverkeeper.org or contact Sarah at sarah@midshoreriverkeeper.org or 443.385.0511.

Thank you to our 2017 sponsors Agency of Record, Bicycling magazine, The Brewer’s Art, Chesapeake College, C-Jam Yacht Sales, Dock Street Foundation, S.E.W. Friel, KELLY Benefit Strategies, Sprout, and Solar Energy Services.

For more information about becoming a sponsor or supporter of Ride for Clean Rivers, contact Sarah at sarah@midshoreriverkeeper.org or call 443.385.0511.