Mid-Atlantic Symphony Orchestra Celebrates Holiday Season

The only professional symphony orchestra on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, the Mid-Atlantic Symphony Orchestra (MSO), is celebrating 20 years of bringing enchantment to audiences from Ocean City, MD to Wye Mills, MD.

Audiences can ring in the holiday season with “Holiday Joy,” in early December celebrating the spirit of the holidays with traditional seasonal favorites. The concerts will be held on Thursday, December 7, 2017 at 7 p.m. at the Avalon Theater in Easton, MD; Saturday, December 9, 2017 at 3 p.m. at the Mariner’s Bethel in Ocean View, DE; and Sunday, December 10, 2017 at 3 p.m. at the Community Church in Ocean Pines, MD. The concerts will feature such favorites as “Sleighride,” selections from Handel’s “Messiah,” Wendel’s “Hanukah Overture,” and selections from Tchaikovsky’s “The Nutcracker,” as well as familiar carols and hymns. Soloists include Leah Hawkins, Soprano; Joe Burgstaller, Trumpet; and Chaz’man Williams-Ali, Tenor.

Pictured are soloists for the Mid-Atlantic Symphony’s “Toast to the New Year” concerts: Sharin Apostolou, Soprano and Ryan McPherson, Tenor.

The orchestra’s “Toast to the New Year” will celebrate the New Year with revelry and music on both New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day. The concerts will be held on Sunday, December 31, 2017 at 7 p.m. at Christ Church in Easton, MD; Monday, January 1, 2018 at 1 p.m. at the Community Church in Ocean Pines, MD. The concerts will feature such compositions as Fledermaus Overture, Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake – Second Movement, 2nd; a duet from “West Side Story,”  “Nocturne from a Midsummer Night’s Dream,” along with an “Auld Lang Syne” sing-along. Soloists include Sharin Apostolou, Soprano and Ryan McPherson, Tenor.

The Mid-Atlantic Symphony Orchestra is supported in part by the Maryland State Arts Council, the Talbot County Arts Council, the Worcester County Arts Council, Sussex County, Delaware and the Community Foundation of the Eastern Shore, Inc.

Tickets to the MSO concerts are available online at midatlanticsymphony.org or by telephone (888) 846-8600.  For further information, visit midatlanticsymphony.org.

St. Michaels Art Trail Closes

The outdoor gallery of five sculptures along the Rails to Trails bike path in St. Michaels has finished its show for 2017.  Conceived and sponsored by local author and environmental activist Ann Hymes, the Art Trail was enthusiastically received as an exciting addition to the well-used path that runs 1.5 miles through town.  Artists were chosen by an open competition, and their work was placed between Boundary Lane and W. Chew Avenue for six months.

“Two of the pieces were sold, and several commissions were generated, which is great,” explained Hymes, “but the real point was to add some fun and surprise to the bike path.  As the guidelines explained, we were looking for work that was ‘edgy, funky, teases the eye and delights the imagination.’  The other two judges, Suzanne Pittenger-Slear (President of Environmental Concern) and Sarah Abel (Planning and Zoning Officer for St. Michaels) and I were very pleased with the variety and creativity of the proposals.”

The winners were Mario Tama, with Leah Bell & Nick Frock for “Cosmic Energy, Earth’s Life Forces” (pictured here); Karen O’Dowd for “Seeking Refuge”; St. Michaels Family YMCA for “Y Recycle?”; Parker Herron for “Yarn Bombing”; and Cole Meyerhoff for “Fisher King.”  Each winner received $500 prize money.

“I’ve heard from a number of people who hoped the art would remain on the path, with more added each year,” said Hymes.  “One woman emailed me just this week that she walks the path often, and that by the end of summer, the sculptures felt like friends.”  That seems a nice addition to the community.

