Spy House of the Week: Sherwood Serenity

One of my favorite villages in Talbot County is Sherwood, because it embodies a wonderful sense of place due to the group of historic houses that comprise its core.  From The “Wharf House” to the charming bungalows, the village is simply charming. This house caught my eye for its site with its expansive views of the Chesapeake Bay and its evolution from 1890 to the renovation in the 1990’s. Modern touches included the contemporary windows without any muntins and the addition of a “lighthouse” room at the third floor that complements the original massing of the house.

When you open the front door the vista opposite in the two-story entrance area is an “L’ shaped stair with an open railing on one side up to the second floor. I liked the open plan of the main floor, with the kitchen as the pivot point between the family room and the dining room. The large sunroom was one of my two favorite rooms with its windows on three sides and French doors to a deck for direct views to the water just one lot away from the community pier.

The bedrooms were located on the second floor but my other favorite room was located on the third floor, accessed by an open stair from the master bedroom. Furnished as a sitting room, its rear “picture” window was truly that-it framed the water views and the decorative octagonal window allowed light in from the front of the house.  I loved the “bird’s eye” expanded view of the water since you were on the third floor and could look over the rooftop of the surrounding houses for a clear view of the water. The pitched ceiling with its stained wood lateral beams below made a dramatic space. It was indeed a “lighthouse”- one filled with light.

It would be easy to enjoy the outdoors and the water views since most of the main rooms had access to the decks on both floors. The site also contained both a one-car detached  garage and a studio/office/workshop outbuilding in the large fenced rear yard.

For more information about this property, contact Benson and Mangold Real Estate agents Gene Smith at 410-745-0417 (o),410-443-1571(c) or gsmith@bensonandmangold.com, and Kim Crouch Ozman at 410-745-0415 (o),410-410-829-7062 (c ) or kcrouch@bensonadmangold.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity”.

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Timeless Treasures – Houses and Gardens of Talbot County

‘Timeless Treasures’ is the theme for the 2018 Talbot County House and Garden Tour, which will take place on Saturday, May 12th, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., rain or shine.  This year’s tour consists of six extraordinary waterfront properties dating as far back as the early 1700’s.  Sponsored by the Talbot County Garden Club, the tour is part of the Maryland House and Garden Pilgrimage (MHGP).

Halcyon (Photo Credit – Laura Carney)

Talbot County enjoys more than 600 miles of waterfront and visitors of this year’s tour will explore unique waterfront properties around the County while traveling through history.  The tour will begin in the beautiful gardens of the Talbot County Historical Society and the tour’s information headquarters will be open at the Praeger Family Auditorium located at 17 S. Washington St. in Easton from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. that day.  From there you can plan your journey through the timeless treasures of Talbot County.  The first two homes are located off of Oxford Road.  Two Coves is situated on over 2 acres of land, with a unique 270-degree view of LeGates Cove.  The home was originally built in 1965 with substantial renovations being completed inside and out since 2011.  Owl’s Nest, which is situated on 13.5 acres overlooking Trippe Creek, was originally built in 1972 on property that once served as the nursery for Canterbury Manor, a 1,000-acre estate which dates back to the 1600’s.  The home has also undergone substantial renovation and redesign.  The next two homes are located down St Michaels Rd.  Halcyon on the Tred Avon River is a venerable property that has gone through substantial renovation since its origin in the mid-19th century.  Today, this gorgeous home is a perfect complement to the extraordinary graceful grounds with lovely outbuildings, an infinity swimming pool and extraordinary outdoor sculptures.  Auburn is situated on 132 acres of farm and woodlands with a mile of waterfront on Shipshead Creek and the Tred Avon River.  The oldest part of the house dates back to the 1700s.  The tour then heads down Goldsborough Neck.  A long driveway leads into Tamarind, overlooking Goldsborough Creek.  Our tour features two of their fabulous guest houses – ‘Heron House’ and ‘The Cottage’ – which exemplify very different architectural styles and interior design.   The tour completes with the historic home, Myrtle Grove. The oldest portion of the home was built between 1724 and 1734.  The home has undergone renovation over the years but the main house continues to adorn many of its original decorative features throughout. In the living room, a window behind the 1888 Steinway grand piano contains the engraved signature of Robert E. Lee.  The gardens have been preserved with all their natural Talbot County beauty as well.  All the homes are truly timeless treasures.

