Avalon’s Weekend Marquee Update

The Talbot Spy will be sharing with our readers each week the MCTV produced Weekend Marquee with Tim Weigand as host. We hope you enjoy this short two minute preview of what’s coming up over the next few days.

Oxford Prepares for Plein Air 2017

The picturesque town of Oxford, Maryland will host 2017 Plein Air Easton artists throughout the day on Sunday, 16 July. This will be a great day in our watermen’s town, with artists painting at various historic and scenic places in Oxford. To mark this occasion, a full day of events has been planned for our locals and visitors alike. We hope your plans for the weekend include a stop in Oxford to watch this year’s Plein Air Easton artists paint one-of-a-kind scenes from the town and waterways.

The Oxford Business Association is sponsoring this event, with support from the local businesses. It will be a ‘family–friendly’ day, with music and activities for everyone. You can bring your pooch along, too; we even have a dog park for him. Don’t forget a blanket or lawn chair to relax in the park, or to take in the live music, which will be offered in the afternoon at the Oxford Community Center.

For early risers, the Oxford Market will offer ‘free coffee with purchase of a muffin’ to start the day. A short stop away you’ll find the Oxford Museum open from 11 am to 4 pm. Outdoor activities during the day include watercraft rentals at the Strand from Dockside Boat Rentals, 1 – 5 pm. No visit to Oxford is complete without a ferry ride. Be sure to hop aboard ($5.00 per pedestrian) and traverse the Tred Avon River to enjoy the scenery. The ferry is an iconic landmark not only in Maryland, but also on the entire Eastern seaboard. A walking tour of Oxford will leave from the Ferry Dock at 10 a.m. Join Oxford resident Leo Nollmeyer for the history of our town.

Thirsty? Stop by the Treasure Chest from 10 am to 4 pm; free lemonade will be available. You are sure to find a variety of unique gifts and artwork inside, as well. Yacht and Home, newly opened across from the Oxford Market, will be offering iced tea and Plein Air Sugar Cookies to their visitors.

Oxford is also home to Mystery Loves Company Booksellers – a truly special bookstore located conveniently next to the Oxford Town Park. To mark the occasion of the Second Annual Paint Oxford Day, author Stephanie Verni will be on-site (1-3 pm) and signing copies of “Inn Significant,” appropriately set on the Eastern Shore, of course.

Be sure to take a stroll down Tilghman Street to the Scottish Highland Ice Creamery, which will be open from noon until 8:30 pm. They will feature a special “Plein Air Sorbet” as well as several other original and tempting flavors of the day.

While you watch the artists at work around town, you’ll no doubt notice a variety of painted picket fences prominently on display. Be sure to pick up a Picket Fence Map at local business locations, and stroll through town to view another form of original artwork. There are 9 new picket fences this year, as well as several others from years past.

Towards day’s end, head to the Oxford Community Center to see the artists’ completed, framed accomplishments. Paintings may be on display as early as noon for viewing and purchase, but the full Artist Exhibition (accompanied by available nibbles and beverages) will be from 5:00 to 6:30 pm. Capping off activities at that venue, the President of the Oxford Business Association will announce and present the coveted Artists’ Choice award.

By then, you’ll be just in time to enjoy dinner at one of our many fine restaurants before leaving town. Where will you be on 16 July? Why not ‘Come see why we love it here?’

For more information, go to portofoxford.com

Week Two of the Chesapeake Chamber Music Festival Opens with a Czech Concert

Pianist Robert McDonald

The second week of the renowned Chesapeake Chamber Music Festival will begin with a lively Czech-inspired concert and reception on Sunday, June 11 at 3 p.m. at the Aspen Institute, situated on the banks of the Wye River.  A Czech-inspired picnic will follow the concert and will include such delicacies as Czech-style latkes and meatballs, a variety of savory open-faced sandwiches and dips, wild mushroom tarts and salmon croquettes, as well as trifles, bread puddings and compotes for dessert.