Chesapeake Music Expands Musical Offerings on Mid Shore

Chesapeake Music is on the move, expanding its offerings in new and exciting ways.  The organization was renamed in 2015 to better reflect its overall focus of being a source for live performing arts with year-round concerts. In addition to individual concerts, Chesapeake Music exports something of the Chesapeake’s uniqueness to audiences and to musicians worldwide who take part in its annual Chesapeake Chamber Music Festival every June, the Monty Alexander Jazz Festival every Labor Day weekend, a biennial international Chesapeake Chamber Music Competition, and the new Jazz on the Chesapeake concert series. Chesapeake Music’s YouthReach Program works with area schools to bring a greater exposure of classical and jazz music to area students and its First Strings Program continues to inspire and excite 3rd and 4th graders in area schools by introducing them to the violin.

According to Courtney Kane, President of Chesapeake Music, who moved to Easton with her husband Scott from Chevy Chase, MD in 2010, “What astonished me was the quality of music the organization provides – internationally-recognized musicians performing here on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. The quality has to do with the recognition of the performers who come here. They play in the great halls of music around the world.”

Courtney Kane, President of Chesapeake Music

A number of renowned musicians have graced the stages of Chesapeake Music’s concerts and festivals. Among them are Kim Kashkashian, violist, who performs regularly at Chesapeake Music’s Chamber Music Festival each year. She received a Grammy Award in 2012 for Best Classical Solo Instrumental and in 2016 was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Another talented performer at Chesapeake Music’s Monty Alexander Jazz Festival is vocalist René Marie, who in both 2013 and 2017 had Grammy nominated songs.

Kane, who was born and raised in New Orleans, home of Mardi Gras, Dixieland Jazz and Creole cooking, grew up loving music. Her mother took her children to the symphony programs for children, introducing them to classical music. In addition, her exposure to Dixieland led her to her love of jazz music. Kane comments, “The city has a musical background. I thought living there that what we had was what everyone had.”

Kane, who enjoyed a long career in information technology sales management with IBM and Digital Equipment (DEC), also has managed individual VIP tours in France and for a time lectured on Impressionist art on riverboat tours on the Seine and Rhone rivers. She adds, “It was happenstance that we met friends who were active in Chesapeake Chamber Music. I got involved with it and the more involved I got, the more attached I got. I served as the Gala Chair and Treasurer before becoming Board President in 2016.”

Chesapeake Music is dependent on its volunteers, sponsors, donors, and committed supporters. The organization is always looking for volunteers with experience. Kane comments, “Arts volunteers are about passion. It takes faith and money to grow an arts organization. We have a rich source of volunteers in the communities we serve, but with our expanded offerings, we are always looking for new volunteers.”

In addition to its volunteers, what is unique about Chesapeake Music is the intimacy of its venues. Easton’s vibrant arts community lends itself well to the concerts we provide. These small halls, like the Academy Art Museum, The Avalon Theatre, and local churches, enable the audience to sit a few feet from the performers to take in the concert. Kane credits Executive Director Don Buxton who knows and works with every outstanding production technician within a day’s drive. She adds, “Our promise is to give our audience reliably the best in live performances, delivered locally, and at a reasonable cost. What we hope is that you will make an occasion of every event.”

The organization’s growth began when the annual Chamber Music Festival grew from a one-day festival in 1985 into a two-week event held in early June each year. Today, the Festival includes 13 concerts, recitals and open rehearsals in venues ranging from concert halls to churches, museums and waterfront estates. In 1997, the Festival established the concept of a satellite concert outside its base in Talbot County. Satellite concerts have been held in Oxford, St. Michaels, and more recently Queenstown.

In 2002, the organization expanded its operation to include the Chesapeake Chamber Music Competition, a competition for young emerging chamber music ensembles. In 2004, the first biennial Competition became international in scope, drawing from international conservatories. In 2006, the organization was approached by musician Merideth Buxton, Don Buxton’s wife, to create an outreach program, now institutionalized as First Strings. The short-term goals of First Strings Program are to help elementary school students in third or fourth grade to improve listening, gain self-confidence in performing, use teamwork to exhibit cooperation and self-control, and to have fun while learning the skills needed to play the violin. The program also offers YouthReach concerts featuring world-class musicians demonstrating and discussing their instruments with young musicians.

