Board of Education Approves Calendar Changes

The Talbot County Board of Education held a special meeting this evening to approve changes to the 2017/2018 calendar.  As of January 17, 2018, the school system had used all four inclement weather days built into the calendar, as schools were closed on January 4, 5, 8, and 9. “It is extremely rare for TCPS to use all planned inclement weather days in the first semester of the school year, as historically most weather-related closings have occurred in February,” said Dr. Helga Einhorn, Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and Instruction.

The approved 2017-2018 calendar reflects the final day for students as June 13, the last tenured teacher day on June 18, and the last day for first year teachers on June 21.  This includes four snow days built in as required by Section 7-103 of the Education Article of the Annotated Code of Maryland.  With these four days already used, and in an effort to be proactive, the Board approved a conditional waiver request to be submitted to the Maryland State Board of Education which would allow schools to be open on Presidents’ Day, February 19, 2018.  The State Board of Education will make the final decision as to whether or not TCPS could use this day for school if needed at their January 30, 2018 meeting.  Schools would only open on Presidents’ Day if additional school closings are required prior to February 16.

In a further effort to ensure the ability to meet the requirements of COMAR, the Board approved amending the 2017-2018 approved calendar to change January 26 (Transition Day) from a day off for students and a work day for teachers to an early dismissal day for students.  This change will not require State Board of Education approval, so families should plan accordingly. “This would allow for an additional day and still allow teachers the required negotiated agreement time to complete grades,” explained Dr. Einhorn. “We are grateful for the flexibility and support of our students, staff and the community as we work through this challenging situation.”

The Gunston School Launches Chesapeake Watershed Semester Program

Last week, Gunston’s Board of Trustees formally approved the launch of a new, ambitious, and important educational endeavor: the Chesapeake Watershed Semester. This fully-accredited, semester-long program for high school juniors and seniors will welcome eight to twelve Gunston students in its inaugural pilot year, and will seek to welcome students from around the region and beyond in future years. Utilizing the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed as the foundation for an immersive, rigorous, and interdisciplinary curriculum, and with a strong focus on the domains of environmental science, public policy, and sustainability, the Chesapeake Watershed Semester (CWS) is the only secondary school program of its kind. The inaugural semester will commence this August.

More than two years in the planning, and borrowing from Gunston’s 20-plus years of innovative Chesapeake Bay Studies programming, CWS will offer students extraordinary learning and life experiences. Within the intensive fifteen-week program, students spend nearly a third of their time on various leadership expeditions and field experiences, ranging from a trip to the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, to seminars with public policy leaders in Annapolis and Washington, to an extended tour of the energy-producing regions of Pennsylvania, to a multi-day stay on the ecologically fragile Tangier Island, where the impacts of sea level rise can be observed first-hand.  Meanwhile, rigorous classroom, lab, and research project work will deepen each student’s academic foundation, leading to a capstone action project to be publicly presented at the end of the program. We expect that each cohort of CWS students will emerge as reflective and confident scholars and leaders who can support regional and global environmental sustainability through their understanding of scientific, social, cultural, and political systems.

CWS will be directed by Ms. Emily Beck, Gunston’s current Director of Sustainability and Bay Studies, as well as a Biology and Environmental Science teacher. Under Beck’s leadership the program has engaged a diverse group of formal institutional partners, including the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, Sultana Education Foundation, The University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science’s Horn Point Lab, Washington College’s Center for the Environment and Society, Echo Hill Outdoor School, and the Harry Hughes Center for AgroEcology, among others.  To further support the program, CWS has also established an advisory board that includes key community members and a diversity of Chesapeake watershed subject experts, including several members of Gunston’s Board of Trustees and parent community.  Curriculum development retreats have already been held, and the formal educational program is being developed by an innovative group of Gunston faculty and leadership team members.