According to Festival pianist Robert McDonald, “The Sunday concert at the Aspen Institute is drawn from the works of the three most important Czech composers—Dvorak, Janacek, and Smetana. Their styles succeed at being both strongly individual and complimentary all at once. National folk influences along with heartfelt emotional directness represent the defining strengths in their music.”

The Smetana G Minor Trio that closes the June 11 program is a tribute to Smetana’s beloved four-year old daughter who had died and, according to McDonald, is one of the truly memorable works in the Romantic chamber music literature.

During the week, Festival-goers will then be enthralled by the energetic music of Italian, French, Hungarian and Russian composers at concerts to be held at the Oxford Community Center, the Academy Art Museum and the Avalon Theatre.  And, after enjoying the music of Italian composers Vivaldi and Tartini at the Oxford Community Center on Wednesday, June 14 at 5:30 p.m., concert-goers can make reservations afterwards for an optional, Italian-themed dinner created by Chef Mark Salter at the Robert Morris Inn.

McDonald adds, “Though most concert programs that we play are constructed of works by composers from a variety of national backgrounds, it is always refreshing to put together recitals that draw exclusively from a single country as inspiration. This offers listener and performer alike a chance to compare the enormous range of musical styles that exist under the umbrella of a shared language, history, and national customs.”

Musicians performing at the Avalon Theatre at the opening concert of this year’s Chesapeake Chamber Music Festival. Photo by Cal Jackson.

The Festival wraps up with the Angels Concert at Watermelon Point in Easton featuring music of Latin America, with a catered reception by Gourmet by the Bay. The reception will feature such Eastern Shore favorites as crab-n-corn fritters with red pepper remoulade and charred vegetable gazpacho with lump crab, as well as such Latin favorites as fried plantains with a spicy pineapple relish and a tapas buffet including vegetable empanadas, chorizo stuffed mushrooms with queso blanco, and jerk chicken drummettes. Desserts will include salted dulce de leche tarts, banana coconut pudding shots, chocolate tres leches cake bites, and key lime raspberry tarts.

Sponsors of this year’s Festival include the Talbot County Arts Council, the Maryland State Arts Council, The Star Democrat, Talbot Spy, and What’s Up Media. Additional generous financial support from corporate, public and private benefactors enables Chesapeake Music to offer affordable tickets for Festival concerts and recitals; open rehearsals are free to the general public. 

This year’s concerts offer the opportunity to travel the world through an incredible variety of music with internationally-acclaimed artists right here on the Eastern Shore.  To purchase tickets, visit www.ChesapeakeMusic.org or call 410 819-0380. To make reservations for the optional fixed-price dinner at the historic Robert Morris Inn, call 410-226-5111. Registrations for the Angels Concert must be made by June 12.

An Enchanted Midsummer Evening with Shore Shakespeare

With its production of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” Shore Shakespeare brings one of the bard’s most fanciful comedies to the stage.

Nominally set in and around Athens during the golden age of Greek culture, the play quickly expands its classical setting to bring in a group of English tradespeople – and then shifts gears yet again to the magical world of elves and fairies. And just to make sure nobody leaves the theater without something to remember, the play includes a love story, a series of magical enchantments, songs, dances, and a play within the play. Shakespeare was clearly having fun when he concocted this one – and the Shore Shakespeare production makes sure that comes across to the audience.

This is Christian Rogers’ debut as a director, and he has done a fine job of bringing the play to life. One of the founders of Shore Shakespeare, Rogers has played major roles in a number of the company’s productions, including MacDuff in last year’s “MacBeth,” Rogers said after the Sunday performance at Adkins Arboretum that he wished he could be on stage instead of watching from the sound booth. But he shows real talent as a director, and while it would be a pity to lose him completely as an actor, the impact of this production makes one hope that he will take the opportunity to direct again not too far down the road.

There are essentially three plot lines in the play. The first involves a love story in the Athenian aristocracy. Lysander and Hermia love one another and wish to marry; but Demetrius also loves Hermia, and wishes to marry her – and her father favors Demetrius’ case. Meanwhile, Helena, who loves Demetrius, is out in the cold. And by Athenian law, Hermia must obey her father or forever renounce marriage – or be put to death. Lysander and Hermia take matters in their own hands and flee for a remote village, where they plan to marry – and hope the law will not reach them.