In July 2008, Eastern Shore Chamber Music Festival became Chesapeake Chamber Music, Inc., to better reflect the organization’s geographic location and scope near the Chesapeake Bay. That same year, Executive Director Don Buxton attended the Chamber Music America’s Annual Meeting in New York City where jazz had been a regular part of the programming.  After discussing the idea among board members about introducing jazz to the organization’s repertory, the following year, in 2009, Chesapeake Chamber Music offered a single concert featuring the renowned jazz pianist Monty Alexander and his trio to test the waters. Since then, that one concert has grown into the Monty Alexander Jazz Festival, featuring seven jazz events over Labor Day weekend each year, and drawing enthusiastic audiences from throughout the region. Most recently, Jazz on the Chesapeake expanded its programs by creating a jazz concert series to be held throughout the calendar year.

Kane reflects, “As we look to our future, our new name reflects the vision of Chesapeake Music – to continue to grow as the premier provider of professional live music performances. We continue to look for ways to be relevant in our diverse community.” She adds, “In the future, we plan to keep our programming fresh with new artists coming every year. We are planning farther out with our events. We also continue to collaborate with the Talbot County Arts Council and other organizations, as we are doing this year with our Artists-in-Residence program with the local schools.”

Chesapeake Music’s upcoming international Chamber Music Competition in April is one of the best competitions for young musicians in the world. Many great artists’ careers have been launched after receiving awards at the Competition, like the Harlem Quartet, who won the Grammy for Best Instrumental Composition in 2013, along with The Calidore String Quartet, who received the 2017 Lincoln Center Emerging Artists Award.

For further information about Chesapeake Music and upcoming events, visit chesapeakemusic.org or call 410-819-0380.

Gallery Notes: George Hamilton and Kathy Kopec at A.M. Gravely Gallery

“Winter’s Grip” oil Artist: Kathy Kopec

During the months of November and December, local award winning artists, George Hamilton and Kathy Kopec, will exhibit their oil paintings at the A.M. Gravely Gallery, 408 S. Talbot Street, St. Michaels. Gallery Hours are Friday and Saturday, 10am to 6pm, and Sunday and Monday 10am to 3pm.

St. Michaels Snow by George Hamilton

 

For more information contact A.M. Gravely Gallery at 410/745-5059, email: amgart@aol.com, or go to www.amgravelygallery.com.

Fabulous Christmas Decorations at Trippe-Hilderbrandt Gallery

Trippe-Hilderbrandt Gallery is excited to be hosting a very special trunk show during “First Weekend” in December featuring the fabulous Christmas wreaths, table centerpieces and special Christmas decorations designed by Glittermoon Vintage Christmas from Richmond, Virginia.

In 2011, the owner and Eastern Shore native, Cackie Trippe McCarty launched Glittermoon Vintage Christmas: unique designs made from ornaments and decorations of yesteryear. Having had a longtime love of old Christmas things, she admires the craftsmanship and creativity that went into making them. But, as a child of the 1950s, she especially loves the wonderful memories these pieces evoke. One day, she saw a magazine article about how to make an ornament wreath so she made one for herself using mostly broken ornaments that she loved too much to throw away. It turned out so well that she decided to start making them to sell as an adjunct to her other artwork.

Cackie searches high and low for the most unusual, beautiful, and truly special decorations. These wonderful pieces have been gently loved, often by several generations in the same family. She especially loves it when someone points to an ornament and says, “My grandmother (or mother or aunt) had one of these!”

Every piece Cackie makes is unique; there will never be another one like it. This is not only because of the materials themselves (as in what she has in her inventory) but she maintains that she would be bored to tears if she had to reproduce previous designs. She tries to begin each wreath (or centerpiece) with something very special as a focal point. Loving the mental stimulation of design, she lets color, scale, and texture drive the design. Generally, it takes parts of 3 days to make a wreath from start to finish.