Tour participants are sure to be enchanted with the timeless beauty of all of the unique homes featured on this year’s tour.  Tickets will be $35 in advance at the Maryland House & Garden Pilgrimage web site at http://www.mhgp.org/tickets  or in person at Bountiful and Garden Treasures in Easton. Tickets will also be available for purchase on the day of the tour at all locations for $40. Credit cards will only be accepted for online purchases.

Eat Sprout will be providing locally sourced, organic boxed lunches for $15 at the Prager Family Auditorium located at 17 S. Washington St. in Easton.  They may be purchased online in advance at www.eatsprout.com/gardenclub or the day of the tour at the Praeger Family Auditorium.

For more information please contact the Maryland House and Garden Pilgrimage at www.mhgp.org  or contact Laura Carney at 410-310-3307 or at laurahcarney@gmail.com

Mark the date on your calendar now for May 12th, 2018!   It will be an exceptional tour!

About the Talbot County Garden Club

The Talbot County Garden Club was established in 1917 to enrich the natural beauty of the environment by sharing knowledge of gardening, fostering the art of flower arranging, maintaining civic projects, supporting projects that benefit Talbot County and encouraging the conservation of natural resources.  Noteworthy projects include maintaining the grounds of the Talbot Historical Society, Talbot County Courthouse, Talbot County Free Library, the fountain and children’s gardens at Idlewild Park and numerous other gardens and activities.  There are currently a total of 101 active, associate and honorary members.

Maryland House & Garden Tours Starts April 21

For every person that has wanted to peek into the old house at the end of a lane, now is the time. Generous property owners will open their historic sites to the public for five weekends in April and May during the Maryland House and Garden Pilgrimage (MHGP), an annual tradition since 1937. Tours run Saturday April 21st through Saturday May 26 and include the following counties: Prince George’s County (Saturday, April 21), Anne Arundel County (Saturday, April 28), Talbot County Saturday, May 12), Cecil County (Sunday, May 20) and St. Mary’s County (Saturday, May 26). (Please note that the Cecil County tour is on Sunday.)  MHGP website: www.mhgp.org

Each county’s tour includes seven or eight properties.  Complete details about each tour (including house descriptions) are available on the MHGP website. Tickets for each day’s tour are $40.00 on day of the tour and $35.00 if bought pre-tour and can be purchased in advance online on the MHGP website. Lunches or lunch suggestions will be available on most tours.

The annual spring tours are a central component of MHGP’s efforts to cultivate awareness of Maryland’s rich architectural and cultural heritage. Every year, proceeds from the tour support designated preservation projects in each host community. To date, the Pilgrimage has raised more than $1 million for the preservation and restoration of architecturally significant properties throughout the State of Maryland while entertaining and educating thousands of attendees.

“Being a part of the Pilgrimage is a wonderful way to support historic restoration in Maryland while taking advantage of the rare opportunity to visit unique and interesting sites in the different counties, “says MHGP Chair Les Foster.  The Pilgrimage has become a yearly tradition for many, as Les adds, “Each year I invite my daughters to join me on a tour – this has become one of our favorite family traditions and a great way to enjoy our beautiful Maryland spring!”

Maryland House and Garden Pilgrimage (MHGP), a nonprofit organization, is dedicated to the preservation and restoration of architecturally significant properties in the State of Maryland. The Pilgrimage has remained constant with this purpose since its formation in 1937. It is the only statewide house and garden tour organization and the oldest tour in the State of Maryland, raising and distributing well over $1 million dollars in its 81-year history to support preservation projects in each host community.

