Shore Leadership Meets in Dorchester County for Agriculture Session

The 2017 Shore Leadership Class traveled to Dorchester County to hear from 2007 alumni, Kelly Jackson owner and operator of Emily’s Produce who hosted the group for a farm to table luncheon where she spoke to the class about the valuable leadership skills she uses every day managing her family’s agri-tourism business.  The class also heard from Rachel Widmaier, 4-H council and vice president of the Trailblazers 4-H Club who shared her journey in 4-H and the leadership skills she is developing through her service.

2017 Shore Leadership Class Visits Emily’s Produce

The leadership focus for the day was Leading Change.  Leadership Facilitator, Carol Graser of the Annapolis Learning Center, who led the class through several exercises and discussions on leading change in your business or organization. “In leading change, I need to be less focused on problem-solving issues and more on the stories people bring with them and the emotions involved,” said a member of the current class.

Later that day the class went to Layton’s Chance Winery where they heard from 1999 alumni, Michael Thielke, Executive Director of the Eastern Shore Entrepreneurship Center.  Michael talked to the class about his role at the Center and explained his view point of agriculture and seafood looking through a lens of innovation and technology with a focus on farm, fish and food.

The day ended with a panel discussion about the challenges of farming and agriculture led by Emily Zobel, Maryland Extension Agriculture Educator.  Afterwards, Mr. Joe Layton and Mr. William Layton talked about their Lazy Day Farm and the Layton’s Chance Winery.  Lazy Day Farm was inducted into the Maryland Agriculture Hall of Fame in 2011.

For more information on Shore Leadership or to apply to join the class of 2018, go to www.shoreleadership.org or contact info@shoreleadership.org.

Shore United Bank Celebrated Opening of New Loan Production Office

Ribbon cutting ceremony for the Shore United Bank Loan Production Office in Ocean City, MD.

Shore United Bank, a member of Shore Bancshares community of companies, celebrated the opening of their new Loan Production Office in Ocean City, Maryland, with the assistance of the Greater Ocean City Chamber of Commerce during their ribbon cutting ceremony on September 7, 2017. They are now open to serve the Ocean City business community and its surrounding area.

“We are excited to expand our presence and lending capabilities to the lower Delmarva Peninsula market”, said W. Thomas Mears, Market Executive of Shore United Bank. “We are pleased to offer small business lending and deposit solutions for the Ocean City business community. We have an experienced and professional staff to help our clients achieve their personal and business financial goals”.

For more information about Shore United Bank visit www.shoreunitedbank.com

Governor Hogan Names Rolle to Talbot County Board of License Commissioners

Maryland Governor Laurence J. Hogan recently named St. Michaels resident William C. Rolle, Jr. (Bill) to the Talbot County Board of License Commissioners. The appointment is to fill a vacancy created, in the six-year term, by the recent death of Commissioner Gretchen Panuzio.

Rolle has been active in the Talbot County community, recently finishing a six-year term on the Talbot Hospice Board, where he served on the executive committee and chaired the communications and development committees. He continues to serve on the communications committee.

Rolle also serves on the Easton Airport Board, The Londonderry on the Tred Avon Board, the Talbot SPY Advisory Board and the Institute for Religion, Politics & Culture at Washington College.

He understands the small business environment, having worked as a marketing communications consultant for 50 years in the Washington Metropolitan area. He founded and managed his own communications firm there for 20 years, prior to selling it to a major New York advertising firm to manage its Washington office.

He has a BS degree from Georgetown University and a MA Degree from American University. He taught Branding, as an Adjunct Professor, at Georgetown University and Advertising and Marketing at Washington College.

Rolle and his wife Carol have lived in St. Michaels for 15-years, moving there after living in Bethesda, Maryland, for more than 50 years. They celebrated 60 years of marriage in February this year. They have four children, one daughter and three sons, ten grandchildren and one great grandson.