Cackie’s wreaths and topiaries have a national following and have been shipped all over the continental USA. She is a proud member of the Beekman 1802 artisan collective (Beekman1802.com, based in upstate NY) and has been featured in R Home Magazine (November 2014) and the Los Angeles Times (December 2015). Mariah Carey owns one of her wreaths – a pink one, naturally. Her work has also been displayed at Zézé Flowers (2013) and More & More Antiques (2016), both in Manhattan, and at a handful of other shops on the East Coast. In 2015, one of her wreaths was auctioned at a charity benefit for the Kips Bay Boys & Girls Club in NYC.

Photographer Steve Lingeman at Tidewater Camera Club December 4

Photographer Steve Lingeman will address the Tidewater Camera Club on Monday, December 4th, 2017 from 7 to 9 PM in the Talbot County Community Center’s Wye Oak Room.  The Public is invited to attend.

Mr. Lingeman’s talk is entitled – “Creating your own Personal Project”.  Photographers and artists who have a desire to extend their collection of individual images into a unified collection will be interested in this presentation.  Mr. Lingeman will cover a range of topics such as the preliminary work of assembling and curating images into a group, sequencing the images and creating a text of the story.”

The presentation will cover various ways of presenting the photographer’s or artist’s work in printed form including self-printed publications or portfolios of images within a formal box.  He will give advice regarding sending images to an outside internet style company for printing.  A number of examples of Mr. Lingeman’s personal projects will be shown, including several projects he assembled, curated and printed for other photographers and artists.  Additional topics to be covered are the use of Photoshop to create such a self-printed publication, and the use of typefaces and layout.  Binding and the selection of a cover will also be addressed.

Mr. Lingeman has been a photographer since the 1960’s. Before moving to Easton several years ago, Mr. Lingeman was a large format printer for other photographers and artists in Westchester County, New York, utilizing large inkjet printers up to 64” wide. He developed a stretcher bar system for stretching photographs and art reproductions. That system is still used by several photographers here in Talbot County.In the past year Mr. Lingeman has printed the first two issues of “The Photographic MEGAZINE.” The first one featured landscape photographs that he captured in Iceland while traveling the “Ring Road”, an 880-mile highway that encircles the country. The issue tells the story of that trip in fine art photos and text. The second issue, titled: “Form and Texture” is a collection of Mr. Lingeman’s images dating back to the dawn of digital photography in year 2000 and others that were captured using Kodak film.

Founded in 1963, the Tidewater Camera Club strives to promote interest and participation in photography for all skill levels and ages.  For more information, go to www.tidewatercameraclub.org.

Christ Church to Host Annapolis Chamber Ensemble and Two World-Class Pianists

The Christ Church Concert Series in Easton continues its 2017-18 season this Sunday afternoon at 4 pm featuring the Annapolis Chamber Players.  The ensemble whose members have been collaborating for more than fifteen years is composed of some of the finest musicians in the Baltimore-Washington DC area.  Known for their eclectic programs with repertoire ranging from the eighteenth through the twenty-first centuries, the ensemble specializes in mixed chamber music for winds, strings, and piano. Unlike homogeneous chamber groups, such as a string quartet or woodwind quintet, the Annapolis Chamber Players’ diverse instrumental colors and flexible instrumentation offers a variety of musical colors and styles.

Woobin Park and Stefan Petrov

While all six of the ensemble’s members unite to amass a most impressive cache of honors and distinctions, its two pianists, each a world-class talent, will perform on Sunday’s concert. Dr. Woobin Park made her Carnegie Hall debut in 2010 to critical acclaim. The New York Concert Review raved“…Park gave a brilliant performance, handling the virtuosity with beautiful sense of style…” She has appeared throughout the United States and South Korea in solo and chamber recitals as well as solo performances with orchestra. Park has performed in distinguished concert venues including Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall, Steinway Hall in New York, Strathmore Hall in Washington D.C., Elizabeth Horowitz Performing Arts Center in Maryland, Tedmann Concert Hall in Minneapolis, Auer Concert Hall in Bloomington, Indiana and Preston Bradley Hall of the Chicago Cultural Center. Her live performances have been nationally broadcast on WFMT in Chicago and KSJN in Minneapolis. Woobin has earned prizes in several competitions including the Los Angeles Liszt International Piano Competition, where she was also awarded “Best Performance of the Required Work,” San Nicola di Bari International Piano Competition in Italy, University of Minnesota Concerto Competition, and American Protege International Competition of Romantic Music. On Sunday, Dr. Park will perform Carl Frühling’s Trio for Clarinet, Violoncello and Piano, Op. 40 with clarinetist and ensemble director, Phyllis Richardson and cellist Dorotea Racz.  In addition to her performing career and masterclasses throughout the country, Dr. Park serves on the piano faculty at Washington College.