Spy House of the Week: 102 Locust Street in St. Michaels

One of my two reference books about St. Michaels is “Historic St. Michaels, An Architectural History” by Elizabeth Hughes”. St. Michaels’ initial growth was linked to the shipbuilding industry and prosperity led to the incorporation of the Town in 1804. The 1806 survey showed three “squares”, “Braddock’s Square” (the original plan of the Town), “Thompson’s Square” and “Harrison’s Square”. This week’s feature at 102 Locust Street was part of “Harrison’s Square”.

The street’s original residents were primarily employed in the shipbuilding industry and related trades.

The original house was the bungalow with the shed dormer facing Locust Street and a large shed in the rear yard contained a wood working shop. The house was first expanded with a two-story addition to the north side of the original bungalow. The front room was lined in Chestnut panels whose wood was rescued from an abandoned and demolished barn. The beautiful woodwork and the wood-burning fireplace created an inviting study for the current owner and was my favorite room.

The last addition was a “hyphen” that connected the rear shed to the two-story addition. At that time the former shed was renovated as a master suite and the woodworking tools were donated to the St. Michaels Museum on St. Mary’s Square. The finishing touch was the current owner’s renovation of the large kitchen and upgrades to the two bathrooms in the “hyphen” connection. The additions and renovations created a master bedroom, two bedrooms and two baths so a new owner could enjoy one-level living. The original part of the house could then be the living room, dining room and study.

The backyard was a serene oasis in this hybrid block of commercial structures along Talbot Street and the residences along Locust Street. Two sets of French doors in the “hyphen” led to a terrace surrounded by plantings.

This house is an example of how houses have been adapted over time but the original charming bungalow is still clearly defined for architectural buffs to appreciate. Hopefully this unique house will attract a new owner who will appreciate its place in St. Michaels’ architectural history.

 

For more information about this property, contact Wink Cowee with Benson and Mangold Real Estate at 410-745-0415 (o), 410-310-0208 (c), or winkcowee@gmail.com.

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Spy House of the Week: Mallard Point

It’s not unusual for the rear elevation of a waterfront property to be the most architecturally interesting since there are customarily a variety of windows and doors to bring the water views indoors to as many rooms as possible. The massing of this rear elevation was very pleasing with two wings at right angles to each other and the lower one telescoped down to the one-story porches that wrapped around the house.

The focal point of the higher gable wing was its chimney flanked by pairs of French doors and windows above. Steps from the French doors led directly down to the large pool. The lower wing had a wall of windows and a deck on the second floor. I love porches and this house just might win the prize for the most porches on a residence I have written about so far with its over 2000 sf of decks, pool flagstone terrace, wrap-around porch with an outdoor kitchen, a teak dining set that could seat 10, screened porch and the open pavilion opposite the large pool.

The spacious interior rooms were made for entertaining. I loved the kitchen with its hardwood floor, white cabinets, stainless steel appliances and black bar stools at the island bar. The rear wall was full-height glass with three sets of French doors that opened up to the screened porch and the water view beyond. A wide doorway led to the combination dining room and the family room with a stacked stone fireplace and the French doors seen from the outside. I liked how the built-ins with the TV cabinet was on a side wall so you could watch TV, look at the fire and the water views through the French doors without shifting your position on the plush upholstered sofas.

Guests would find it difficult to leave with four guest suites (with “en suite” baths as our Canadian cousins say on HGTV’s “Love It Or List It”). The four suites are arranged around a large communal area at the top of the stairs and there was also a den with gas fireplace.

My favorite rooms were the outdoor ones-it was easy to imagine escaping from the heat of a summer’s day under the pool pavilion or having a dinner party on the porch with nine close friends…

 

For more information about this property, contact Tom Crouch with Benson and Mangold Real Estate at 410-745-0720 (o), 410-310-8916 (c) or tcrouch@bensonandmangold.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity”

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Habitat: Collections of the Eastern Shore by Jenn Martella

I decided to become an architect when I was ten years old and residential design has been so rewarding to me throughout my career. Now that I am also writing about houses, I have enjoyed touring the wonderful houses that have become Houses of the Week. One of the things that fascinated me about the homes’ interiors was to see what people collect and how that reflects their interests and give their houses such personality. Friends to my home know I collect pitchers, one of which is a prized slender pitcher decorated with roses that belonged to my great-grandmother Rose. I also love my “mini zoo” of Oaxacan animal wood carvings with their colorful patterns and whimsical shapes.

