The Importance of Julia Child’s Kitchen and Mirrors with St. Michaels Architect Pamela Heyne

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St. Michaels architect Pamela Heyne believes her first link to Talbot County was through her friend David Morton, son of Eastern Shore hero Rogers Morton, when they were both at Yale School of Architecture together in the late 1960s. She had fond memories of the area, but it never occurred to her that she and her husband would one day be living on Mount Misery Road. That was until they decided to adopt two girls when they were seven and nine years old.

It has now been over ten years since they made the decision to trade in the urban life of Georgetown for a rural one for the girls teen years. But that has not stopped Pam as both an architect and author.

Even with an extraordinary client list, with the likes of the late Ben Bradlee, Oberlin College, and quite a few closer to home, it is her work in relation to kitchen design and the use of mirrors in residential houses that has lead her to collaborations with Julia Child and making presentations to executives of Saint Gobain, the glass & mirror company founded by Louis XIV.

In her Spy interview, Pam talks about she learned from Julia Child, her bias in kitchen design, not only in terms of design and function, but its impact of family life and what role it plays now in the American home.

This video is approximately five minutes in length

Bistro St. Michaels Wins Oyster Stew Competition

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CBMM_OysterStewWinner2014Bistro St. Michaels Executive Chef David Hayes, center, stands behind his first place oyster stew at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum’s October 25 competition at OysterFest. Standing with Hayes are CBMM volunteers Bridget and Danny Moss. Bistro St. Michaels will receive an award plaque from CBMM in honor of the distinction and the opportunity to serve the winning stew at next year’s OysterFest.

The oyster stew competition was sponsored by the Hambleton Inn Bed & Breakfast of St. Michaels.

Six restaurants competed, with 500 festival-goers taking part in blind taste tests before voting by ballot for their favorite stew. Bistro St. Michaels was served as stew ‘A’ in the tastings, with OysterFest participants voting Theo’s Steaks, Sides & Spirits of St. Michaels (stew ‘C’) as the second place winner, and third place going to Roy’s Kwik Korner of Glen Burnie, (stew ‘B’). Other participants included the High Spot Gastropub of Cambridge (stew ‘D’), The Inn at Perry Cabin by Belmond’s Stars of St. Michaels (stew “E’) and Victory Garden Café of Easton (stew ‘F’). The competition was sponsored by the Hambleton Inn Bed & Breakfast of St. Michaels.

CBMM’s next OysterFest is scheduled for October 31, 2015 in St. Michaels, Md. For more information, visit www.cbmm.org/oysterfest.

The Roadhouse Clams, Swamp Donkey Headline Oct. 25 OysterFest

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The Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum’s October 25 OysterFest features two stages of live music, with The Roadhouse Clams, shown here, playing from the historic Tolchester Beach Bandstand, and the Annapolis-based Swamp Donkey playing from the lower deck of the Steamboat Building. Special to this year’s OysterFest will be songwriter Michael Kelly, who will debut his song, The Boatbuilder, during one of The Roadhouse Clams’ breaks. The song was written about legendary boatbuilder Bronza Parks, who built the skipjack Rosie Parks and dovetail Martha, among many other boats along the Chesapeake Bay. Photo Credit: Michael Driscoll.

OysterFest features two stages of live music, with The Roadhouse Clams, shown here, playing from the historic Tolchester Beach Bandstand, and the Annapolis-based Swamp Donkey playing from the lower deck of the Steamboat Building.

The Chesapeake’s favorite bivalve may be the star of the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum’s October 25 OysterFest, but the music line-up and the return of Fordham Brewing Company’s Rosie Parks Oyster Stout will provide some of this year’s highlights.

Slated to bring a feisty blend of country, roadhouse and “juke joint” music to OysterFest is the Centreville-based group The Roadhouse Clams. The Clams are known to bring the sounds of Steve Earle, The Rolling Stones, John Hiatt, Old 97’s, and the Zac Brown Band to life. They have appeared live with the Avett Brothers, Jonny Lang, Deanna Bogart, Flogging Molly, Gin Blossoms and other nationally known artists. The Clams play at OysterFest from the historic Tolchester Beach Bandstand beginning at 11 a.m. until 4 p.m.

Beginning at 10 a.m., singer-songwriter Michael Kelly will weave melodic guitar and soulful vocals into his performance from the Tolchester Beach Bandstand. Kelly will debut his song, The Boatbuilder, during one of The Roadhouse Clams’ breaks. The song was written about legendary boatbuilder Bronza Parks, who built the museum’s skipjack Rosie Parks and dovetail Martha, among many other boats along the Chesapeake Bay.