American-Bulgarian pianist Stefan Petrov, whose arresting interpretations and broad musical versatility has captivated classical music audiences as a soloist and a chamber musician in venues across Europe, North America and the Caribbean, will perform Johannes Brahms’ Trio in E-flat Major for Piano, Violin and French, Op. 40 along with violinist Kristen Bakkegard and hornist, Heidi Brown. Mr. Petrov’s performances have been broadcast on CBC (Canada), WDAV(NC), WFMT (Chicago), WMRA(VA) and Bulgarian National TVand Radio. He has appeared in Steinway Hall (New York, NY), Steinway Series at the Smithsonian Museum (Washington D.C.), the Bulgarian National Palace of Culture, Teatro Nacional (Dominican Republic), Chicago Cultural Institute and others. Equally at home as a collaborative pianist, Stefan partners frequently with Israeli-American cellist Amit Peled in recitals across the U.S., while also serving as head of the collaborative piano department at the prestigious Heifetz International Music

Sunday’s concert is partially funded by a grant from the Talbot County Arts Council and the Maryland State Arts Council.  Doors open at 3:30 pm, and the public is invited.  A freewill offering will be received to support this and upcoming concerts.  Christ Church is located at 111 S. Harrison Street in downtown Easton. For information call 410-822-2677 or visit www.christchurcheaston.org.

Academy Art Museum Announces New Members Join Board of Trustees

Catherine McCoy

The Museum recently welcomed the following new board members: Daniel Canzoniero of Easton, Craig L. Fuller of Easton, Jeffrey Huvelle of Royal Oak and Washington, DC, and Nanny Trippe of Easton to its Board of Trustees. In addition, outgoing board chair Carolyn Williams of Easton (2010–17) and board member Nancy Appleby (2011–17) of Bozman were honored for their contributions to the Museum’s Board.

Director Ben Simons comments, “Carolyn dedicated her heart and soul to the Museum, and steered it with wisdom, courage, and fortitude through a time of transition and revitalization. She has become a friend and an inspiration to me, as she has to so many. We also salute and thank outgoing Secretary Nancy Appleby, who formed a key part of the leadership during the same period. Carolyn and Nancy will be dearly missed, but of course remain beloved members of the Museum family.”

Cathy McCoy was elected Chair of the Museum’s Board of Trustees, replacing Williams. McCoy, a retired corporate and securities lawyer, enjoyed an over 25-year legal career in the corporate and securities law field, the first half on the staff of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the latter half as a partner in the law firm Arnold & Porter. She has been active in a number of local nonprofits, including serving as board president of the Oxford Community Center, before becoming a trustee of the Academy Art Museum in 2015.

Simons adds, “We welcome Cathy as Chair of the Board of Trustees. As we look ahead to an exciting year celebrating the Museum’s 60th Anniversary, the leadership and future of the Museum could hardly be more secure. I’m also delighted to welcome our new board members. Each brings deep experience and passion for the Museum’s mission and commitment to helping us reach our goals in the coming years.”

New board member Daniel Canzoniero of Easton is Chief Executive Officer of Gamse Lithographing Company, Inc., which produces labels and flexible packaging for food, beverage and other consumer products companies. He serves as a director of the World Trade Center Institute in Baltimore and the Avalon Foundation in Easton, as well as President of The Graphic Source, a buying co-operative of 44 member companies. He is a member of M&T Bank’s Directors’ Council, and active in the Washington, Baltimore and Palm Beach Chapters of Young Presidents Organization (YPO).

