Easton Sidewalks: A Donut Chaser on North Street

While much could be said about the special beauty of a late 1920s Packard Motors Eight, one of which was spotted by the Spy on North Street the other day, nothing can compete with its exquisite hood ornament that signals a stately arrival on any road in America.

Sadly, Packard’s “Goddess of Speed,” which is heavily sought after as a rare collectible, even without the car, is now referred to in the trade as the “donut chaser.” Hardly the kind of respectful name worthy of such a striking and dramatic emblem.

 

Wanted: Landowners on the Upper Shore to Help Reverse Northern Bobwhite Declines by Dan Small

The Natural Lands Project is looking for landowners interested in setting aside marginal cropland to help declining Northern Bobwhites. Since 2015 we have been working throughout Kent and Queen Anne’s Counties, in addition to these current efforts we would also like to target two areas that currently have small quail populations. These two areas, one each in Kent and Queen Anne’s, have some existing habitat, but we could have a major positive impact on the quail population by installing additional acres of nesting and brood rearing habitat. In Queen Anne’s we are looking to work with landowners along Lands End Road from Southeast Creek south to the Corsica River and in Kent, farms between Betterton and Still Pond (see accompanying maps).

Male Indigo Bunting in a wildflower meadow planted in 2016 by NLP.

People growing up on the Eastern Shore in the 60’s and ‘70s remember well the loud expressive whistle ‘BOB-white’ emanating from around the farm in late spring and lasting throughout the hot summer months. In the cooler months, bird dogs searched for the scent of nearby quail coveys through wooded edges, scrubby briar tangles, hedgerows and bean fields across property boundaries followed closely by their owners. This characteristic bird, the Northern Bobwhite, of Maryland’s agricultural landscape has disappeared from all but a few isolated areas throughout the Shore. Along with the decline in quail populations, we hear fewer grassland birds and see fewer pollinating insects and wildflowers.

There are myriad theories for the drastic decline in grassland biodiversity in such a short period of time and most, if not all, have a grain of truth to them. However, without a doubt the single largest driver of bobwhite decline on the Eastern Shore is habitat loss. Several factors have contributed to habitat loss; there are simply more people living on the shore and as a result we have more developed areas. Additionally, our farms have changed. The acceleration of farming technologies after World War II brought with it larger equipment and increased use of herbicides and pesticides, tools that allowed farmers to till more ground more of the time. This, in turn, led to larger and larger farms and fewer and fewer small fields. Suddenly the ‘back forty’ that was periodically fallow and permanently surrounded by a hedgerow was no longer. Today much of landscape on the Shore is defined by crops, forests, waterways and buffers of exotic cool season grasses—similar to lawns—with little in between.

Map showing target area in Queen Anne’s County, an area where additional habitat would substantially help Northern Bobwhite populations.

But all is not lost. In 2015 Washington College’s Center for Environment & Society (CES) partnered with the Chester River Association (CRA) and Tall Timber Research Station, the nation’s leader in bobwhite research and management of fire-dependent ecosystems, to launch the Natural Lands Project (NLP) with a $700,000 award from the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. Using the remarkable habitat restoration success at CES’s research station on Chino Farms in Queen Anne’s County and CRA’s success at promoting best management practices on local area farms, NLP set out with the goal of creating a balance between cropland and wildlife habitat to improve water quality. NLP promotes and installs native warm season grasses as best management practices that will help reverse bobwhite population declines and reduce excess sedimentation and nutrient runoff in our waterways.

Map showing target area in Kent County, an area of small farms and hedgerows – the addition of nesting habitat would help Northern Bobwhites.

In addition to buffers and fields for bobwhite NLP also installs wetlands in poorly drained areas of marginal farm fields. Wetlands are phenomenal at reducing nutrients and preventing sediment from entering the Bay’s tributaries, with the added benefit of proving critical habitat for over-wintering waterfowl. Following up on the successful launch of NLP in 2015, CES was just recently awarded another round of funding from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation to continue adding habitat for grassland biodiversity and to help improve the Bay’ water quality – see http://chestertownspy.org/2017/09/24/500k-grant-to-center-for-environment-and-society/

It is important to note that productive farming, vibrant wildlife, and healthy water are not mutually exclusive. By taking marginal cropland out of production and planting a mix of native warm season grasses and wildflowers we are creating areas for bobwhite, other grassland birds, and pollinators to find much needed food, shelter, and breeding sites.