Meanwhile, in that same village, a group of tradesmen is planning to put on a play in hopes of winning a prize. The theme is the love story “Pyramus and Thisbe,” and the incongruity of the casting and the amateur actors’ attempts to adjust the plot so as not to frighten ladies in the audience make up much of the fun of this subplot.

The third plot brings in Oberon, king of the faeries, who is arguing with his queen Titania. To get his wishes, Oberon sends his servant Puck to find a magical flower that will make his queen fall in love with the first thing she sees upon awakening, hoping to use the spell to get her to accede to his wishes.

Of course all three groups end up in the same section of the forest, where the mingling of mortals with magic generates much confusion and many laughs. But we don’t need to summarize the whole plot – everybody read the play in high school, right?

Rogers has assembled his cast from among the regulars at Shore Shakespeare, and there’s not a weak performance among them. At the center of the play are the four lovers.

Lovers face off in the enchanted forest in Shore Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”

Troy Strootman plays Lysander, and Robbie Spray is Demetrius; Heather Oland takes the role of Helena and Christine Kinlock that of Hermia. All four have numerous credits in local theater, though Oland and Strootman are making their first appearances with Shore Shakespeare. All carry their parts well, running the gamut of emotions from besotted love to jealous fury. Bravo to each! The lovers’ fight scene near the end is especially well-played and well=choreographed, with Helena jumping on Lysander’s back and the two men circling each other angrily.

The Athenian nobles and the faery royalty are played by two actors: Brian McGonigle takes the roles of Oberon and of Theseus, Duke of Athens, while Colleen Minahan plays Titania and Hippolyta, Theseus’s bride. Since the characters are never onstage at the same time, this works – and it gives an interesting parallelism to the two courts. And, since Oberon and Titania have far more active parts in the play, it gives them something interesting to do while making sure there are good actors in the secondary roles. Greg Minahan also takes two parts, as Hermia’s father Egeus and as Peter Quince, leader of the troupe of  tradesmen/actors. He distinguishes the two characters nicely – in fact, he’s so good that some audience members might not realize the same actor is playing both.

One of the key roles in the play is Puck, the mischievous faery who does Oberon’s bidding. Avra Sullivan, one of the founders of Shore Shakespeare, is a delight in the role – darting around the stage, mugging, pantomiming magical spells, and on the whole giving a memorable performance. Hard to believe this is the same actor who played Lady MacBeth so effectively last summer! Sullivan trained as a Shakespearean actor, and it has shown clearly with every role she has played with the company.

Bottom (Patrick Fee) and Puck (Avra Sullivan)

The other prime comic role in the play is Bottom the weaver, played broadly by Patrick Fee, another fixture in the Shore theatrical community. Bottom is one of Shakespeare’s most iconic comic characters, the country bumpkin who finds himself in exalted company and proceeds to muddle through. Fee does the character proud – one of his best performances.

The other rustic characters are played equally broadly, with good comic effect. They include Sarah Gorman, Josh Hansen, and Jane and John Tereby. Hansen, a ninth-grader at Wye River Upper School, has already accumulated several theater credits, including two roles in last year’s Shore Shakespeare “MacBeth.” He is appropriately amusing as Flute the bellows-mender, cast as Thisbe, the female lead in the artisans’ play, reciting his lines in a high, squeaky “female” voice. John Tereby gets great fun out of being cast as a wall that separates the lovers; and Gorman, wearing an orange mop, does a nice comic turn as the roaring lion in the tradesmen’s play – a wonderful send-up of amateur theater that rings as true today as it must have in Shakespeare’s time.

The villagers rehearse their play , checking to see if the moon will be full on the night of the performance.  It will.  From left, Greg Minahan, Jane Tereby, Josh Hansen and John Tereby

Lindsey Hammer, making her Shore Shakespeare debut, plays a faery who assists Puck in some of his magical exploits. Her dancing and graceful leaps add greatly to the choreography.