As Gunston’s Headmaster John Lewis commented, “Without question, there is tremendous urgency for educational programs like the Chesapeake Watershed Semester, and it is designed to prepare students to meet the complex challenges of our era.” Details about the CWS mission, philosophy, and program, as well as admissions information, is comprehensively articulated on the program’s website: www.chesapeakebaywatershedsemester.org

The Gunston School, a co-ed independent college preparatory school, offers an intellectually rigorous, highly personalized, and nurturing college preparatory educational experience. Valuing a healthy balance between mind and body, a strong sense of community, the creative process, and our connection to the Chesapeake Bay, Gunston strives to educate ethically and environmentally minded scholars, citizens, and leaders for our globalized society. To learn more about Gunston visit gunston.org, email dhenry@gunston.org, or call 410.758.0620 ext. 6.

The Academy for Lifelong Learning Launching Winter/Spring Semester Courses

The Winter/Spring “Preview Party” will be held in Maritime Museum’s Van Lennep Auditorium on Thursday, January 25th 4-6pm.  Bring a neighbor, join us for hors d’oeuvres, wine, and beer.  Meet course leaders to learn about winter/spring courses.

The Academy for Lifelong Learning (A-L-L) at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum (CBMM) is launching 32 Winter/Spring Semester courses with offerings ranging from “Exploring Short Fiction,” to “Talbot County’s Best Practices for Spring Gardens,” to “Bordering on Insanity for Maryland:  Reading History Between the Lines.” Two cooking classes will be conducted by local (and charismatic) instructors.

A-L-L and the Talbot County School District are premiering their partnership with the “Expand Your Horizons” lecture series. Presented in the St. Michaels High School auditorium, three courses intend to elevate academic/information awareness for a broad demographic: middle/high school students to senior citizens.  Leading this series will be Curtis Foy, MD (“Stoke: A Community-Based Grand Rounds”) and Naval Academy professor Miles Yu (“Chinese Geopolitics: Culture, Commerce, and Security”).  A third course will explore genomic clinical applications.

Participants have three registration options: at the Preview Party, through the A-L-L registrar (Laurel Seeman 410.745.4947), or through A-L-L’s new online catalog &registration portal (http://cbmm.org/learn/adult-programs/academy-for-lifelong-learning/courses/).

We’re on Facebook at:
https://www.facebook.com/Academy-for-Lifelong-Learning-at-CBMM-243750782319212/

Website:
http://cbmm.org/learn/adult-programs/academy-for-lifelong-learning/

Dedicated to exploring ideas, exchanging knowledge, and sharing experiences, the Academy for Lifelong Learning is affiliated with the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum.

Upcoming Programming at the Talbot County Free Library in February

Wala-Neh Labala

Easton Children’s Programs

Drop In STEAM: Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Mathematics
Thursday, February 1, 3:30 – 4:45 p.m. Minecraft, Virtual Reality, Build with LEGOS, and more! For ages 6 and up.

Story Time
Tuesdays, February 6 – March 27, 10:00 a.m.; program repeats at 11:00 a.m. For children 5 and under accompanied by an adult.

Afternoon Chess Club
Tuesdays, February 6 – March 27, 4:30 – 5:30 p.m. Learn and play chess. For ages 6 – 16. Snacks served. To guarantee your spot, please register by calling (410-822-1626) or emailing (lpowell@tcfl.org) Laura Powell.

We Are Makers
Wednesdays, February 7, 21, & 28, 4:00 – 5:00 p.m. Design and create gadgets and gizmos with guided instruction and a fun box full of supplies. For ages 6 and up. Limited space. Pre-registration required.

Young Gardeners Club, sponsored by the Talbot County Garden Club
Friday, February 16, 1:30 – 2:30 p.m. Details to be announced.
For grades 1-4. Pre-registration required.

Read with Latte, a Certified Therapy Dog
Tuesday, February 20, 4:00 p.m. Bring a book or choose a library book and read with Janet Dickey and her dog Latte.

St. Michaels Children’s Programs

Maker Space
Wednesday, February 7, 3:30 p.m. Enjoy STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math) building with Legos, Zoobs, and more! For children 6 and older.