Male Northern Bobwhite on Chino Farms.

On Chino Farms there is a thriving native bobwhite population, in fact, now the largest in Maryland. This is a result of well-managed grasslands and early successional habitat that weave throughout a for-profit conventional agricultural operation. Since 1999 when marginal areas of row crops were converted to native habitat, these grasslands have reduced an estimated 80 lbs phosphorus, 1200 lbs nitrogen and 40,500 lbs of sediment from entering our local waterways annually. Our experience and results on Chino make us confident that habitat is the key missing ingredient for quail to once again to thrive on the Shore. As an Eastern Shore community we now need to work on landscape-level change, installing and managing grasslands and wetlands alongside of our farming priorities.

If you would like to find out more about the project, arrange a farm visit or see/hear quail on Chino Farms contact Dan Small, dsmall2@washcoll.edu or 410-708-4479 or visit www.washcoll.edu/nlp. We are looking forward to working with many more of the Eastern Shore’s best land stewards as NLP grows.

 

Food Friday: End of the Summer

Fall is here, although it doesn’t feel like it. Hurricanes are churning their ways up the coast from Florida. It is still sub-tropically warm and damp. And yet I am anticipating cooler weather and warmer foods. I know, come February, I will be pining away for summertime treats. Sometimes I feel like Milo in The Phantom Tollbooth, always longing for the next experience. I should be like the cat, happily napping in pools of warm buttery sunlight, but in truth I just flipped through the L.L. Bean winter outdoor clothing catalogue with relish!

Cooler weather means I will return to the kitchen and will rummage about for the big stew pots, the loaf pans, the Crock Pot and the recipes that will stick-to-our-ribs. And, I fear, enlarging our expanding waistlines… Stews, chilies, spaghetti sauces, meatloaves, lasagnes, breads, brownies and pot pies. Spices swirling in the air. Baking. Anticipating Thanksgiving. I’m dreaming of a change from the hot, all-too-familiar sameness of this stinking hot old summer. And then there are the sugar plums that arrive in December! Plus having to figure out what to do for the Christmas card this year!

I love trailing through food halls, peering through shop windows and admiring perfectly arranged still lives of fruits, vegetables and meats, getting ideas and inspirations. In London at Selfridge’s palatial food hall a couple of years ago I marveled at the goose eggs, duck eggs and quail eggs artfully displayed in small packages in a case that also included tubs of duck fat. Interesting. Perplexing. Nearby there were the picture perfect piles of roasted meats and strings of sausages, and acres of fish and pretty shiny red lobsters, too. Much easier culinary concepts for my addled tourist brain to absorb.

Closer to home we have a butcher shop where all manner of imported specialities are stacked on every surface, and they are fascinating to contemplate while standing in line for my two pounds of Italian sausage; one hot, one sweet. Perched on counters and shelves and under the counter are day-glow pink pickled eggs in Jeroboam-sized jars, capers galore, an abundance of olive varieties, huge cafeteria-sized tins of La Bella San Marzano Italian Plum Tomatoes, gallons of imported light, plain, virgin and extra virgin olive oils in varying-shaped bottles and vessels, dusty packages of pastas, trays of fresh mozzarella, and I could continue the inventory all day. I always feel humbled when confronted by all the ingredients of what must be the potential for many feasts, when all I want is some sausage.

We do not ease our way back inside from the summer spent cooking on the grill. It is done abruptly. Labor Day has come and gone. The white shoes have been banished (except for sneakers). Football games occupy the weekends. I’d prefer to have my sausage and chicken cooked on the grill, but the grill is in semi-retirement. It will only cook steaks and hamburgers until the spring rolls around again, or if our Connecticut friend comes to visit and we prepare Big Love Pizza as a threesome. It is back to the kitchen for me – the summer holiday is over.

The End of Summer
Chicken, Sausage and Peppers

• 1/4 cup olive oil
• 2 large bell peppers, cut into strips (We like the sweeter tasting red or yellow peppers)
• 2 medium onions, sliced (I like Vidalia or any sweet onion)
• 3 garlic cloves, minced
• 1 pound hot Italian sausage
• 1 pound sweet Italian sausage
• 1 pound boneless chicken breast, cubed
• A generous sprinkle of crushed red pepper flakes

Heat oil in heavy large skillet over medium heat. Add peppers, onions, garlic and sauté 10 minutes. Cook until tender, about 5 -10 minutes. I like to singe the edges of the vegetables.