Junior Achievement of the Eastern Shore Announces its 2018 Talbot Board of Directors

Junior Achievement of the Eastern Shore (JAES) is pleased to announce its 2018 Talbot County Board of Directors. This panel of dedicated, local professionals are committed to carrying on Junior Achievements’ mission of providing financial literacy, entrepreneurship, and work readiness education to Talbot County students.

The JA of Talbot County board of directors is chaired by Laura Heikes of Shore United Bank, and includes:

Teri Overington, CBIZ; Dr. Kelly Griffith, Talbot County Public Schools; Talli Oxnam, Wye Financial & Trust; The Honorable Megan Cook, Easton Town Council; Pamela Clay, Talbot County Public Schools; Sandra Hale, Merrill Lynch; Renee Stephens, Delmarva Power; Gregory Frankos, Pioneer Financial Services; Ron McDonald, Community Leader; George Koste, Maryland Capital Enterprises; Devon Hainey, SunTrust Bank; Len Foxwell; Comptroller of Maryland; Jim Malena, Morgan Stanley.

Photo: (L-R) The Junior Achievement of the Eastern Shore 2018 Board of Directors: Jayme Hayes, President; Teri Overington, CBIZ; Dr. Kelly Griffith, Talbot County Public Schools; Laura Heikes, Shore United Bank; Talli Oxnam, Wye Financial & Trust; The Honorable Megan Cook, Easton Town Council; Pamela Clay, Talbot County Public Schools; Sandra Hale, Merrill Lynch; Renee Stephens, Delmarva Power; Gregory Frankos, Pioneer Financial Services. (Not pictured- George Koste, Maryland Capital Enterprises; Devon Hainey, SunTrust Bank; Ron McDonald, Community Leader; Len Foxwell; Comptroller of Maryland; Jim Malena, Morgan Stanley).

Junior Achievement (JA), is a national organization dedicated to educating students about managing money, the world of work, and what it means to build a business. JA has been active in Talbot County since 2011 and has been growing steadily. In the 2017 fiscal year the organization reached 762 students. For the 2018 school year, the Talbot board—along with Salisbury-based Junior Achievement president, Jayme Hayes, and her staff—have planned to provide JA programming to all 3rd, 4th, and 8th grade classrooms in Talbot County, as well as expanding the program, JA Finance Park® through Talbot County junior high school classrooms. The JA Finance Park program is composed of thirteen required, teacher-taught, in-class lessons. It culminates in a hands-on, virtual simulation in which students immerse themselves in a reality-based decision-making process that addresses aspects of individual and family budgeting—including housing, transportation, food, utilities, health care, investments, philanthropy, and banking. The computer-simulated activities, which are housed in virtual “storefronts” sponsored by local businesses, are designed to allow students the opportunity to utilize the skills they have learned throughout their JA lessons and to understand the basic steps of maintaining a realistic personal budget.

“We are very excited to have such a strong board to continue the success and growth of Junior Achievement in Talbot County,” says Heikes. “The passion each of our members have for the JA mission makes them invaluable ambassadors in the community, as well as dedicated volunteers in the classroom.”

In addition to providing oversight and support to JA’s programming in Talbot County, the Talbot Board also plans and participates in networking and fundraising events on behalf of the organization, including the FAs for JA luncheon and the Financial Literacy Summit.

Junior Achievement of the Eastern Shore is a 501c3 nonprofit organization that provides financial literacy, work readiness and entrepreneurship education to K-12 students throughout public and private school classrooms in six counties across Maryland’s Eastern Shore. With the help of respected local volunteers, Junior Achievement delivers to young people in all communities the knowledge and skills they need to own their economic success, plan for their future, and make smart academic and economic choices. Through its hands-on, age-appropriate programs Junior Achievement inspires our youth to live within their means, prepare for the world of work, and understand the free enterprise system. In its 2017 fiscal year, Junior Achievement reached over 7,000 students across the Shore. To learn more about Junior Achievement, or to volunteer or donate, log on to www.easternshoreja.org, or email information@easternshoreja.org.