Pictured L-R are Ben Simons, Director of the Academy Art Museum with new members of the Museum’s Board of Trustees Nanny Trippe of Easton; Jeffrey Huvelle of Royal Oak and Washington, DC; Daniel Canzoniero of Easton; and Craig L. Fuller of Easton.

Craig L. Fuller of Easton is Chairman of The Fuller Company, a strategic consulting group he organized in 1989. Most recently, he served as the president and CEO of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association. Previously, Fuller served eight years in the White House, first as Assistant to President Reagan for Cabinet Affairs before becoming Chief of Staff to Vice President George H.W. Bush during the second term of the Reagan Administration.  Serving on boards and as an advisor to aviation companies, Fuller has been active in aviation policy matters including serving on the FAA’s Management Advisory Council. Craig served for 10 years as a Trustee of the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and currently serves as a director of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

Jeffrey Huvelle of Royal Oak and Washington, DC, is Senior Counsel with Covington & Burling LLP in Washington, DC. He is leading expert in Labor and Employment Law and has received outstanding achievement awards by the Washington Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights and the Women’s Legal Defense Fund. He received his Juris Doctorate from Columbia Law School and his Bachelor’s Degree from Harvard College. He has served on the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination and in the Peace Corps in Kenya. His civic activities have included being a Board Member, Assistant Commissioner and Coach for Stoddert Soccer in Washington, DC.

Nanny Trippe of Easton is a many-generation native of the Eastern Shore and owner of Trippe-Hilderbrandt Gallery in Easton, which exhibits the work of many fine award-winning artists in all mediums, as well as her own fine art photography. She completed a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art History from Washington College. She has received numerous awards for her photography, including the 2009 Plein Air Easton Award Best in Show, the Best Black and White-Aubrey Bodine Award, 2nd Place 2012 Plein Air Easton Photography Competition, 2015 Photographers Forum: Finalist and published in “Best of Photography 2015.” The Academy Art Museum held solo exhibition of her works in 2016–17: Trees: Majesty and Mystery.

Easton Choral Arts to Celebrate Christmas Season with “Ceremony of Carols”

Easton Choral Arts Society continues its celebratory 40th season with Benjamin Britten’s immensely popular Ceremony of Carols, along with favorite songs of the season. The chorus under Artistic Director Wes Lockfaw, will be accompanied by harpist Rebecca Smith of the National Philharmonic Orchestra. Two performances will be held at Christ Church in downtown Easton, Friday, December 1, and Sunday, December 3.

Considered by many as the most important English composer since Henry Purcell, Britten composed the work in 1942 on his return voyage from the United States. Ceremony of Carols is one of Britten’s best-known and most-performed works. It has been described as a brilliantly conceived and dramatic concert work… enchanting Christmas music, with many wondrous and memorable effects.

It is based on the Ceremony of Nine Lessons and Carols, songs and dances of religious joy, a traditional part of an Anglican Christmas, consisting of hymns and other songs interspersed with Biblical readings.  Britten uses the nine carols without the lessons, to express the various moods surrounding the celebration of this most joyous season. Many of the carol texts reveal the mystery of the Christmas events.

Some of the carols are in Latin; some are in Middle English based on poems from the 15th and 16th centuries. They retain their unique flavor by Britten’s extensive use of old English language in the style of Geoffrey Chaucer’s “Canterbury Tales”. The cantata is made up of 11 movements: 10 with voice and one for solo harp. The work opens and ends with the choir processing to plainsong, and the sections in-between deal with the traditional stories surrounding the birth of Christ.

Harpist Rebecca Smith will provide the sole accompaniment for the Britten piece. Rebecca has enjoyed a distinguished career as a professional harpist and teacher for over 30 years. Her orchestral credits include The Kennedy Center Opera House Orchestra (1980-1990), The National Gallery of Art Orchestra, The Fairfax Symphony Orchestra, The Filene Center Orchestra at Wolf Trap, The Chesapeake Orchestra and The National Philharmonic Orchestra. Additionally, she has served as a guest musician for The National and Baltimore Symphony Orchestras.