Family Unplugged Games
Thursday, February 8, 3:30 p.m. Bring the whole family to the library for an afternoon of board games and fun educational children’s games. For all ages (children 5 and under need to be accompanied by an adult).

Story Time
Wednesdays, February 14 & 28, 10:30 a.m. For children 5 and under accompanied by an adult.

Bill Peak

Minecraft
Wednesdays, February 14 & 28, 3:30 p.m. Explore Minecraft on the library’s computers. For ages 5 and older.

Family Crafts
Thursday February 15, 3:30 p.m. Book Arts: Fold & Cut Book from a Maryland Map

Easton Teen & Adult Programs

Afternoon Chess Club
Tuesdays, February 6 – March 27, 4:30 – 5:30 p.m. Learn and play chess. For ages 6 – 16. Snacks served. To guarantee your spot, please register by calling (410-822-1626) or emailing (lpowell@tcfl.org) Laura Powell. Program organized and run by Mr. Wala-Neh Labala, a program coordinator for school-based mental health with Eastern Shore Psychological Services, which contracts with Talbot County Public Schools.

Stitching Time
Monday, February 12, 3:00 – 5:00 p.m. Patrons are invited to work on their favorite project with a group. Limited instruction will be available for beginners. Newcomers welcome.

Lunch & Learn: Frederick Douglass’s 200th Birthday
Thursday, February 15, 1:00 p.m. Come learn about Talbot County’s most famous native son and the activities planned throughout the state to celebrate his bicentennial. Sponsored by the Friends of the Library. Bring your lunch. Coffee and dessert will be provided.

The Women in Frederick Douglass’s Life
Thursday, February 15, 6:00 p.m. Panel discussion of the women who supported Frederick Douglass throughout his long life and helped him to achieve all that he did.

Teen Game Board Night
Thursday, February 22, 6:00 – 7:30 p.m. Join us as we play real, live, face-to-face board games! Bring your own or use the library’s: Catan, Ticket to Ride, Chess, and more! For grades 6-12. Light refreshments.

An Afternoon of Films about People Who Inspired Change
Monday, February 26, noon – 7:00 p.m. Films will include Alice’s Ordinary People, a documentary look at an unsung heroine of the Civil Rights Movement.

Easton Book Group Discussion: Swing Time by Zadie Smith
Monday, February 26, 6:30 p.m.

St. Michaels Teen & Adult Programs

Arts & Crafts
Thursday, February 1, 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Free instruction for knitting, beading, needlework and tatting. Bring your coloring books, Zentangle pens or anything else that fuels your passion for being creative. You may also bring a lunch.

Book Discussion: The God of Small Things
Thursday, February 1, 2:30 p.m. Bill Peak hosts a discussion of Arundhati Roy’s Man Booker Prize Winner, The God of Small Things.

Dr. Alisha Knight

Brown Bag: “500 Years of African-American History”
Monday, February 5, noon. Using the magic carpet of original newspapers dating from the 17th through the 21st centuries, Dr. Stephen Goldman transports you through 500 Years of African-American history. Sponsored by the Friends of the Library. Bring your lunch. Coffee and dessert will be provided.

Coloring for Teens & Adults
Monday, February 5, 3:30 p.m. Explore the relaxing process of coloring!

Memoir Writers
Thursdays, February 8 & 22, 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Record and share your memories of life and family with a group of friendly, like-minded people. Participants are invited to bring their lunch.

Bay Hundred Chess
Wednesdays, February 14 & 28, 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. Learn and play the strategic game of chess. Beginners welcome. For all ages.

Putting Them on the Map:
Tracing African American Book History through GIS Technology
Saturday, February 17, 2:00 p.m. Dr. Alisha Knight, Associate Professor of English and American Studies at Washington College, will speak about her work exploring the connection between African American book publishing and geographic technologies.