With the performances all taking place outdoors, the sets are minimal. There is effective use of colorful movable trees in some of the forest scenes, especially when the lovers are running through the wood at night, unable to find one another because of Puck’s enchantments. A backdrop with columns gives the general impression of Athens, and a few strategically placed stumps give the actors a chance to rise above the scene for a moment. That’s about it – but it’s effective, and likely true to the way the play would have been staged in many productions in Shakespeare’s era.

The costumes are visually attractive and evoke both the era and the distinct groups of characters. It’s amusing to see the rustics dressed in what could be working-class uniforms – with items such as straw hats, suspenders, vests –  from almost any historical era from the 1600s to today.  It nicely distinguishes them from both the noble Athenians and the flamboyant Faery court, while making a sly nod to the fact that the characters might as well be English country folk of Shakespeare’s time. Kudos to Barbi Bedell and Marcia Gilliam for their costume work.

One of my few quibbles with the production was the decision to represent Puck’s transformation of Bottom’s head into that of a donkey by simply adding donkey’s ears to his straw hat. Granted, a more traditional papier-mache donkey’s head could cause problems for the actor in seeing and moving, as well as being uncomfortable if the temperature climbs too high – as it can in June. But with nothing more than the ears on his hat, the other actors’ horrified reaction to Bottom’s transformation seems less believable. Something along the lines of a “Groucho” nose or a donkey’s tail would add humor and help the audience see the magic come alive.

A nice touch is the background music, which mingles Felix Mendelssohn’s score for the play with more modern pieces, including selections by Gounod, Stravinsky, Ravel and Prokofiev – plus some original music by Greg Minahan. The music for the rustics’ final exuberant dance, choreographed by Minahan, is especially appropriate – it’s a nice bit of fun I won’t give away here.

For that matter, the whole production is fun. The actors are clearly enjoying themselves, and it’s contagious. Be sure to see it when it comes to your part of the Shore — and bring the whole family. You couldn’t ask for a better way to spend a summer evening.

Shore Shakespeare will be presenting “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” this coming Friday and Saturday, June 9 and 10, at Oxford Community Center, and Sunday, June 11 at Idlewild Park in Easton. The next weekend, the production moves to Long Wharf Park in Cambridge for one performance, Friday, June 16. Saturday and Sunday, June 17 and 18, Shore Shakespeare will be on Cray House Lawn in Stevensville. The summer run closes with two performances in Chestertown’s Wilmer Park, Friday and Sunday, June 23 and 25.
Admission to all performances is free; audience members should bring lawn chairs or blankets to sit on. Performances are at 6 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 3 p.m. Sundays. For more information, visit shoreshakespeare.com.

Photos by Jane Jewell

Free Concert Brings Vintage Rockabilly to Cambridge Waterfront

A free concert on the waterfront on Friday, June 9 features the vintage rockabilly sounds of Josh Christina. The show begins at 7pm at the Sailwinds Amphitheater, the grassy area next to the Dorchester County Visitor Center.

This young, rising musician out of Baltimore already has three solo CDs outfeaturing his early American rock ‘n’ roll with an upbeat blend of rock, country, gospel and blues. His Nashville producer Kent Wells (who also happens to be Dolly Parton’s producer)told the Baltimore Sun in an interview, “He could have easily held his own with Jerry Lee, Mickey Gilley and Fats Domino back in the day. He’s an old soul, and the music just pours out of him.”

Although he’s only 22, he blows audiences away with the way he can play Hank Williams, B.B. King, Fats Domino and Jerry Lee—leading some listeners to ask if he’s reincarnated.

The Sailwinds Amphitheater is located next to 2 Rose Hill Place in Cambridge. Audience members are encouraged to bring a blanket and their dancing shoes. Food and drink will be available for purchase.

The Josh Christina concert is sponsored by Cabin Creek Animal Hospital in East New Market and the Wine Bar in downtown Cambridge.

The concert is part of an ongoing series of “At the Sail” events designed to invite the community and visitors to enjoy the beautiful public space on the Choptank River waterfront. For more information and upcoming shows, go to VisitDorchester.org.