Labor Day Cheat Sheet: The History behind the Holiday

One of our Spies was able to locate this recent online interview with Linda Stinson, a former U.S. Department of Labor’s historian, provided us with some answers about the history of Labor Day.

Q: What’s the history of Labor Day? How did it all begin?

A: The Labor Day holiday is interesting because it evolved over a period of years. In 19th century America, there was already a tradition of having parades, picnics and various other celebrations in support of labor issues, such as shorter hours or to rally strikers. But most historians emphasize one specific event in the development of today’s modern Labor Day. That pivotal event was the parade of unions and a massive picnic that took place in New York City on Sept. 5, 1882.

At that time, the labor movement was growing stronger. Many of the unions in New York prospered by joining together into one Central Labor Union made up of members from many local unions. On May 14, 1882, a proposal was made at the Central Labor Union meeting that all workers should join together for a “monster labor festival” in early September. A committee of five people was appointed to find a park for the celebration. They chose Wendel’s Elm Park at 92nd Street and 9th Avenue, the largest park in New York City at that time; the date was set for Tuesday, September 5. By June, they had sold 20,000 tickets with the proceeds going to each local union selling them. In August, the Central Labor Union passed a resolution “that the 5th of September be proclaimed a general holiday for the workingmen in this city.”

At first they were afraid that the celebration was going to be a failure. Many of the workers in the parade had to lose a day’s pay in order to participate. When the parade began only a handful of workers were in it, while hundreds of people stood on the sidewalk jeering at them. But then slowly they came – 200 workers and a band from the Jewelers’ Union showed up and joined the parade. Then came a group of bricklayers with another band. By the time they reached the park, it was estimated that there were 10,000 marchers in the parade in support of workers.

The park was decorated with flags of many nations. Everyone picnicked, drank beer and listened to speeches from the union leadership. In the evening, even more people came to the park to watch fireworks and dance. The newspapers of the day declared it a huge success and “a day of the people.”

After that major event in New York City, other localities began to pick up the idea for a fall festival of parades and picnics celebrating workers.

Q: Can you clear up some confusion: who is the father of Labor Day?

A: When studying the history of Labor Day, two names stand out, and the funny thing is that they sound just alike. One is Peter J. McGuire, a leading official in the American Federation of Labor and organizer of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners. The other is Matthew Maguire, a machinist from the Knights of Labor. The problem with declaring a single “founder” of Labor Day is that, at the time, no one realized that a new national holiday was being born. It was only after the fact that people tried to pinpoint a single founding father.

Seven years after that first New York Labor Day parade, the union journal for the United Brotherhood of Carpenters published an article claiming that their union brother, McGuire, made the original proposal to have the Labor Day event in New York and called for one day a year to be set aside as Labor Day. This article was reprinted yearly, and it became the common assumption that these were the facts.

However, in 1967, a retired machinist from Maguire’s union stepped up and claimed that his union brother was, in fact, the true originator of the movement for a national Labor Day. He pointed to an old newspaper article written nine years after the New York Labor Day parade titled “Labor Day: Its History and Development in the Land.” This article claimed that the first Secretary of the Central Labor Union, Maguire, was the one who arranged the parade. This claim was supported six years later when the grand marshal of the New York parade of 1882 himself reminisced about how Maguire from the Knights of Labor had first suggested that the Central Labor Union call upon the unions of New York City to join together in a labor parade.

So the historical conundrum seems to hinge on the fact that the two names sound alike and were probably mixed up in the common consciousness. Toss in the years of bitter rivalry between the American Federation of Labor and the Knights of Labor and, of course, you’re going to have multiple heroes emerging in the legend of Labor Day.

I don’t really know if there is only one true parent of Labor Day. But when former Secretary of Labor W. Willard Wirtz spoke at the convention of the International Association of Machinists in 1968, he said: “My decision…is that there is no question as to who is the father of Labor Day in this country. Officially, as of this moment, insofar as the Department of Labor is concerned, it is Matt Maguire, machinist!” So in the question of McGuire versus Maguire, I don’t really know. But my money backs Bill Wirtz every time!