Cook sausages in another heavy large skillet over medium-high heat until brown and cooked through, turning occasionally, about 15 minutes. Ditto with the chicken cubes. Scoop the peppers and onions onto a platter and pile the meat on top. Add a salad, a crusty loaf of bread, a tall glass of wine and candles.

This is a good meal to make on the weekend, because you can toss the leftover sausage and chicken with pasta or rice, and voilà! Dinner is made for a dreary Monday, when no one (least of all me!) wants to cook.
Summer is almost a dream again.

http://food52.com/recipes/15846-healthy-sausage-peppers

http://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/open-face-sausage-and-peppers-sandwiches

“What good is the warmth of summer, without the cold of winter to give it sweetness.”
― John Steinbeck

Grand Opening of Kent County Arts Council’s New Gallery Space

Join us on Friday, November 3rd – during Downtown Chestertown First Friday – for the opening of the inaugural exhibition in the new gallery of the Kent County Arts Council (KCAC). We are christening our new space with artwork from The Arts & The Military ART/ifacts Collection and from The Joe Bonham Project. Our inaugural show – War Front / Home Front: Through the Eyes of Our Military – is created in partnership with curator Tara Tappert, Founder and Principal of The Arts & The Military and Michael D. Fay, Founder of The Joe Bonham Project. It is funded, in part, by The Institute for Integrative Health.

The ART/ifacts Collection is the tangible legacy of art-making as activism, and the nature of the work allows for the exploration of military culture, and the history of war, and its costs. Themes include patriotism, nationalism, and perceptions of duty, suffering, heroism, and loyalty. Several grassroots veteran-art groups are represented in the Collection – Button Field Paper, Combat Paper Project, Peace Paper Project, Veterans in the Arts, as well as the work of individual veteran-artists. The Joe Bonham Project is named after the fictional, limbless, faceless protagonist of the 1939 anti-war novel, Johnny Got His Gun, by Dalton Trumbo. The project’s purpose is to show the real face of war and the aftermath of war with artwork that portrays the realities and human consequences of combat. The project distances itself from politics, preferring instead to be seen as apolitical “witness art.”

There will be three special events during the run of the show. All are free and everyone is welcome.
1) Grand Opening – First Friday, November 3rd, 5:00 to 7:30 p.m.
2) Poetry Reading – Medic Against Bomb: A Doctor’s Poetry of War, Frederick Foote, M.D. (CAPT, MC, USN, ret.) – Sunday, November 12, 2:00 p.m.
3) Illustrated Lecture – Beyond Stereotypes: War, Warriors, and the Creative Arts, by Tara Tappert, Founder and Principal, The Arts & The Military; and, Michael D. Fay, (CW02, USMC, ret.) Retired Combat Artist, and Founder, The Joe Bonham Project, Sunday, November 19, 2:00 p.m.

Military Working Dog (for Dave Nevis)
by Patrick Sargent (United States Air Force), silkscreen on paper made from pulped military uniforms, 2015

Wed – Fri: Noon – 6 p.m.
Saturday: 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Sunday: 11 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Kent County Arts Council, 101 Spring Avenue / PO Box 330 Chestertown, MD 21620

From South of Left Field: Political Drugs by Jimmie Galbreath

History is the unsung foundation to understanding politics. Not the history of names, dates and short little paragraphs taught in our schools today but history as the story; richer, deeper and alive. The connections between what is and what was are direct and real. It is the things we know little about that make it easy for us to be frightened and manipulated. It is real knowledge that gives us the courage to choose our own opinions rather than accept the opinions of others. Only babies should be spoon fed.

Poking around my mental closet of ‘common knowledge’ learned from childhood, another gem that changed over the years relates to governments in general. America was the gold standard Democracy and Russia and China the failing evil dictatorships because that is what a Communist government is. The Democracy I was taught was childish in its simplicity, and it remained that way for quite a number of years. Vietnam, Watergate and time opened the door to new research. What had my teachers failed to tell me?

Today Democracy means any government structure made up of elected representatives. Ooooh, impressive sounding, isn’t it. Then it got a little complicated. The Russian (Soviet and today) and Chinese governments have elected officials. Do we amend Democracy and say it must have more than one political party?