Delmarva Review: The Bone Bag by Michael Keenan Gutierrez

They don’t tell you there will be bone. That it will be white. That it will have texture. You thought it would just be ash, like that of fire pits, the dead ends of cigarettes.

Why did you think this? Films, perhaps? You don’t know, but as with so much of the territory you’ve traveled, you’ve brought the wrong map.

According to the website for the National Funeral Directors Association, cremation is a “two-step” process, where first the body is “heated” for two hours at between 1400-1800 degrees, and afterwards the remains are put through a “processor” and what’s left is supposed to come out uniform, industrial, a sort of pre-fab mourning.

That’s not what you see though.

You see your father’s bones. You see them in your hand. You see them slip through your fingers and drop into the water to be taken out by the breakers.

Even though he died four months earlier, you can’t get home right away because of work, because your adult life won’t let you, because you’ve already drained your savings on a last minute flight during the summer, just a few weeks before he died, when he’d been too high on morphine to remember you’d ever visited. He didn’t remember you dressing him, turning on his oxygen. He didn’t remember you pulling away his cigarettes when he was on that oxygen. You’re glad about this.

When you finally do come home for Christmas, your mother shows you the box she’s kept in a guest closet. You’d been expecting an urn—like the movies, again—but no, it’s just a simple brown box, a carton really, something for shoes. Inside his ash and bone are sealed in a plastic bag, the kind you’d get at a carnival, but instead of water and goldfish, there’s this sort of dust.

You think of Star Wars, when at the end of Return of the Jedi, Luke burns Darth Vader’s remains on a pyre. Some part of you wishes you’d done the same. That primal part of you wants that ritual, to have the rite of passage consecrated formally, but you know it takes you two hours to build a shitty campfire and then there’d be the stench and the sight of his body burning and you know you haven’t the stomach for it.

So you settle for a bag inside a box.

The day after Christmas, you and your family all put on something nice and you walk out to the nearby beach and look out at the dark Pacific. It’s a beautiful beach. It should be, for him. It should be because you got married here the previous Christmas. He was there, sallow and struggling to stay standing. But he’d endured, long enough to see you marry.

You don’t talk.

You lead your sister to the line where high tide meets dry sand and she is holding your arm as if you’re walking her down the aisle, except she can hardly stand. Your mother opens the box and pulls out the bag and your future brother-in-law slips you a pocketknife because you hadn’t thought of that.

Now you’ve also got your mother’s arm and while your wife and future brother-in-law and aunts and uncles hang back on dry land, you and your mother and sister make for the water. You shed your shoes and wade in. In December, the Pacific here averages 59 degrees and you feel the shock run over your feet and up your calves.

You go knee deep then think about the knife, but your mother has already dug her thumb into the bag and each of you takes a handful. That’s when you see the bone. It’s not uniform. It’s not pre-fab. It’s definitely a man. It was him.

You scatter him into the water, careful not to get him on your pants, but he does anyways. A small wave surprises you, and all three of you jump and you’re soaked but laughing. Why are you laughing? Because it is ridiculous to be out here? Because it is ridiculous that you all put on something nice to wade into cold water to dump him in here? Because what else are you going to do except return to dry land, him beneath your fingernails, and you return to the empty house where died….

The Spy is pleased to republish Mr. Gutierrez’s Pushcart Prize-nominated essay from The Delmarva Review. The ninth edition of the nonprofit literary journal was published by the Eastern Shore Writers Association with support from private contributions and a grant from the Talbot County Arts Council with funds from the Maryland State Arts Council. For more information, visit the website: www.delmarvareview.com.

Michael Keenan Gutierrez is the author of The Trench Angel (Leapfrog Press), a finalist for the James Jones First Novel prize. In addition to The Delmarva Review, his work has been published in The Collagist, Scarab, Public Books, We’re History, The Pisgah Review, Untoward, The Boiler, and Crossborder. He lives with his wife in Chapel Hill where he teaches writing at the University of North Carolina.