Q: When did it become a national holiday and why?

A: Labor Day as a national, legal holiday had an interesting evolution. The legalized celebration of Labor Day began as individual state celebrations. In 1887, New York, New Jersey and Colorado were among the first states to approve state legal holidays. Then other states joined in to create their own state Labor Days. Finally, in response to a groundswell of support for a national holiday celebrating the nation’s workers, Sen. James Henderson Kyle of South Dakota introduced S. 730 to the 53rd Congress to make Labor Day a legal holiday on the first Monday of September each year. It was approved on June 28, 1894.

Mid-Shore Arts: The Art of Repainting History with Laura Era

Precisely 202 years ago today, Anna Ella Carroll, was born on the Eastern Shore. This event is of particular note to history scholars and even some hometown fans in Dorchester County since it reminds them once again how Anna’s life and extraordinary contributions in winning the Civil War for the Union continue has been lost in the history of the country’s greatest conflict.

As Time Magazine noted last year,  Abraham Lincoln “was so enthusiastic about her writing that he secured government funding for a 50,000-run printing of one of her most influential pamphlets and invited her to the White House for a confidential interview. He was impressed and enlisted her as an unofficial adviser.”

And while there is some historical debate on how much she contributed to the success of individual battles, including the famous Tennessee River Campaign, the evidence was clear enough to some Dorchester County natives to enlist Eastern Shore painter Laura Era to repaint Francis Bicknell Carpenter’s iconic “Lincoln Cabinet” to allow Anna Ella to take her proper seat at the table.

The Spy talked to Laura this week about the project and her hopes to find the appropriate home for this dramatic, and some would say a far more accurate, profile of Lincoln and his advisors.

This video is approximately two minutes in length. For more information about Laura Era’s work please go here

Maryland 3.0: TEDCO’s Startup Help on the Shore with Bill Bernard

For almost twenty years, the Maryland Technology Development Corporation, otherwise known as TEDCO, has been the state’s s lead source for business assistance and seed funding for the development of startup companies.

And during their nineteen years of existence, TEDCO’s track record has been impressive. Hundreds of entrepreneurs have been helped in taking their products to market through mentoring, funding and networking.  That has led to over $110 million in investment dollars and over 350 and research programs funded since 1998.

But what does that mean for the Eastern Shore?

We asked that question to Bill Bernard, TEDCO’s new representative for the Eastern Shore, to get a better idea of how TEDCO works. Bill’s response was to give the example of a very young entrepreneur with a great business idea but who needed help getting that product to market.

Bill also cites his work with hotDesks, a program started by the Eastern Shore Entrepreneurship Center, to provide the tools (like 3D printers) and business consultation support through its Revolution Labs program.

It doesn’t hurt that Bill comes to this new position after a long history of entrepreneurship after a tour of duty in the Peace Corps and a career in marine biology with the Smithsonian Institution. His businesses have included an aquaculture company that operated in the Dominican Republic, and more recently, founding 3Di’s Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Division.

This video is approximately two minutes in length. For more information about TEDCO please go here

Threatre Review: Wacky Neil Simon Classic ‘The Odd Couple’ at TAP

Neil Simon’s “The Odd Couple,” produced by Tred Avon Players (TAP) and currently playing at Oxford Community Center, may be one of the most successful of Simon’s plays – and considering his long and fruitful career, that’s saying a lot.

The basic concept is simple – two friends who are very different and the conflicts that occur when they become roommates.  One is fastidious, the other a carefree slob. But how many Broadway plays of any era have spawned not only a hit movie but three TV sitcoms – plus various other spin-offs including an animated cartoon and a TV sitcom version (by Simon himself!)

Simon’s play, which premiered in 1965, features mismatched roommates Felix Ungar and Oscar Madison – the one an uptight “neat freak,” the other an easy-going slob.