Recently I visited the home of realtor Elizabeth Foulds to celebrate the completion of the kitchen and bath design I had done for her.

She showed me her collection of books, newspaper articles, medals and other memorabilia about her late husband Leo’s stepfather, Ralph T. Walker FAIA. When I admired the beautiful fire screen in front of Elizabeth’s fireplace, she told me it had also been designed by Walker. I love cartography and studied several framed maps of Paris that were hanging in Elizabeth’s study. She told me they had been gifts of J. P. Morgan to Mr. Walker.

I remembered his most famous buildings from my architecture history classes, so I decided to learn more about this prolific architect who had reached the pinnacle of his profession. An architect who spent the majority of his professional life in New York City, Walker’s first big break came at the age of 30 when he accepted a position with the noted architectural firm of McKenzie, Voorhees and Gmelin. In ten short years he became a partner in this prestigious firm that still exists today as HLW.

During the Roaring Twenties, he was busy contributing to the changing shape of New York City’s skyline wi

th his designs of iconic buildings including the Barclay-Vesey Telephone Building, the Western Union Building and 1 Wall Street (Irving Trust Company Building). All these buildings are recognized and treasured today for their Art Deco style.

In 1957, the American Institute of Architects proclaimed him the “Architect of the Century” and awarded him the Institute’s first Centennial Medal of Honor to celebrate the Institute’s first one hundred years. America’s most famous architect, Frank Lloyd Wright, saluted him as the “only other honest architect in America”.

Mr. Walker was dedicated to public service and served on many civic boards including the Planning Board for the U.N. and advocated stron

gly for the NYC site where the UN complex now stands. During the 1930’s, he was deeply involved with the planning of the 1933 Century of Progress in Chicago and the 1939 World’s Fair in New York. He was elected President of the American Institute of Architects and served two presidents, Eisenhower and Kennedy, as a member of Commission of Fine Arts.

Many of his New York City skyscrapers have been re-discovered by developers who have converted his Art Deco towers into sought-after luxury condominiums, “Walker Tower”’ on W. 18th Street, “Stella Tower” on W. 50th Street, the Barclay-Vesey Telephone Building at 140 West Street and 1 Wall Street.

Both sides of his grandparents immigrated from Scotland. Mr. Walker was extremely proud of his Scottish ancestry and was a life member of the St. Andrews Society of New York. The table in Elizabeth’s study first belonged to one of Mr. Walker’s grandmothers.

If you have a collection you would like to share with Spy readers, send us a photo and you just may find your collection featured in a future Spy edition. 

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Spy House of the Week: High Design in Easton Village

To me, the essence of architecture is space, form and light. Twilight is one of the best times to photograph architecture since the building is lit from within and one gets a feel for the interior rooms beyond the front elevation. The dramatic twilight shot of this house’s street elevation caught my eye with the beauty of its symmetrical three-bay arrangement of French doors and windows with a front gable above and a low-sloped roof over the front porch. The entry was defined by a shorter gable wing projecting to the side with another low sloped roof covering the front door porch.

The site is opposite a small pond in front of a backdrop of mature trees. The property is one of the few double lots in Easton Village and the extra space became a fenced manicured lawn and plantings with a focal point to a garden room open on three sides. Two double garages line the alley, one with a guest suite above and the other for storage.

Linking the garages to the house was an enclosed breezeway that was probably my favorite room with its walls of bookcases, comfortable seating and windows and French doors to the garden. The interiors were simply stunning and I was not surprised to learn that the owner was an interior designer, Jay Jenkins, of Baltimore.