Note: All library programs are free and open to the public.  Unless otherwise noted below, patrons do not need to pre-register to attend a library program.

Contact: Bill Peak, telephone: 410-822-1626

Katelynn Cherry Earns Multiple Choral Honors

Saint Michaels Middle High School junior Katelynn Cherry has been selected for All-State Chorus and All-Honors National Ensemble, and will be performing in the Honors Performance Series in New York City next month.

Katelynn performed as Soprano 1 with The All-National Honors Ensemble on November 26-28, 2017 at Walt Disney World, having been selected through an audition by the National Association for Music Educators.  As part of this process she was required to have recommendations and to have participated in All State Chorus the past.  She also auditioned and was selected for the Honors Performance Series mixed chorus as Soprano 1, which will take place in New York at Carnegie Hall February 1-5.

On March 11 she will perform with All-State Chorus where she is Soprano 1 with the mixed chorus, and she will sing with the All-Shore Chorus as Soprano 1 in April.  She will also compete in the Solo and Ensemble competition on February 7th at North Dorchester High School.

Katelynn has been studying voice for 9 years, beginning with Gail Aveson in Easton. She has also studied with John Wesley Wright from Salisbury, and taken Master Classes with Badiene Magaziner, Bob Marks and Rachelle Jonck from New York. She spent the summer of 2017 at Boston University Tanglewood Institute studying voice and music at the Young Artists Vocal Program and earned six college credits. She currently studies voice at Peabody Preparatory with Alina Kozinska.

Cherry’s ultimate aspiration in music is to become a professional Classical singer, however she loves all musical genres, including rap, jazz, bluegrass, oldies, and rock & roll. In addition to her school related chorus endeavors, Katelynn performs with Soli Vocal Ensemble from Howard County and often does solo work locally.She also has numerous achievements to her credit aside from her music.  She is finishing her year as Miss Maryland/Miss Delmarva Fire Queen and she is also a Girl Scout and a member of 4-H. She has earned her Diamond Clover award with 4-H and will finish her Gold Award with Girl Scouts this summer.  She is the daughter of David Cherry and Karla Wieland-Cherry and resides in Trappe.

Nominations are Being Accepted for TCPS Teacher and Support Staff of the Year

Talbot County Public Schools is excited to announce that the process to select the 2018 Teacher of the Year and Support Staff of the Year has begun!  Is there a teacher or member of the TCPS support staff who is truly outstanding, has made a significant impact on your family, and/or goes above and beyond in their commitment as a professional?  The Teacher of the Year and Support Staff of the Year programs are a fantastic way to recognize educators who exemplify this year’s theme:  #TCPSUnlimited.

Anyone within the school system or any member of the community may nominate a candidate to apply to be Talbot’s Teacher of the Year or Support Staff of the Year.The nomination forms, process and procedures are available in any school main office, are linked below, or may be found on the TCPS website (www.talbotschools.org).  Nominations for both Teacher of the Year and Support Staff of the Year are due by Friday, February 2nd.

To nominate a deserving teacher for Teacher of the Year, please seek their approval first, then follow the procedures outlined on the on the nomination form and submit it to the nominee’s building principal for signature and final submission.  Support Staff of the Year nominations must be approved by the immediate supervisor as well as the site administrator and submitted to Mrs. Lynne Duncan at the Talbot County Education Center.

Nomination forms for Teacher of the Year and Staff of the Year can be found using this link: http://www.tcps.k12.md.us/index.php/2017-18-news/2018-teacher-support-staff-year

Program Focusing Upon the Integration of Talbot County Public Schools

Integration Through a Child’s Eyes, a program focusing upon the integration of Talbot County’s public schools, will be presented Thursday, January 11, 7-9pm at the Academy Art Museum, 106 South St., Easton.

Brown v. Board of Education ruled in 1954 that “separate but equal no longer had a place in our public education,” and states were ordered to desegregate their schools “with all deliberate speed.”