Chamber Music Kicks Off Extraordinary Chamber Music Festival June 4

Festival-goers will experience the extraordinary as they travel the world through classical music at Chesapeake Music’s Annual Chesapeake Chamber Music Festival, which will be held from June 4 through June 18, 2017. Artistic Directors Marcy Rosen and J. Lawrie Bloom have developed an exciting program featuring 10 concerts over two music-filled weeks, including the premiere of a Primosch Quintet commissioned for Chesapeake Music.

The Festival includes acclaimed musicians from the world stage, renowned musical ensembles, and a range of familiar classics—Beethoven, Mozart, Gershwin, Ravel, Liszt, Tchaikovsky and more from Germany, Austria, Czechoslovakia, Italy, Hungary, Russia, Latin America, France and the United States. Each concert represents composers from a different country. Several concerts will include receptions with food and beverage pairings echoing the music of that country.

The opening concert at the Avalon Theatre will whet Festival-goers appetites for what’s to come with a potpourri of music from around the world and a pre-concert reception where guests can mix and mingle with old friends. Jonathan Palevsky of WBJC will provide live concert commentary that night to kick off the Festival. There will be an opportunity for patrons to visit informally with Jonathan and he will talk about this year’s festival theme, “A Tour of the World,” and the enticing global sampler on the program for the evening. On Friday evening at Christ Church, Easton, concert-goers will be treated to music from the United States, including the magic of Gershwin’s Lullaby for string quartet and Barber’s Adagio for string quartet. Thanks to the generosity of Arnold and Zena Lerman, this concert will also feature the premiere of a Primosch Quintet for oboe, violin, viola, cello and piano, commissioned for Chesapeake Music and performed by Peggy Pearson, Diane Walsh, Catherine Cho and others. In addition to “Mozart by the Sea” at the Tred Avon Yacht Club, during the first week, concert-goers can also travel to Trinity Cathedral to enjoy Germany’s Beethoven and Brahms.

Sponsors of this year’s Festival include the Talbot County Arts Council, the Maryland State Arts Council, The Star Democrat, Talbot Spy, and What’s Up Media. Additional generous financial support from corporate, public and private benefactors enables Chesapeake Music to offer affordable tickets for Festival concerts and recitals; open rehearsals are free to the general public.

This year’s concerts offer the opportunity to travel the world through an incredible variety of music with internationally-acclaimed artists right here on the Eastern Shore. To purchase tickets, visit www.ChesapeakeMusic.org or call 410 819-0380.

Week One Schedule – June 4 – 9, 2017

Sunday, June 4, 5:30 p.m.
Opening Concert: Avalon Theatre, Easton
“A Tour of the World”
Artists: Catherine Cho, Todd Phillips, Marcy Rosen, Diane Walsh

Tuesday, June 6, 5:30 p.m.
Concert: Trinity Cathedral, Easton
Germany
Artists: Catherine Cho, Marcy Rosen, Robert McDonald

Wednesday, June 7, 10 a.m.
Open Rehearsal: Academy Art Museum, Easton

Thursday, June 8, 5:30 p.m.
Concert: Tred Avon Yacht Club, Oxford
Austria – “Mozart by the Sea”
Artists: Peggy Pearson, Catherine Cho, Kim Kashkashian, Marcy Rosen, Wei Ping Chou, Tessa Lark, Dimitri Murrath, Edward Arron, J. Lawrie Bloom, and Todd Phillips

Friday, June 9, 5:30 p.m.
Concert: Christ Church, Easton
United States of America
Primosch Quintet for Oboe, Violin, Viola, Cello and Piano (Premiere)**
Artists: Catherine Cho, Todd Phillips, Kim Kashkashian, Marcy Rosen, Peggy Pearson, Dimitri Murrath, Edward Arron, Diane Walsh, Tessa Lark
** This work was commissioned for Chesapeake Music through the generosity of Arnold and Zena Lerman

Saturday, June 10, 7:30 p.m.
Concert: Academy Art Museum, Easton
France
Artists: Diane Walsh, Catherine Cho, Marcy Rosen, J. Lawrie Bloom, Edward Arron, Wei-Ping Chou, Robert McDonald, Tessa Lark, and Dimitri Murrath

Spy Art Tip: AAM’s First Studio Sale with Katie Cassidy

Another first for the Academy Art Museum will take place on Saturday. For the first ever, the museum will be hosting a studio sale event, which means that AAM instructors, artists and students are cleaning out their studios and selecting artwork to be featured in a one-day sale.