The main sitting room had three pairs of French doors with transoms to the front porch and the focal point of the end wall was a fireplace flanked by framed mirrors, a clever touch instead of windows on this exterior wall. The neutral color palette was serene with layers of texture. These colors continued into the kitchen and dining area with the warm wood table and chairs, hardwood flooring and the light colored kitchen cabinetry that extended to the ceiling to emphasize the ceiling height. The cozy sitting room beyond the dining area was full of art, more books and the chaise lounge in the corner by the windows would be a perfect spot for reading.

The master suite could have been mistaken for a luxury hotel room. I loved the design of the bed with two spindles at the footboard and a padded headboard instead of a typical four-poster. The striped wallpaper was the perfect backdrop for the neutral tones and textures of the linens, wall treatments and carpeting. The master bath’s tile, console lavatory, textured wall covering and art created a spa environment.

I would enjoy being a guest in any of the guest rooms but my favorite was the one with corner windows, matchstick blinds, floor to ceiling draperies and a thick duvet cover for a restful sleep. The dark mocha walls and the light textured floor color with crisp white trim reminded me of my own room. It is always a pleasure to discover a house where the site, architecture, interiors and landscape are in harmony as this one was.

For more information about this property, contact Barb Watkins with Benson and Mangold at 410-822-1415 (o), 410-310-2021 (c), or barb.c.watkins@gmail.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity”.

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Adkins Arboretum Announces Spring Open House, Native Plant Sale

Adkins Arboretum, offering the Chesapeake gardener the largest selection of native plants for more than 20 years, announces its Spring Open House & Native Plant Sale weekendApril 27–29. The sale benefits the Arboretum’s education programs and affords the public an opportunity to learn about the Delmarva’s native plants and their connection to a healthy Chesapeake Bay.

Plants for sale include a large variety of native perennials, ferns, vines, grasses and flowering trees and shrubs for spring planting. Native flowers and trees provide food and habitat for wildlife and make colorful additions to home landscapes, whether in a perennial border, a woodland garden or a restoration project. Native honeysuckle entices hummingbirds, while tall spikes of purplish flowers grace blue wild indigo. Milkweed provides critical energy for Monarch butterflies on their winter migration to Mexico, and native azaleas present a veritable rainbow of colorful blooms.

Columbine adds color to the spring garden and attracts butterflies and hummingbirds. Photo by Kellen McCluskey.

The Open House weekend kicks off on Fri., April 27 with shopping hours beginning at 10 a.m. Chris Pax, lead designer for the Arboretum’s Native Landscape Design Center, will offer Featured Native Plants, a free program to help identify ideal plants for specific spots in your landscape, at 3 p.m. The public is invited from 4 to 6 p.m. for light fare, music, a cash wine and beer bar, a silent auction and shopping in a fun and festive atmosphere.

Plant sales continue Sat., April 28 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sun., April 29 from noon to 4 p.m. Presale orders may be placed at adkinsarboretum.org through April 8. Simply place your order, and your plants will be ready for pick-up during the Open House weekend. Following the Open House, plants will be for sale at the Visitor’s Center throughout the growing season.

The Arboretum is a participating nursery in the Marylanders Plant Trees native tree discount program. For any native tree valued at $50 or more, shoppers will receive a $25 discount. Some of the special larger trees available for this discount include maple, birch, dogwood and holly.

The Arboretum gift shop will be open during the Open House weekend and will offer books and nature-inspired gifts for gardeners. Members, including those who join during the Open House, receive a 10% discount on plant, gift shop and book purchases. Members at the Contributor ($100) level and above receive a 20% discount on plants.

For more information, call 410-634-2847, extension 0 or visit adkinsarboretum.org.

Adkins Arboretum is a 400-acre native garden and preserve at the headwaters of the Tuckahoe Creek in Caroline County. Open year round, the Arboretum offers educational programs for all ages about nature and gardening. For more information, visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

Spy House of the Week: Halycon Hanson

I never tire of driving down my favorite streets in Easton’s Historic District- Hanson, Harrison and Goldsborough Streets. This house on Hanson caught my eye with its four-square plan enhanced with craftsman details including the front porch Doric columns and large bay and multi-paned windows. Two sunroom additions on opposite sides of the house extended the ground floor living space.