The original production starred Walter Matthau as Oscar and Art Carney as Felix. The play took home four Tony Awards: Best Actor (Matthau), Best Author (Simon), Best Director (Mike Nichols) and Best Scenic Design (Oliver Smith). Matthau reprised his role in the 1968 film, with Jack Lemmon taking the role of Felix. And in the long-running TV series (1970-75), Matthau was replaced by Jack Klugman and Tony Randall played Felix. For some unknown reason, the TV series changed the spelling of Felix’s name from “Ungar” to “Unger.”  At TAP, they stick to the original.

In this female version, the fastidious roommate was played by Sally Struthers of “All in the Family” fame where she played Gloria, the ditzy daughter of Archie and Edith Bunker and “Meathead’s” wife.  Rita Moreno, who is well-known for her role in “West Side Story” played the messy roommate.  Moreno is one of only twelve performers who have won an Oscar, an Emmy, a Grammy, and a Tony.  This is definitely a story concept with characters that have drawn major talents over the decades.

The plot revolves around the personality clash between the two roommates – Oscar’s life, like his apartment, is a shambles, with unpaid bills, broken appliances, and a failed marriage, but he takes it all in stride, although he gets a bit misty eyed when his five-year-old son calls him on the phone. Meanwhile, his fellow journalist Felix is a hypochondriac who fusses over every detail of his life.  Everything must be  just so! Felix upbraids himself – and everyone around him – when things are not up to his impossible standards.  Every glass must have a coaster. But he’s a terrific cook!  The situation is ideal for comedy – in fact, it’s been used or adapted many times, including in the current TV hit, “The Big Bang Theory.”

Best friends, Oscar and Felix, have at it!    

The play opens at the Friday night poker game in Oscar’s apartment in New York City, sometime in the early 1960s. Four of the six regulars are at the table. The interplay between the characters and several comic bits – the soggy potato chips and “green” sandwiches Oscar brings the other players, due to a broken refrigerator – make it clear that Oscar is a complete slob and living on the edge of financial disaster.  As the evening goes on, it becomes evident that one of the regular players, Felix, is missing – and then they find out that Felix and his wife are getting separated.  Now they’re really worried.

The weekly poker game

But then Felix shows up, quite late, and everyone feigns indifference as he wanders about the room, clearly at his wits’ end. Oscar offers him a bed for the night, and Felix accepts – and after the other players leave, he offers him a place to stay. The basic premise of the play is now set up – in effect lighting the fuse for an explosion the audience senses is bound to happen. But, of course, it would spoil the fun to give much more away.

Cast and crew of “The Odd Couple”

The Tred Avon Players’ production, directed by Ed Langrell, assembles a reliable cast of regulars from local theater productions. Click on link for a Spy interview with the two lead actors, Bill Gross as Oscar and Bob Chauncey as Felix.

Bill Gross takes the role of Oscar,  Loud and physical, he is convincing as a macho ‘60s sportswriter. He does a good job of portraying the character’s growing annoyance with his fastidious roommate, despite his carefree attitude toward most of the rest of his daily life.

Oscar, Vinnie, and Murray the cop listen at the bathroom door, ready to bust in in case Felix tries to “harm himself.”  

Bob Chauncey projects a nice nervous energy as Felix, capturing the suggestions of femininity as the character cooks, cleans, and performs the other duties of Oscar’s missing wife – and reveals an emotional softness that must have seemed far stranger in 1964 than it does now. He is a snappy dresser and his hair looks perfectly sculpted. Chauncey is hilarious when he loudly attempts to clear his sinuses,

While Felix and Oscar get star billing, the rest of the ensemble plays an important part in the play. The four poker buddies – all recognizable New York character types – are very well cast.

Patrick Fee does a fine job as Murray, the street-wise cop with a heart of gold. His mobile face and physical presence are just right for the character. A solid job by one of the Shore’s more versatile character actors.  Most recently, he played Bottom the Weaver in Shore Shakespeare’s production of “Midsummer’s Night’s Dream.”