As Academy instructor Katie Cassidy notes in our short Spy moment, the good news is that none of the artwork being offered will cost over $300.

This video is approximately one minute in length. For more information about the Academy Art Museum please go here.

The Studio Sale
Saturday, June 3
10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Academy Art Museum
106 South St
Easton, MD 21601

 

Chamber Music Kicks Off Extraordinary Two-Week Festival On June 4

Festival-goers will experience the extraordinary as they travel the world through classical music at Chesapeake Music’s Annual Chesapeake Chamber Music Festival, which will be held from June 4 through June 18, 2017.  Artistic Directors Marcy Rosen and J. Lawrie Bloom have developed an exciting program featuring 10 concerts over two music-filled weeks, including the premiere of a Primosch Quintet commissioned for Chesapeake Music.

The Festival includes acclaimed musicians from the world stage, renowned musical ensembles, and a range of familiar classics—Beethoven, Mozart, Gershwin, Ravel, Liszt, Tchaikovsky and more from Germany, Austria, Czechoslovakia, Italy, Hungary, Russia, Latin America, France and the United States.  Each concert represents composers from a different country.  Several concerts will include receptions with food and beverage pairings echoing the music of that country. 

Kim Kashkashian, an internationally-recognized voice on viola who will perform at the “Mozart by the Sea” concert at the Tred Avon Yacht Club (left) and Violinist Tessa Lark who will appear at the “Mozart by the Sea” and Christ Church USA concerts (right).

The opening concert at the Avalon Theatre will whet Festival-goers appetites for what’s to come with a potpourri of music from around the world and a pre-concert reception where guests can mix and mingle with old friends.  Jonathan Palevsky of WBJC will provide live concert commentary that night to kick off the Festival. On Friday evening at Christ Church, Easton, concert-goers will be treated to music from the United States, including the magic of Gershwin’s Lullaby for string quartet and Barber’s Adagio for string quartet. Thanks to the generosity of Arnold and Zena Lerman, this concert will also feature the premiere of a Primosch Quintet for oboe, violin, viola, cello and piano, commissioned for Chesapeake Music and performed by Peggy Pearson, Diane Walsh, Catherine Cho and others.  In addition to “Mozart by the Sea” at the Tred Avon Yacht Club, during the first week, concert-goers can also travel to Trinity Cathedral to enjoy Germany’s Beethoven and Brahms.

Sponsors of this year’s Festival include the Talbot County Arts Council, the Maryland State Arts Council, The Star Democrat, Talbot Spy, and What’s Up Media. Additional generous financial support from corporate, public and private benefactors enables Chesapeake Music to offer affordable tickets for Festival concerts and recitals; open rehearsals are free to the general public. 

This year’s concerts offer the opportunity to travel the world through an incredible variety of music with internationally-acclaimed artists right here on the Eastern Shore.  To purchase tickets, visit www.ChesapeakeMusic.org or call 410 819-0380.

Mid-Shore Arts: The Parts and Labor of Artist Stephen Ford

Like many successful artists, Stephen Ford stumbled on a unique process of carving linocut blocks and collagraph plates by simply enjoying the process of creating the work. It was only later, through his gallery in Philadelphia, that he realized that there was enormous interest in this approach with his patrons which led to a trip to Ireland to develop the technique.

Using Éire’s special landscape of exotic moss and other fauna as a motivator and subject, Ford returned to America was an exceptional collection of examples of this technique, which are now on display at the Academy Art Museum for the next few months.

The Spy caught up with him while he was in town to talk about his work.

This video is approximately three minutes in length. For more information about Stephen Ford and the Academy Art Museum please go here