Only one of my homes had an entrance hall so this house’s spacious entry with a vista from the front door to the “U” shaped stair with an open balustrade had great appeal. Opening off the entrance hall was the living room with a fireplace and direct access to the sunroom with windows on three sides which became a second sitting room. The focal point of the dining room next to the living room was a wide bay window that opened one wall to the sunroom.

Since I work at home a great deal, I envied the office at the rear corner of the house which was a cozy quiet area for contemplative work. The work space nestled between two corner windows was perfect for taking a break from computer work to focus on the landscape. When one needed a longer respite from work, the sunroom or the rear yard was only a step away.

I enjoy cooking for family and friends and this large kitchen open to the second sunroom would be a great space for gathering to cook and to share a meal with loved ones. Laundry/mud rooms can’t be overestimated and this one has a door to the rear yard for cleaning up after gardening or play in the deep rear yard and was convenient to the parking pad for bringing in groceries.

The master bedroom with its wide bay window made this room a special retreat. The third floor area dormers are low to the floor and I couldn’t help thinking if I lived in this house my two cats would perch at each window as sentinels until they heard my car pull in the driveway.

For more information about this property, contact Trey Rider with Meredith Fine Properties at 410-822-2001 (o),443-786-0235 (c) or trey@treyrider.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity”.

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Spy House of the Week: Historic House in “The Hill”

The geographic area bordered by East Dover, South, Harrison and Talbot Streets and Easton’s Rails to Trails is a hallowed place in the history of Easton. The neighborhood known as “The Hill” is part of the National Register of Historic Places that includes Easton’s Historic District.

Scholars and archaeologists believe it was founded in the last decade of the 18th century by slaves who had bought their freedom and others who were freed by Methodists and Quakers. The first census in 1790 recorded 410 free African-Americans who were living in “The Hill. This is remarkable since at that time only 250 free African-Americans resided in Baltimore.

For the past several years, The Hill Community Project, in partnership with the East End Neighborhood Association, Historic Easton, Inc., Talbot County and the State of Maryland have been involved in archaeological digs and research to learn more about this unique site. Their knowledge may determine if “The Hill” is older than Treme, LA, currently recognized as the oldest US neighborhood founded by free African-Americans.

Homeowners and developers passionate about historic preservation have also begun restoration projects in “The Hill”.

This restoration of the “Trippe-Smith” house at 208 South St. was a labor of love by its developer, Gabrielle Koeppel, who converted this original duplex into a single family home. The two original exterior doors on the front and rear elevations remained as testament to its past.

The main floor is now an open plan interrupted by a small core of the stairwell and the powder room. The continuous vista from the front to the rear doors reveals the living room that now spanned the entire width of the house with sunlight from large windows on three sides, the adjacent original dining room defined by its corner windows and the kitchen that now combined the two unit kitchens into one spacious room. The other original dining room could become an office or a TV room.

Since each unit of the original duplex had one bath on the second floor, there is now a dedicated master bath as part of a spacious master suite. I loved how Ms. Koeppel kept the original claw-foot tub in one bathroom and diligently searched for period porcelain wall hung lavatories and period faucets from Second Chance in Baltimore to enhance the bathrooms. Three other bedrooms and another bath complete the second floor plan.

I was very impressed with Ms. Koeppel’s attention to detail-the beautiful wood floors shine again, period door knobs and light fixtures found on Ebay and auctions look right at home and she even convinced one owner of a barn to relinquish the exterior lights that now illuminate the front doors The wood shingled main roof, metal porch roof, the wood siding, windows with historic shutters and historic paint palette make this home a gem.

I like to think that the Trippe, White and Smith families who called 208 South Street home would be pleased with how lovingly their house was restored for future generations of families to enjoy.

For more information about this property, contact Gabrielle Koeppel at 202-744-0877, “Equal Housing Opportunity”

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.