In honor of the CBMM’s skipjack Rosie Parks—which was relaunched at OysterFest 2013 after a historic, three year restoration—Fordham Brewing Co.’s Rosie Parks Oyster Stout will be served on tap during this year’s October 25 event. The stout is now available in 12-ounce six packs in regional markets, with Fordham donating proceeds from each sale to CBMM. At the festival, singer-songwriter Michael Kelly will debut The Boatbuilder, a song written about legendary boatbuilder Bronza Parks, who built the museum’s skipjack Rosie Parks and dovetail Martha, among many others along the Chesapeake Bay.

In honor of the CBMM’s skipjack Rosie Parks—which was relaunched at OysterFest 2013 after a historic, three year restoration—Fordham Brewing Co.’s Rosie Parks Oyster Stout will be served on tap during this year’s October 25 event.

Across the boardwalk along Fogg’s Cove, festival-goers can listen to the vocal harmonies and tight transitions of the Annapolis-based group, Swamp Donkey. Noted as a high energy newgrass band with a twist of rock, the group will be playing on the lower decks of the Steamboat Building from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

In honor of the museum’s skipjack Rosie Parks—which was relaunched at OysterFest 2013 after a three year restoration—Fordham Brewing Co.’s Rosie Parks Oyster Stout will be served on tap during the event. The stout is also available in 12-ounce six packs at select locations throughout the Maryland, Delaware, Virginia and Washington D.C. markets, with Fordham donating a portion of each sale’s proceeds to CBMM.

OysterFest admission will be taken at the museum the day of the event, and is $15 for adults, $12 for seniors and students with ID, and $6 for children between the ages of six and 17. Admission is free for CBMM members and children under six. Performances are included in the admission prices, with food, beverages and boat rides available at an additional cost. For safety reasons, festival-goers need to keep dogs at home, as leashed dogs are only permitted on museum grounds during regular operating hours. For more information about OysterFest, visit www.cbmm.org/oysterfest or call 410-745-2916.

Rabbi Hyman and Bishop Johnson to Teach “Ancient Voices, Modern Topics”

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Bishop Joel Marcus Johnson, Scossa owner-chef Giancarlo Tondin, and Rabbi Peter E. Hyman are presenting a savory seminar beginning October 22, entitled “Ancient Voices, Modern Topics.”

That irrepressible trio is at it again! Rabbi Peter E. Hyman, Scossa owner-chef Giancarlo Tondin, and Bishop Joel Marcus Johnson, are offering another savory seminar in the banquet hall of Ristorante Scossa in downtown Easton. The seminar is entitled “Ancient Voices, Modern Topics.” Scholars will dine on Tondin’s culinary delights, while learning from ancient writers with Bishop and Rabbi.

The seminar will be held on four consecutive Wednesdays, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., October 22 and 29, and November 5 and 7. Scholars also will have first dibs for the best seats on an exclusive November 19 motor coach trip to Washington, DC, for a private tour of the Freer Sackler Smithsonian Museum’s exciting new exhibition, “Unearthing Arabia: The Archaeological Adventures of Wendell Phillips.”

This will be Rabbi Hyman and Bishop Johnson’s eleventh academic course, most often in college classrooms and museums, and now four times in Ristorante Scossa. They do not teach religion classes as such, but offer courses in history and literature.

“For this course,” Bishop Johnson said, “we have chosen four modern topics, and have searched the literature to see what the ancients had to say about them. For five thousand years, the topics are surprisingly the same, whether in cuneiform from ancient Sumer and Mesopotamia, or in the Hebrew Scriptures, or the Talmud. The seminar will be full of surprises.”

The four topics are immigration, abortion & euthanasia, capital punishment, and sexual & gender identity issues.

“The bishop and I always admonish our students,” Rabbi Hyman said, “that ‘ancient’ doesn’t mean ‘stupid’ – those writers were very sophisticated thinkers. We like to think we bring out the best in them.”

A few good seats are still available for the seminar. The registration fee of $50 covers the four lectures, and scholars have the right of first refusal to register for the November 19 field trip at a separate cost. The cost of luncheon is separate from the tuition, and generally in the $13 range. To register, call Temple B’nai Israel at 410-822-0553, and ask for Nancy.

Certificates of Continuing Education Units (CEUs) are provided for clergy and other professionals.

Hyman is Rabbi of Temple B’nai Israel, and Johnson is Bishop of the Anglican Diocese of The Chesapeake. They are both longtime theological educators.

 

Food, Herbs and History of the War of 1812 Era

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Katherine Barney Moose

Katherine Barney Moose

Author, lecturer and gourmet cook Katie Barney Moose will be the speaker for the October 16 Brown Bag Lunch at the Easton Branch of the Talbot County Free Library. The program is free and open to the public.