The Talbot County Board of Education would desegregate our schools one grade at a time, choosing freedom of choice as their method of compliance. Despite a small bomb exploding at the back entrance of the elementary school on South Street, progress would be made.

Moderator Constance Morris Hope, with 35 years of experience promoting understanding among people of diverse backgrounds for the US government and international agencies, and featured speakers JoAnn Asparagus Murray and Charles Hines will guide us through our history. Their presentation will be followed by a panel discussion of shared experiences and how lessons learned might guide us today.

This program is being presented by the Talbot County Democratic Forum, and is free and open to the public.

Easton High “Warrior Chorale” Invited to Finals of Choral Competition

The Easton High School Warrior Chorale has been invited to compete in the finals of the Easton Choral Arts Society High School Choral Competition. The competition began by inviting any public or private high school within an approximate 120-mile radius of Easton and with a minimum of 12 singers to submit two recordings for blind auditions. A panel of judges reviewed each submission, and nine choirs were invited to participate in the finals.  It was somewhat like the first round of The Voice but for choirs instead!

On March 3, 2018, in the EHS Auditorium, the Warrior Chorale will compete against the other finalists for a chance to win a $5,000 in prize. The prize funds will go directly back to the winning choral program and would help offset the cost of purchasing new music, hiring accompanists, and reducing the cost of the end of the year performance trip. Each finalist will perform three selections, from a different major musical time period (Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, etc.). The competition will be adjudicated by a panel of three highly accredited judges and winners will be announced that evening.

The Warrior Chorale, shown here performing at the Talbot Hospice 2017 Festival of Trees. Photo credit: Randy Bachand Photography.

The Warrior Chorale is an auditioned ensemble comprised of Easton High School students in grades 9-12.  The ensemble rehearses daily and performs a wide variety of music from traditional choral music to popular music to musical theatre. Its members are Laurie Alltop, Haley Anderson, Samantha Bonnette, Madison Cordle, Sabrina Davis, Madelyn Hancock, Eleanor Brett Hutchinson, Tah’Jay Jenkins, Matthew Keeler, Sophie McGee, Haley Nestel, Natasha Panduwawala, Michaela Russ, Jonah Sanders, Josiah Sanders, Neil Siegman, Jessica Smith, Noah Thompson, Alison Todd, Eve Van Horn, Richard Seth Wagner, Claire Weedon and Emily Wittman.

Mrs. Andrea Stewart Davis, B.M.E., M.M. directs the EHS Warrior Chorale and is a Theater Arts Instructor at Easton High School. Mrs. Davis made her international performance debut in July, 2017, at Lake Como, Italy, and recently conducted internationally at the Delaware Choral Academy in Aix-en-Provence, France. Her choirs are praised for their musical nuance and their energy and enthusiasm as an ensemble.

Mark your calendar for Saturday, March 3, 2018, and come out to hear the EHS Warrior Chorale bring down the house.  Additionally, the EHS Warrior Chorale and Women’s Choir will present their Winter Concert in the EHS Auditorium, on Tuesday, January, 23, 2018, at 6:30pm. The Warrior Chorale will follow up their performance in the ECAS Choral Competition with their spring concert on Tuesday, March 27, 2018 at 6:30pm. They will conclude the 2017-2018 year with a performance at the Night of the Arts on Thursday, May 10, 2018, in conjunction with the EHS Warrior Band and Fine Art Department.

The Warrior Chorale also wishes to acknowledge Les Lentz of Les Lentz Sound Productions for his dedication to the EHS choral program.

Talbot Goes Purple student club trained on Narcan

Easton High School’s Talbot Goes Purple student club last week received Narcan training from the Talbot County Health Department Prevention Office.

As part of Talbot Goes Purple, Easton and St. Michaels High Schools have clubs comprised of students who have pledged to take a stand against substance abuse. The student-focused clubs help the kids learn they don’t need drugs or alcohol to meet life’s challenges.