From there I began to read books on Soviet and Chinese modern history and moved on to ‘The Communist Manifesto.’ Much to my surprise both communism and socialism were not models of government but economic systems. The thrust behind these systems was to remove the wealth inequality that exists in a capitalistic economy. The philosopher Karl Marx proposed that the evolution of economic systems from slavery to feudalism to capitalism would continue on to communism. Communism as the next evolutionary step would remove private ownership of factories, mines, farms, etc. and all the people would own everything in common. The adjustment here was mind-bending. I have chased my tail around and around trying to comprehend how that economic system would work to produce the complex items we have today which requires resources from around the globe. I guess I am not evolved enough yet.

Looking for a government structure in this system I kept running into either ‘direct Democracy’ or ‘representative Democracy.’ You read that right; the ideal new economy still requires people to work together to reach decisions which still needs votes which is still Democracy. Imagine that.

‘Direct Democracy’ would be citizens voting directly for a law rather than having elected representatives such as our Congress to do it. That would be cumbersome. ‘Representative Democracy’ is what we already have! There is no dictatorship in communism or socialism if it is implemented exactly as the founders laid it out. Russia and China aren’t really communist because both have a capitalist economic system. Now folks, from here it is time to circle back to where we are today. The system laid down by Marx, Engels, and Lenin, while ideally eliminating income inequality requires that we all become selfless and totally trusting and sharing with each other for this to work. A level of social evolution that is clearly absent in our current leadership and largely lacking in our current society.

This may sound bleak, and I don’t mean for it to be. The range of forms of Democracy are amazingly broad. Our flavor of Democracy has changed since first established by the Constitution. Originally the States decided who could vote, and they generally allowed only white adult property-owning males to do so. Only members of the House of Representatives were elected directly. Senators were selected by the State House of Representatives for each state. The President was selected by an Electoral College. It was a pretty narrow Democracy compared to what we have today.

The thing about a Democracy is you can have a wide variety of voting rights and freedom, or very limited voting rights and few freedoms while still meeting the definition. It is not enough to say a country is a Democracy; rather one should say WHAT KIND of Democracy a country has.

Iran has all the organizations of a Democracy with elections. There is a Supreme Leader (Executive), Legislative (Parliament), Judiciary and an Assembly of Experts (legal and religious). The last organization has to approve anyone wanting to run for office. This version of Democracy is a Theocracy, and the State religion exerts tremendous power over the people and government. Our religious fundamentalists seek to move us down this path with rule by their religion rather than a political party. Hearing repeatedly statements that America is a Christian nation sends shivers down my spine as the Founders clearly had no such criteria in mind.

China has the Executive branch (President and State Council), Legislative (National People’s Congress), Judicial (Supreme People’s Court) but only one political Party is allowed. Once again control by a single entity with a restricted set of voters while still having the trappings of Democracy. It is ironic that the Party claims to be a communist Party despite the fact that capitalism is rampant there. There are no real communist or socialist economies as there are no countries without capitalism. Don’t believe me? Find a country without a corporation or a businessman. Good luck.

Today we have a democracy in America that follows the desires of wealthy families and corporations more than the will of the people. I am amused and repulsed listening to Republican politicians trying to sound humane while touting a medical industry solution to healthcare. Insisting that all Americans can afford decent healthcare from a corporation is an epic smoke and mirror act. Universal corporate healthcare is only universal for those who can afford it. This stance, profit over a healthy life, supports the idea that American Democracy is moving toward being an Oligarchy: a Democracy driven by a wealthy few placing the well-being of corporate wallets over the well-being of the general population.

There is no danger of communism or socialism overtaking America with anything other than a large scale revolution. Casting a national effort to secure a healthy life for all citizens as socialism is a baseless effort to paint a humane policy as something to be afraid of. Universal healthcare ends capitalism in the hospital where it should never have been allowed in the first place. It does not end capitalism overall. If caring for human life and quality of life is socialism then what does that say about capitalism’s goals in the hospital? Hint, the only thing a capitalist wants is money.

Jimmie Galbreath is a retired Engineer originally from a small family-owned dairy farm in Jefferson County, MS. He earned a B.S in Petroleum Engineering from MS State University, accumulating 20 years Nuclear experience at Grand Gulf Nuclear Power Station and Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Station. Along the way, he worked as a roustabout on an oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico, served three years active service as a Quartermaster Officer in the US Army, Supervised brick kilns first in MS than in Atlanta GA and whatever else it took to skin the cat. He now lives on the Eastern Shore of Maryland.