Felix makes sure that each poker player has a napkin and a coaster – and uses them!

Roy, Oscar’s accountant, is played by Paul Briggs who deftly shows his character’s exasperation and concern about Oscar’s irresponsible finances. Briggs holds his nose and drops the stinky garbage out the window.  But he keeps his feelings  in check when Felix appears, becoming reasonable and pragmatic when it is needed, just like an accountant.

The cynical Speed is played by Brian McGunigle, who is now completing  an impressive run of five roles in a row in plays varying from Shakespeare’s “MacBeth” to Tred Avon’s “A Man of No Importance.” His character’s feigned indifference is well conveyed. But of course, Speed really does have compassion for Felix and McGunigle makes these two seemingly opposite emotions believable.

Zach Schlag is cast as mild-mannered Vinnie, whose henpecked home life is a contrast to the broken marriages of the two main characters. The character’s pliability is the source of several entertaining bits, providing great physical comedy as Vinnie slips and falls while frantically racing around the room to help save Felix.  Although he doesn’t have as many lines as some others, his expressions can be hilarious as he reacts to the other characters.

Felix and the two sisters have a good cry. He’s such a sensitive man!

Lisa Roth and Anna Kusinitz-Dietz play the Pigeon sisters, Gwendolyn and Cecily.  The sisters, a divorcee and a widow,  are originally from England and now live in a neighboring apartment.  They have taken quite a shine to the roommates. Their interactions with Felix and Oscar are a fine bit of Neil Simon comedy, well acted by the sisters as they flirt mischievously or cry copiously.  Their giggles and glances are infectious and the audience loved them. On Thursday night when we were there, the audience broke into spontaneous applause as the sisters left the stage.  It was not the end of the scene.

The set, consisting entirely of Oscar’s living room, is worth walking up for a closer look at intermission or after the play closes – details such as an old manual typewriter and a beat-up baseball glove are letter-perfect. The subtle changes in the room as Felix’s “neatnik” influence begins to be seen are nicely done, as well. The costumes are also right on – especially the Pigeon sisters’ early-‘60s colorful dresses with bright, shiny pocketbooks and knee-high boots, Oscar’s #7 Yankees jersey and Speed’s Hawaiian shirts. The soundtrack – designed by Fee – has a nice selection of period-perfect music. A pleasure to see the little touches so well taken care of.

The 50-plus years since the play was written are evident in many details of the plot and dialogue. For example, it’s no longer that unusual for a man to be a good cook – as Felix is. The sums of money mentioned – 34 cents for a pack of cigarettes, for example — are vivid reminders of what inflation has done, while the characters’ concern over the cost of a long-distance phone call is a historical curiosity in today’s era of unlimited cell phone plans.

And hints – quite humorous hints! – that the relationship between Felix and Oscar echoes their failed marriages, probably seemed edgy if not outright taboo in the early ‘60s.  The uptight culture associated with the 1950s lingered into the early ’60s. Hippies hadn’t happened yet and the sexual revolution was still on the horizon. Simon was exploring new territory. He used comedy to explore relationships and situations that would raise few eyebrows today but were uncomfortable for most people at the time. Divorce, separation, alimony, all these were looked upon very differently then than now. Those who lived through those times will find the contrast from today both interesting and amusing; younger audiences may find it an entertaining history lesson. But this is all subtext, the play is a comedy about relationships and surviving breakups, whether it be with spouses or friends. It asks whether people can change and grow. And it ends with hope and a laugh.

There were plenty of laughs in the large audience for Thursday’s performance, which director Langrell described as a “pre-opening” opening. If you’re in the mood for a classic comedy, with  nostalgia for a different time, it’s well worth the trip to Oxford Community Center, 200 Oxford Road. It’s about an hour from Chestertown or 15 minutes from Easton. The play runs just over two hours.  Remember it starts at 7:30 not 8 p.m.!