The clubs also help students learn about the signs and symptoms of drug use and what to do if a friend needs help. Last week’s Narcan training included information on how to spot the signs of an overdose and what to do, including how to administer rescue breaths and how to put a person into the ‘recovery position.’ Students in the St. Michaels High School Talbot Goes Purple Club also are getting Narcan trained in January.

“Overdose deaths are now the leading cause of death in our youth,” said Talbot County Sheriff Joe Gamble. “We’re doing everything we can to fight this epidemic — training our students empowers them to join the fight against overdose deaths in our communities.”

Commonly sold under the brand name Narcan, Naloxone is a life-saving medication that reverses an opioid overdose yet has no abuse potential. It is easy to use is and is available over-the-counter without a prescription.

This year’s Start Talking Maryland Act mandated that all public schools provide prevention education and stock Narcan; Talbot County Public Schools is the first in the region – possibly the state – to train high school students.

“While we hope our students are never in a situation in which they have to administer Narcan, we are grateful that they are able to be trained on how to do so properly.” said Kirk Howie, Easton High Principal. “We are proud of the students in Our TGP Club for taking such an active role in fighting the opioid epidemic.”

The clubs started in September, after student ambassadors represented Talbot Goes Purple at several events during the summer. Since school started, the students have taken more than 15 school games purple, have hosted several educational speakers and are working on fun contests for the upcoming National ‘Purple Week’ in January.

An initiative from the Talbot County Sheriff’s Office and Tidewater Rotary, in partnership with Talbot County Public Schools, Talbot Goes Purple empowers our youth and our community to ‘Go Purple’ as a sign of taking a stand against substance abuse.

Talbot Goes Purple is based upon THP Project Purple, an initiative of the Herren Project that helps people struggling with drug dependencies. Former NBA player Chris Herren founded both projects after speaking to a high school about his struggles with drug dependency.

Kirsten Moore, community health educator with the Talbot County Health Department Prevention Office, provided the training for the students. Moore and Alexandra Duff, prevention supervisor with the TCHD prevention office, have trained more than 650 people in Talbot County since July.

For more information on Narcan or to get trained, visit www.TalbotsGotHeart.org or call the Talbot County Health Department at 410-819-5600.

More information on Talbot Goes Purple is available at www.talbotgoespurple.org. Find us on Facebook @TalbotGoesPurple or contact us at talbotgoespurple@gmail.com.

Upcoming Programming at the Talbot County Free Library in January

Children’s Programs

Easton

Drop In STEAM: Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Mathematics
Thursday, January 4, 3:30 – 4:45 p.m. Minecraft, Virtual Reality, Build with LEGOS, and more! For ages 6 and up.

Young Gardeners Club, sponsored by the Talbot County Garden Club
Thursday, January 11, 3:45 – 4:45 p.m. Details to be announced.
For grades 1-4. Pre-registration required.

Story Time
Tuesdays, January 16 – March 27, 10:00 a.m.; program repeats at 11:00 a.m. For children 5 and under accompanied by an adult.

Blue Sky Puppet Theatre

Read with Latte, a Certified Therapy Dog
Tuesday, January 16, 4:00 p.m. Bring a book or choose a library book and read with Janet Dickey and her dog Latte.

Puppet Show: Pig Tales
Saturday, January 27, 11:00 a.m. Blue Sky Theatre presents a professional theatre experience that’s fun for the whole family!

We Are Makers
Wednesday, January 31, 4:00 – 5:00 p.m. Design and create gadgets and gizmos with guided instruction and a fun box full of supplies. For ages 6 and up. Limited space. Pre-registration required.

St. Michaels

Maker Space
Wednesday, January 3, 3:30 p.m. Enjoy STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math) building with Legos, Zoobs, and more! For children 6 and older.

STEM Story Time at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum
Wednesday, January 10, 10:30 a.m. Enjoy STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math) story time, and learn about animals in winter at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum. Pre-registration is required for free admission to the museum. Please call the St Michaels Library at 410-745-5877 to pre-register for this event. For ages 5 and under accompanied by an adult.