$500K Grant to Center for Environment and Society

A male bobwhite quail at the Natural Lands Project

The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation has awarded Washington College’s Center for Environment & Society (CES) $500,000 to expand its innovative Natural Lands Project into the mid-shore. The foundation grant meets $801,000 in matching funding from CES and its partners, Midshore Riverkeeper Conservancy, Ducks Unlimited, and Pickering Creek Audubon Center, for a total of $1.3 million for the project.

The Natural Lands Project (NLP), piloted at the college’s Chester River Field Research Station at Chino Farms, enlists the support of local landowners to restore grassland habitat for bobwhite quail and other species while also creating buffers that help filter runoff into the Chesapeake Bay’s tributaries.

“The Natural Lands Project encompasses the best of what we do and teach—it restores habitat, cleans the Bay, and perhaps most important, it provides an example to our students of how the cultural links between environment and society can be used in restoration,” said John Seidel, director of the CES. “That social and community element in restoration is critical to the future of the Chesapeake, as well as to watersheds around the world.”

The grant, announced Sept. 19, was among 44 projects awarded through the Chesapeake Bay Stewardship Fund, a partnership between the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) and the Environmental Protection Agency’s Nutrient and Sediment Reduction Grants and Small Watershed Grants programs, as well as other partners. Washington College is the only institution of higher education among the recipients.

“Through the Chesapeake Bay Stewardship Fund, the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation and our partners, especially the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, continue to invest in locally led efforts to protect and restore the more than 100,000 miles of local rivers and streams that feed the Bay,” said Jeff Trandahl, executive director and CEO, NFWF. “These investments demonstrate that the actions necessary to restore local rivers and streams go hand in hand with opportunities to enhance local communities.”

One of the biggest issues for the Bay on the Eastern Shore is agricultural runoff. Collaterally, as more acreage is put into agriculture, grassland and upland habitats are vanishing, and with them, iconic species like the bobwhite quail. Using the restored grasslands at the college’s Chester River Field Research Station, Dan Small, a field ecologist with CES and now coordinator of the NLP, has been conducting surveys to document the quail population in the restored grasslands and around the farm. By last year, Small and Washington College student researchers documented an average of 25 calling males and an estimated 29 coveys—the highest concentration of the species in the state of Maryland since its precipitous decline began decades ago.

As a game bird, the bobwhite historically is on a cultural par with the Canada goose on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. Its loss was keenly felt among hunters, sportsmen, and farmers. In an effort to motivate landowners to create more habitat for the quail—and, by extension, create buffers that would help reduce agricultural runoff into the Bay’s tributaries—the CES worked with the Chester River Association in 2015 to spin the quail restoration into the Natural Lands Project with a $700,000 award from the Department of Natural Resources.

“The concept was simple,” said Mike Hardesty, associate director of programs and staff at CES. “Transform less-than-productive agricultural land into natural habitat for iconic species. Give landowners a cultural reason—even more compelling than a financial one—to set aside some of their land for habitat management, which in turn would benefit local water quality and Bay restoration efforts.” The NLP also restores wetlands in order to achieve similar water quality and wildlife benefits.

In the first two years, the NLP created 274 acres of native upland grasses and wildflowers in marginal cropland on 11 participating farms. Ten wetlands projects—25 acres of wetlands in fields with unproductive soils poorly suited for growing crops—were also completed. College students and CES researchers began what will be a continuing survey of bird populations to monitor abundance and diversity at each site.

The new funding will be used to expand the project to into the middle and upper Eastern Shore to 285 more acres of buffers and 16 more acres of wetlands. Before receiving the award, five landowners signed on for an additional 115 acres. CES expects this project and its focus to grow and the model to be used in watersheds across the country.

Watch a video about the Natural Lands Project.

 

Cheers for Aliah: Denton Girl Now Ranked 6th in Country in Gymnastics Tumbling

USA Gymnastics has announced the U.S. Trampoline and Tumbling Team for the 2017 World Age Group Competition, Nov. 13-20, in Sofia, Bulgaria. The World Age Group Competition will determine champions in trampoline, double mini-trampoline and tumbling for boys and girls in age-groups 11-12, 13-14, 15-16 and 17-21.  