Ms. Moose has developed a very interesting program for the War of 1812, discussing early food, herbs and history leading up to the War. Learn what was consumed during that time period, and how food was provided to the troops.

Ms. Moose is a descendant of the Clagett family of Maryland and old New England whaling families, and a member of the National Society of Colonial Dames of America. She has given lectures and cooking demonstrations on many parts of the world, including the Middle East, North Africa, the Chesapeake Bay region, the Pacific Northwest, French and British herbs, early American and Italian herbs, Latin America, Spices, Greece and Southeast Asia.

Ms. Moose has authored and co-authored many books about the Eastern Shore including Eastern Shore of Maryland: The Guidebook, Chesapeake’s Bounty and Chesapeake’s Bounty II. She is in the process of publishing an international cookbook covering every country around the world. This book will include the history of the cuisine of the countries, the dining etiquette, and recipes contributed by ambassadors, their chefs, and international friends. In addition, Ms. Moose is a consultant on international business and protocol.

This free program begins at noon and will last approximately one hour. Guests are invited to bring their lunch to eat during the program or just come to listen and learn. Coffee and sweets will be provided by the Friends of the Library, who sponsor the Brown Bag Lunch program.

Eastern Shore: The New Wine Country

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Wine Country and Eastern Shore of Maryland are yet to be synonymous phrases.

That could change as new vineyards are established across the Shore from Berlin to Rising Sun—and both new and older vineyards collect prestigious awards along the way.

Of the more than 60 wineries in Maryland—with $30 million annually in sales according to recent studies— 14 of them are part of the developing Chesapeake Wine Trail on the Eastern Shore.

Six wine trails now lace Maryland’s countryside and the Chesapeake Wine Trail on the Eastern Shore is poised to play a significant part in the new Vintage Atlantic Wine Region, along with Delaware, Pennsylvania, and southern New Jersey.

At the September 18 launch party for the new wine region, held at Harvest Ridge Winery in Marydel, Delaware, winery owner Chuck Nunan expressed his enthusiasm saying, “This is a really an exciting time for wine growing on the Eastern Shore. 55 wineries and vineyards are coming together to create tourist destinations points. We’re at the place Napa Valley was in the 60’s, and each of these wineries directly benefits their local communities. One out of 18 jobs in this country is related to tourism.”

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Lotte Bowie and her husband Walter took an early interest in Chesapeake region wineries. Connecting with the wine industry through their Loblolly Productions, a design and marketing firm in Still Pond, Maryland, they have become instrumental with branding and marketing Eastern Shore wineries and vineyards. Their online information portal, www.shorevines.com, showcases the growth and potential of vineyards and wineries on the Eastern Shore and offers detailed articles and in-depth video interviews about how to start and manage a winery.

“There are five wineries within 20 minutes of Chestertown: Crow Vineyard and Winery in Kennedyville, Salisa Winery and Clovelly Vineyards in Chestertown, Cassinelli Winery and Vineyards in Church Hill and Tilmon’s Island Winery in Sudlersville. We want locals to know about this group also because it is becoming an important part of our local economic health,” Bowie says.

Doris Mason, Executive Director of Upper Shore Regional Council, sees the Wine Trail and Chesapeake Wine County concept as a vibrant economic force. The USRC, charged with fostering economic and social development of Cecil, Kent and Queen Anne’s counties, supports the shoreVines initiative

“Not only is there an economic impact through employment, but also there are other arteries that go with supporting vineyards and wineries—restaurants, bed and breakfasts, hotels, even conversations about upcoming distilleries and breweries—that all play into networking and developing a larger tourist industry,” Mason says.

Crow Vineyard and Winery in Kennedyville.

Crow Vineyard and Winery in Kennedyville.

And the wine? People are taking notice.

Wine enthusiasts and judges are giving a hearty thumbs-up and handing out top-flight awards to Shore wineries.

Bordeleau Vineyards, near Salisbury, just won the Shore’s 1st Governor’s Cup Best in Show for their 2008 Cabernet Sauvignon Amarone and many other Eastern Shore wineries  have won accolades as well, including Crow Vineyard and Winery Best in Class for their 2012 Barbera Rosé and gold for their 2012 Vidal Blanc, and Clovelly Vineyard’s silver for their 2013 Rosé and Vidal Blanc.

So much for the “Eastern Shore can’t make quality wine theory.”

“Our wines are phenomenal and the impact on the community is immense. It’s only just begun,” Chuck Nunan said at the Harvest Ridge ceremony for the Vintage Atlantic Wine Region.