Join Easton Choral Arts for the second concert of its 40th Anniversary Season. To order tickets for Friday December 1 at 7:30 pm or Sunday December 3 at 4:00 pm, visit www.eastonchoralarts.org or call 410-200-0498. Advance sale tickets are $25 and are $30 at the door. Students will be admitted free with reservations.

The Easton Choral Arts Society is supported by grants from the Talbot County Arts Council, the Maryland State Arts Council and the Mid-Shore Community Foundation.

Academy Art Museum Announces December Events

David Driskell, The Hibiscus, Linocut.

EXHIBITIONS

Exhibitions are generously supported by the Maryland State Arts Council, the Talbot County Arts Council and the Star Democrat.

David Driskell: Renewal and Form, Recent Prints
Through December 31, 2017
Noted artist and scholar, David Driskell, PhD, (1931) is widely respected as an artist, curator, educator, and scholar of African-American art. The exhibition comes to Easton from the Center for Maine Contemporary Art, in Rockland, ME, and was curated by Greenhut Galleries in Portland, ME.

The Caprichos: Goya and Lombardo
Through February 25, 2018
The Caprichos by Emily Lombardo is a series of etchings which are in direct conversation and homage to Francisco Goya’s Los Caprichos, 1799. Both explore and present a satirical critique of contemporary culture and the forces that influence society along economic, racial, political, religious, and gender lines. The exhibition is supported by the Childs Gallery, Boston.

The Soothsayers: 3D Works on Paper by Emily Lombardo
Through March 11, 2018
A Soothsayer is a person who predicts the future by magical, intuitive, or more rational means; someone who says “sooth,” meaning “truth” or “reality,” a term dating back to the 14th century. The Soothsayers is an installation of sculptural prints, which represent excavated hearts from Magic 8 Ball toys that are positioned as divine relics of cultural nostalgia. The Magic 8 Ball was created in 1950, invented by Albert C. Carter, inspired by a spirit writing device used by his mother, a clairvoyant. The post-World War II boom in industry propelled this toy into thousands of homes across America.

Emily Lombardo, The Soothsayers, 2017, Paper and Pigment, Collection of the Artist.

Beth van Hoesen: Prints: Selections from the Permanent Collection
Through February 4, 2018
Selections Gallery
Beth Van Hoesen (1926–2010) was an American artist who was born in Boise, ID. She earned a BA from Stanford University in 1948. After graduation, she continued her studies at the École des Beaux Arts de Fontainebleau, the Académie Julian, and at the Académie de la Grande Chaumière. Throughout her career, Beth Van Hoesen distinguished herself as a draftsman and printmaker.

SPECIAL EVENTS

Open MIC
Second Monday Each Month
7 to 9 p.m.
The Academy Art Museum’s Open Mic is a monthly occasion for our community to share and appreciate the rich tapestry of creativity, skills and knowledge that thrive in the region. Contact Ray Remesch at RayRemesch@gmail.com for additional information.

CONCERTS

Beth van Hoesen, San Francisco Dahlias, Lithograph, screenprint; printer’s inks on paper.

Cocktails & Concerts
The Suspicious Cheese Lords
Friday, December 1, Cocktails: 5:30 p.m. with Concert: 6 p.m.
Cost: $55 Members, $66 Non-members
All Male A Cappella Ensemble featuring Choral Music of the Middle Ages and Renaissance

ADULT CLASSES

Oil Painting Workshop: From Fur to Feathers – Painting Animals in the Studio
Instructor: Julia Rogers
2 days: December 2 and 3 Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m.–3 p.m.
Cost: $160 Members, $194 Non-members
This year’s Waterfowl Festival Featured Artist, Julia Rogers, will show different ways to use animal reference to create exciting paintings through lecture and demonstration.

FAMILY PROGRAMS

Winter Family Art Day
Family Ornament Day
Instructor: Museum Staff
Saturday, December 16, 10 a.m. –1 p.m.
FREE

For additional information, visit academyartmuseum.org or call the Museum at 410-822-2787.