Twelve year old Aliah Raga of Denton, a gymnast at Chesapeake Gymnastics in Easton, has been named as a U.S. Trampoline and Tumbling Team member in the competition’s double mini-trampoline event.  The U.S. Team for the World Age Group Competition was named by the Selection Committee based on scores from USA Gymnastic National Championships as well as bonus points earned at Winter Classic, Elite Challenge and USA Gymnastic National Championships.

Raga has trained in gymnastics since she was five.  “After climbing baby gates in her infancy and the tallest slides when she was a toddler, I realized that a recreational class at Easton’s Chesapeake Gymnastics was what she needed,” proclaimed Adrienne Raga, Aliah’s mother.  After only a few months, Raga advanced to Chesapeake’s artistic gymnastics team, which claimed multiple first place team trophies her first year, and where Aliah received a gold medal on balance beam at the State competition.  By the time Raga was eight, Coach Joan Dyott moved her to the Chesapeake Gymnastics’ Trampoline and Tumbling program. “With her power and determination, she was destined to succeed there,” noted Dyott.

Although Raga was ranked 6th in the nation for power tumbling level 9 in the 11-12 year old age group at the 2016 USAG Trampoline and Tumbling Championships, she was unable to compete in that event during 2017, due to an injury. Aliah was, however, able to compete at the 2017 Fairland T&T Invitational in both trampoline, where her five double somersaults earned her a bronze medal, and in double mini-trampoline, where two double somersaults earned her the gold.  She was mobilized to youth elite status in both of these events, and went on to compete at the 2017 USAG T&T Nationals, taking third place in double mini-trampoline as a youth elite.  

When asked how she felt about representing the United States in an international meet, Raga stated, “Whatever happens will happen, I am just happy that I will be there.”  

Champions Booster Club, a 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to supporting and encouraging Chesapeake Gymnastics team members to reach such heights, is accepting donations to assist with the expenses involved in travel to Sofia, Bulgaria for the World Age Group Competition.  If you would like make a donation, please send checks to Champions Booster Club, c/o Chesapeake Gymnastics, 8610 Commerce Drive, Easton, MD 21601.  For further information, contact Deborah Davis at (443) 239-1194.

 

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Food Friday: Zucchini Fest

Have you started sneaking zucchini onto your neighbors’ front porches under the cover of night yet? If you have a garden, you have been harvesting tomatoes with an greedy heart, thinking about jars of spaghetti sauce you will enjoy this winter. But what about that ever-expanding green mountain of zucchini? If your neighbors are hiding behind their lace curtains when you come tippy-toeing up their front walks, then you need to put on your thinking cap, and find some creative culinary solutions. Zucchini fest!

Nobody is fooled by zucchini bread. Least of all small children into whom you are trying to stuff healthy vegetables. You might fool them once, but never twice. Here is one recipe for you to try, you shameless exploiter of small children. Lemon Zucchini Bread: http://www.lemontreedwelling.com/2017/03/lemon-zucchini-bread.html

One of the best ways to reduce your zucchini surplus is to invite unsuspecting houseguests. Breakfast is usually a good time for a surprise zucchini onslaught. The white wine from last night isn’t out of their systems yet, and the coffee hasn’t kicked in. They will need food. A hot and cheesy frittata, please. If they were raised to have minimally good manners, they will eat whatever is placed in front of them, and then they will ask for seconds, and also a copy of your recipe. Print the recipe in advance, so you look gracious and artfully prepared. And send a thank you bread and butter note to the New York Times. Frittata with Zucchini, Goat Cheese and Dill. https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1013528-frittata-with-zucchini-goat-cheese-and-dill?mcubz=3

Labor Day is over, and hurricane season is upon us, but it is still warm in the evenings, so it is still seasonally appropriate to serve salad as a main course. Luckily this recipe takes care of a pound and a half of those pesky zucchini. Plus it uses up those four ears of perfect corn that you couldn’t resist at the last minute on your prowl through the farmers’ market. Efficiency! Seasonal vegetables! Pretty zucchini blossoms! Martha will envy you. https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/corn-and-zucchini-salad-with-feta-51242120

You might be running low on friends and dinner invitations by now. But just in case your iPhone vibrates with a sudden text to come next door for an impromptu drink, consider having a quart (or two) of Sichuan Pickles on hand to bring along. Your friends won’t suspect anything, since you won’t be clutching a large brown paper bag while edging furtively into their house. This is a glorious host-y gift, particularly if you package it nicely. Think green garden twine, and Mason jars, and vintage labels. Lovely. http://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/sichuan-pickles

I have been sweater shopping. It’s ridiculous, I know. It’s going to be in the high 70s and low 80s next week. And I have also been thinking about socks, and long pants. I guess I am really ready for a change in the weather, and the first day of autumn. Thursday can’t get here quickly enough for me. So this weekend I am going to pull out the stock pot, and make a vat o’soup, and use up another couple of pounds of zucchini. Please join us. I have some very special pickles to share with you, too. And don’t forget to take a loaf of zucchini bread home with you. There’s one over on the table by the front door, tucked in a big brown paper bag of homegrown zucchini. It was so nice to have you over!