In the following video, Lotte Bowie and Doris Mason talk about wineries and vineyards, the growth of the industry on the Eastern Shore, and the bright outlook for the Eastern Shore of Maryland as… Wine Country.

 

 

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Map and Crow Vineyard photo by Lotte Bowie, loblolly.biz

Links:

Vintage Atlantic Wine Region

ShoreVines

Maryland Wine

Chesapeake Wine Country

Meet Easton’s Gluten Free Bakery Girl

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glutenfreebakerygirlTucked inside the very first stall of Easton Market Square on Washington Street you’ll find professional pastry chef, Tricia King. There, in a tidy little kitchen, she creates cookies, muffins, pies, cakes, specialty pastries and more, all with a special twist. They’re completely gluten-free.

“Gluten-free isn’t a fad, it is definitely here to stay” said King, owner of the business Gluten Free Bakery Girl. “My customers are people with celiac disease, but also people with gluten intolerance, or any type of inflammation – Rheumatoid Arthritis, Crohn’s disease, Lyme disease, or many other autoimmune disorders. Even parents of children with autism say that a gluten free diet without sugar or dairy makes a difference.”

What is gluten? It’s simply a protein found in wheat, rye and barley. People with celiac disease can’t digest it and become very ill, and people with gluten intolerance feel achy, tired and sore after eating it. King’s experience was that she’d feel lethargic for days after eating gluten. And in our industrial food system, gluten can be found in the most unlikely places – in sour cream and yogurt, for instance, black olives, and anything labeled “modified food starch.”

Confused? You’re not alone. But it’s becoming easier to access gluten-free products and more information is widely known about the disorders. Tricia King offers consulting services to people who have recently been identified as gluten intolerant. As a personal chef for over ten years, she has the skills and experience to help people modify their kitchens and diets to keep themselves well. She can help anyone pick safe foods, read food labels to identify hidden dangers, and feel good about a gluten-free lifestyle.

Soon her operation will be certified as gluten-free by the FDA – a lengthy process in which all of her handmade flour mixes will be laboratory tested to ensure that there are less than 20 parts per million of gluten. This certification will allow customers to be sure that every single item made in King’s kitchen is completely safe for gluten intolerant eaters.  King also makes paleo items, as well as sugar-free baked goods using coconut palm sugar.

With an expanding wholesale business, Gluten Free Bakery Girl products can now be found in Annapolis and beyond. Locally, you’ll find Tricia King at Easton Market Square from 10:00 am – 6:00 pm W-F, and 8:00 am – 4:00 pm on Saturday, her busiest day of the week. Call ahead 48 hours for special orders, from birthday cakes to breakfast pastries, cookie trays or specialties for holiday parties.

“If people have questions, they should come see me. I’m here for anybody with gluten intolerance” she said. For more information, call (801)792-3700, see her website here, or stop in and visit her at Easton Market Square at 137 N. Harrison St in Easton.

Announcing Talbot County Weekly Foodie Tours

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Hungry for a taste of the Eastern Shore’s finest dining establishments but don’t know where to start? Looking to entertain guests while they visit the Shore? Now you can join a walking food tour and experience Easton and St. Michael’s one taste and sip at a time.

EatingEaston and EatingSt. Michaels was created by local businessman and entrepreneur, Bill Bernard, who fell in love with the idea of blending culture, food, history, and adventure as a way to experience the wonders of the unique towns and communities of the beautiful Eastern Shore of Maryland.

“My wife, Kathy, and I discovered food tours while visiting San Diego a few years ago. Not only is it interesting to learn about history and folklore from locals, it’s a great way to sample some terrific cuisine while having a one-on-one with the various chefs. Our towns and communities are perfect venues for food tours drawing tourists and locals alike.”

Each three hour tour is led by experienced tour guides who are history and food buffs. A minimum of four restaurants along the way will welcome the group and provide a taste and a sip of their signature dishes and drinks. A local culinary specialty store will offer tastings as well.
Lace up your walking shoes and prepare to sample some of the the Eastern Shore’s “Best food on foot.”

For more information visit www.eatingeaston.com or call 410-635-4130

September 25 Brings Oyster Crawl to St. Michaels

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Fordham Brewing Company and the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum are presenting the first St. Michaels Oyster Crawl on Thursday, September 25 for a limited number of participants. The 4-7 pm. event features a “History on the Half Shell” program at CBMM, followed by a walking tour of St. Michaels’ historic district for stout and oyster pairings at four waterfront restaurants.

The two organizations have been partnering together since 2012, when Fordham launched its Rosie Parks Oyster Stout brand, made in honor of the museum’s recently restored oystering skipjack, the Rosie Parks.