Minecraft
Wednesdays, January 10 & 24, 3:30 p.m. Explore Minecraft on the library’s computers. For ages 5 and older.

Family Unplugged Games
Thursday, January 11, 3:30 p.m. Bring the whole family to the library for an afternoon of board games and fun educational children’s games. For all ages (children 5 and under need to be accompanied by an adult).

Story Time
Wednesday, January 24, 10:30 a.m. For children 5 and under accompanied by an adult.

Family Crafts
Thursday, January 25, 3:30 p.m. Make marbleized paper (please wear old clothes).

Teen & Adult Programs

Easton

Grow & Eat Sprouts and Microgreens
Saturday, January 6, 11:00 a.m. Just because it’s winter doesn’t mean you can’t grow fresh, healthy food. Gregory Rohman describes how to grow microgreens and sprouts for sandwiches and salads. These tasty, crunchy seedlings are packed with vitamins and can be grown indoors!

Stitching Time
Monday, January 8, 3:00 – 5:00 p.m. Patrons are invited to work on their favorite project with a group. Limited instruction will be available for beginners. Newcomers welcome.

3 Movie Marathon, Titles TBA
Saturday, January 14, 10:00 a.m. – noon, noon – 2:00, & 2:00 – 4:00 p.m.

Library Café
Wednesdays, January 17 – 31, 10 a.m. – noon. The weather outside is frightful, so warm yourself up with some coffee or tea (on the library), browse a magazine, read a book, color, or sit and chat.

Lunch & Learn: HOOPLA
Thursday, January 18, noon. Join Jo Powers, Information Services Librarian, for a tour of one of the library’s most popular electronic resources: HOOPLA. With over 500,000 items available 24/7, HOOPLA offers you movies, television shows, ebooks, audiobooks, and music … all absolutely free from your library! Sponsored by the Friends of the Library. Bring your lunch. Coffee and dessert will be provided.

Easton Book Group Discussion: Title TBD
Monday, January 22, 6:30 p.m.

Teen Game Board Night
Thursday, January 25, 6:00 – 7:30 p.m. Join us as we play real, live, face-to-face board games! Bring your own or use the library’s: Catan, Ticket to Ride, Chess, and more! For grades 6-12. Light refreshments.

Bill Peak

Charades with a Twist: Acting Out at the Library
Friday, January 26, 5:30 – 8:00 p.m. The Friends of the Talbot County Free Library invite you to join them for a fun filled evening of wonderful food, delectable drink, lively entertainment, and scintillating conversation. Come prepared to solve dramatically presented clues that will challenge your literary knowledge of book titles and authors. All proceeds benefit both the Easton and St. Michaels branches of the Talbot County Free Library. Tickets are $50 per person, and sponsorship opportunities are available. For information, or to become an event sponsor, call 410-763-9291 or 443-385-0475. Payments may be sent to FOL, P.O. Box 2045, Easton, MD 21601.

Book Discussion: The God of Small Things
Monday, January 29, 6:30 p.m. Bill Peak hosts a discussion of Arundhati Roy’s Man Booker Prize Winner, The God of Small Things.

St. Michaels

Arts & Crafts
Thursday, January 4, 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Free instruction for knitting, beading, needlework and tatting. Bring your coloring books, Zentangle pens or anything else that fuels your passion for being creative. You may also bring a lunch.

Bay Hundred Chess
Wednesdays, January 10 & 24, 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Learn and play the strategic game of chess. Beginners welcome. For all ages.

Memoir Writers
Thursdays, January 11 & 25, 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Record and share your memories of life and family with a group of friendly, like-minded people. Participants are invited to bring their lunch.

Coloring for Teens & Adults
Monday, January 22, 3:30 p.m. Explore the relaxing process of coloring!

Contact: Bill Peak, telephone: 410-822-1626

(Note: All library programs are free and open to the public. Unless otherwise noted below, patrons do not need to pre-register to attend a library program.)