Zucchini Soup à la The River Café

Serves 4
Ingredients:
• 2 1/4 pounds zucchini
• 2 tablespoons olive oil
• 2 garlic cloves
• 2 cups chicken (or vegetable) stock
• 1/2 cup heavy cream
• 1 small bunch basil, chopped
• 1 small bunch parsley, chopped
• 1/2 cup grated Parmesan
• salt and pepper

Crouton:
6 slices Ciabatta bread, cut at an angle
2 garlic cloves
Olive oil

Directions:
1. Cut the zucchini lengthwise into quarters, then into 1 inch pieces. Heat the oil in a heavy bottomed sauce pan and cook the garlic and
zucchini very slowly over low heat until the zucchini is brown and quite soft (around 25 minutes).
2. Add salt, pepper, and stock, and simmer for a few minutes. Remove from the heat.
3. Put three-quarters of the zucchini into a food processor and puree. Return the puree to the pan and add the cream, basil, parsley and
Parmesan.

To make crouton, toast the bread on both sides. Rub garlic on the toasted bread, and drizzle with olive oil. Tear into massive chunks, and drop artfully onto soup, in individual bowls. Enjoy!

Zucchini Soup, adapted from The River Café Cook Book, by Rose Gray and Ruth Rogers

“The trouble is, you cannot grow just one zucchini. Minutes after you plant a single seed, hundreds of zucchini will barge out of the ground and sprawl around the garden, menacing the other vegetables. At night, you will be able to hear the ground quake as more and more zucchinis erupt.”
-Dave Barry

The Mid-Atlantic Symphony Orchestra Turns Twenty with Julien Benichou and Jeffrey Parker

One way to appreciate how remarkable it is that the Mid-Atlantic Symphony Orchestra will be twenty years old this season is to translate that achievement into dog years. For every year a large, well financed, metropolitan orchestra thrives in places like Washington and Baltimore, one might add seven years to any small regional symphony orchestra who survives without the large audiences and donors that major cities provide their cultural institutions.

That 1:7 factor is useful in bringing into focus the stunning accomplishment the MSO will be celebrating the year. Despite its relatively small market niche in communities like Easton, Ocean Pines, or Annapolis, the Mid-Atlantic Symphony Orchestra has consistently beaten the odds. Year after year, the MSO has not only finished every season successfully paying their musicians, the first test of sustainability, but gained more and more grateful patrons at the same time.

The secrets to the remarkable outcome can be found in the exceptional quality of programming offered by its brilliant music director, Julien Benichou, now completing ten years at the helm, and the passion and dedication of its board members, like the Symphony’s  current president, Jeffrey Parker. But this remarkable track record can also be attributed to the dedication of literally hundreds season subscribers on the Shore.

The Spy sat down with Julien and Jeffrey last week at Bullitt House to talk about the MSO’s anniversary plans and a sneak preview of what the season’s opening concert will include as the Mid-Atlantic Symphony Orchestra takes to the stage at the Todd Performing Arts Center at Chesapeake College on September 28th.

This video is approximately four minutes in length. For more information about the The Mid-Atlantic Symphony Orchestra’s 2oth season please go here

 

Easton Sidewalks: A Little Bit of France on Hanson

While it is pretty clear that the homeowner’s primary intention for the exterior of their charming cottage on Hanson Street was to pay homage to famed 82nd Airborne Division of the United States Army, it doesn’t go unnoticed that there is also an effort to provide a French country theme to the house that was built in 1725.

In fact, this effort, as seen from certain vantage points from Hanson Street, is rather successful in replicating a small French village home complete with French signage, lighting, and candles in the window that make it a cozy landmark as one walks to Easton’s downtown.

Vive la Hanson only on Easton’s Sidewalks.