Beginning in September, the brewery will be offering the stout in 12-ounce bottles, packaged in six packs, with draft also available in select Maryland, Virginia and Delaware locations. Tours and tastings will also be offered at Fordham’s headquarters in Dover, De. A portion of the stout’s sales are being donated to the non-profit museum.

Fordham Brewing Company and the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum are presenting a St. Michaels Oyster Crawl on Thursday, September 25 for a limited number of participants. The 4-7 pm. event features a “History on the Half Shell” program at CBMM, followed by a walking tour of St. Michaels’ historic district for stout and oyster pairings at four waterfront restaurants.

Fordham Brewing Company and the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum are presenting a St. Michaels Oyster Crawl on Thursday, September 25 for a limited number of participants. The 4-7 pm. event features a “History on the Half Shell” program at CBMM, followed by a walking tour of St. Michaels’ historic district for stout and oyster pairings at four waterfront restaurants.

The September 25 Oyster Crawl begins at 4 p.m., with participants joining CBMM’s Director of Education Kate Livie for a brief “History on the Half Shell” talk in the museum’s Van Lennep Auditorium. During the program, the museum will offer tastings of local, farm-raised Choptank Sweets, shucked and served by a Chesapeake waterman. To kick off the event, each participant will receive a commemorative tasting glass, as well as a 12-ounce bottle of Rosie Parks Oyster Stout.

From there, participants will take a brief walking tour along the St. Michaels harbor to sample oyster and stout pairings at the waterfront Crab Claw Restaurant, St. Michaels Crab & Steak House, Town Dock Food & Spirits and Foxy’s Harbor Grille.

Oysters will be prepared in a number of ways, including Oysters Rockefeller, Oysters Casino, and raw on the half shell, with participants offered stout samplings and five plated oysters at each location.

“The stout is designed to pair well with oysters,” said Fordham Brewing Company President Jim Lutz. “This year, we’re producing 100 barrels of the one-batch stout, which is brewed with Chesapeake Bay oysters and shells to give it a slight briny taste.”

The skipjack Rosie Parks was built in 1955 by legendary boat builder Bronza Parks for his brother, Captain Orville Parks, and was named for their mother. CBMM purchased the sailing workboat in 1975 from Captain Orville, after 20 years dredging oysters along the Chesapeake Bay. Rosie had a reputation as both the best maintained skipjack in the oyster dredging fleet and as a champion sailor at the annual skipjack races. She is now a floating exhibit and ambassador of the museum, with participation planned for this year’s skipjack races.

The cost for the St. Michaels Oyster Crawl is $65 per person, or $55 for CBMM members, with limited participation and registration needed by Monday, September 22. To register, call CBMM at 410-745-4941. The event is generously sponsored by the participating restaurants, as well as Kelly Distributors of Easton, Md. For more information, visit www.cbmm.org or www.fordhambrewing.com

Chorizos—Maryland Style!

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On Monday, August 4, local families will be able to sample the Eastern Shore take on the Chorizo, a spicy pork sausage originating in Iberia and popular in Latin America.  Easton’s Multicultural Resource Center is announcing that for the second year in a row, Chef Jordan Lloyd and Cottingham Farms are teaming up for an evening featuring healthful eating.  From 6:00 to 7:00 p.m. families will enjoy a cooking demonstration and recipes from the Bartlett Pear Inn’s Chef Jordan and each family will receive free sausage and fresh vegetables.  The Center is located at 109 N. Aurora Street in Easton.

Heritage pork for this healthful menu comes from Black Bottom Farms in Kent County where Kim Wagner raises pork, veal and poultry – all pastured, all of which are favorites at the farmer’s markets in both Easton and on Kent Island.  Wagner, with the generous support of Tom Buckmaster of Easton, was instrumental in the conception of a Family Night based on healthful eating.

Eastern Shore native and executive Chef and owner of the Easton’s Bartlett Pear Inn, Jordan Lloyd, was recently nominated for best chef by the Maryland Restaurant Association

Cleo Braver’s Cottingham Farms, also in Easton, is a grower of certified organic heirloom vegetables and herbs that are available in Bethesda and Easton, Easton Market Square, certain Whole Foods and other niche markets and is on the menu at Eastern Shore, Baltimore, Washington and Annapolis restaurants which feature fresh, local and sustainably produced ingredients.

The Chesapeake Multicultural Center, based in Easton, reaches out to the growing number of non-English speaking residents of the Mid-Shore to help them become successful and engaged members of the community. ChesMRC is the source of information for and about that diverse cultural, ethnic and racial population on the Mid-Shore