“The Odd Couple” is playing through August 20. Shows on Thursday, Friday and Saturday are at 7:30 p.m.; Sunday matinees are at 2 p.m. Admission is $20 for adults, $10 for students. Call 410-226-0061 for reservations – which are strongly recommended, judging by the sizable audience Thursday.  This Sunday’s matinee, we are told, is practically sold out already!

Photos in this article are courtesy of Randy Bachand. Thank you, Randy!

Check back – we’ll be posting more photos.

Felix straightens a picture. It was just a tiny bit off-kilter. And it was driving him crazy!

She likes me!

L-R Standing: Speed, (Hawaiian shirt), Murray, Vinnie, Briggs, Oscar,  Seated – Felix

Murray, Speed, and Oscar

Vinnie tries to sweet-talk Felix into some sense.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hanna, Walpole Hired at Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum

Joe-Ann Hanna and Karen Walpole, both of Easton, have recently joined the staff of the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Md.

Hanna has been hired as a Staff Accountant and Guest Services System Manager, making her responsible for financials needs across CBMM’s departments and primary oversight of the Guest Services System (GSS) used for admissions, store inventory management and sales, group tour processing, advance ticket sales, education and marina reservation system linkages, store gift cards, and linkage to online store processing.

From Utica, Mich., Hanna moved to the Eastern Shore in 2001. She has attended both Howard Community College, with a focus in applications programming, and Chesapeake College, with a focus in accounting.

Joe-Ann Hanna (left) and Karen Walpole.

Hanna brings with her vast work experience. Her first job after moving to Maryland was with the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System in Washington D.C., and her most recent position before coming to CBMM was as the office manager for Rathell Farm Equipment.

She has also volunteered extensively at local soup kitchens and with her church, both serving as its bookkeeper and participating in a mission trip.

Walpole is joining the CBMM team as the Administrative Assistant for the Charity Boat Donation Program. CBMM’s Charity Boat Donation Program accepts and sells all manner of craft year-round to support the non-profit’s education, curatorial, and boatbuilding programs.

“Working around boats and the water is a dream come true,” Walpole said of joining CBMM.

Walpole has previously worked at The Star Democrat, sold promotional products, owned her own marketing company, and been a marketing administrator at a yacht brokerage. Originally from Baldwin, N.Y., she earned a Bachelor of Science in journalism, with a concentration in advertising, from the University of Maryland.

After falling in love with the region during college, she decided to stay in Maryland, and has volunteered with Phillips Wharf Environmental Center, Unitarian Universalist Fellowship at Easton, Benedictine School, Integrace Bayleigh Chase and at CBMM, singing carols at the annual Christmas event.

Carolyn D. Spicher Celebrates 25 Years with Shore United Bank

Shore United Bank is proud to recognize Carolyn Spicher for 25 years of dedicated service.  Ms. Spicher joined Shore United Bank, a member of Shore Bancshares community of companies, in 1992 and currently serves as Commercial Banking Officer for Caroline County. “We appreciate and celebrate her 25 years of experience, professionalism and contribution to the company and our community” says Pat Bilbrough, President and CEO.

Before coming to Shore United Bank (formerly CNB), Carolyn gained 28 years of banking experience with the former Denton National Bank and with First National Bank of Maryland.  Ms. Spicher continued her education at Chesapeake College where she took several accounting and finance classes to complete the Robert Morris Associates Credit Course Program. 

Ms. Spicher has served on many boards over the years such as Shore Gourmet, the Town of Denton Loan Committee, and the Caroline County Historical Society, Inc.  Ms. Spicher is an active member of Mid Shore Regional Council, Caroline County Farm Bureau and Caroline County Chamber of Commerce. She is also a past chairman for the Caroline County Farm Bureau Women Leadership. Carolyn also supports multiple fundraising events for local charities.

Ms. Spicher resides on a farm near Denton, Maryland with her husband, Wayne.