Talbot Hospice Quilt Tells Story of Grief – Holiday Grief Support Sessions Announced

The process of grieving does not only happen with the deaths of loved ones, but also occurs with those caring for those who are terminally-ill or dying. Talbot Hospice offers support for both through its caregiver and bereavement support groups.

According to Jeanne Hechmer of Easton, who has been a member of Talbot Hospice’s Caregiver Support Group for about a year, talking with others who are experiencing the loss and grief around illness and death can be helpful in finding the “normal” again in our lives. The group meets every Thursday from 1 to 2:15 p.m. and is for caregivers who are taking care of a loved one with a life-limiting illness. The meeting offers the opportunity to listen for solutions to challenging situations and a chance to share situations in a compassionate environment.

Screen Shot 2015-12-01 at 9.57.15 AMHechmer, who is a longtime quilter, recently created a quilt for the new Support Group meeting room in the Clark-Guthrie Center at Talbot Hospice.

She comments, “Quilting has been my therapy through this journey of caregiving. I make quilts to tell stories. Shelly Kulp, the Bereavement Coordinator at Talbot Hospice, asked me if I could create a quilt for the blank wall in our meeting room. I named the quilt “Disruption” because of how our lives are disrupted by illness and death.”

The quilt, which boasts bold purple and blue fabrics, includes squares split in two and stitched back together, representing how the support groups help put lives back together following illness or death. The tie dye fabrics in the squares resemble the tears shed in the grieving process, while the nature-related fabrics show the importance of caregivers need to care for themselves through the process. The ribbon yarn that joins the squares together represents the support network that the group weaves together to get them through the journey.

Shelly Kulp, comments, “Jeanne has been an integral part of the Caregiver Support Group. We were thrilled when she agreed to make the quilt. People notice the quilt immediately when they arrive in the group the first time. Jeanne wove her ‘caregiver journey’ into the quilt. It helps them feel the welcome nature of the group.”

Hechmer adds, “It’s amazing at the end of one session how everyone says they are so grateful for having come to the support group. They often say that don’t feel alone anymore. We are like an instant family.”

The Caregiver Support Group meets weekly and includes approximately eight members. It provides a safe place for caregivers to tell their stories and to feel support. In addition to the Caregiver Support Group, Talbot Hospice offers two six-week sessions of group grief support each fall and spring. For Hechmer, who recently experienced the death of the husband for whom she cared, the next step will be to attend a Grief Support Group. Hospice Foundation of America recommends that bereaved people wait until five to six months post-loss to join a support group.

Talbot Hospice also offers individual and family grief consultation. There is also an ongoing monthly grief support group for those in the community grieving the loss of a loved one due to substance abuse. The group meets on the 2nd Wednesday of the month from 6 to 7:30 p.m. For children and adolescents, Talbot Hospice works in conjunction with both public and private schools in Talbot County.

During the holidays, Talbot Hospice offers a special support group, “Grieving Through the Holidays,” which will meet this year on December 15 from 5 to 7 p.m. or December 16 from 1 to 3 p.m. This session is specifically designed to address this special time of the year when it may be challenging to face the traditions and social events associated with the holidays while going through grief.

Kulp adds, “It is helpful to figure out what your holidays will look like in grief. Grief does affect how you celebrate the holidays and we can offer positive and innovative ideas for how to handle it and have realistic expectations.”

According to Kulp, people who are grieving can give themselves permission to say no to things they have done before and yes to new things during the holidays. She adds that it is also a time to ask for help and to find people to help you get through the holidays.

Talbot Hospice’s bereavement services are offered without charge and there is no requirement for a loved one to have been a hospice patient. Bereavement services are also offered to anyone, regardless of county of residence. Support Groups meet at 586 Cynwood Drive in Talbot Hospice’s Clark-Guthrie Center. Visit talbothospice.org or contact Talbot Hospice’s Bereavement Coordinator at 410-822-6681, ext. 16.

Caption: Pictured left to right are quilter Jeanne Hechmer of Easton, who has been a member of Talbot Hospice’s Caregiver Support Group for about a year, with Shelly Kulp, the Bereavement Coordinator at Talbot Hospice. Hechmer recently created this quilt, titled “Disruption,” for the new Support Group meeting room in the Clark-Guthrie Center at Talbot Hospice. During the holidays, Talbot Hospice is also offering a special support group, “Grieving Through the Holidays,” which will meet this year on December 15 from 5 to 7 p.m. or December 16 from 1 to 3 p.m., for dealing with holidays while going through the grief process.

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UM Shore Regional Health Continues Fall “Ask the Expert” Series

University of Maryland Shore Regional Health continues its “Ask the Expert” series with scheduled presentations throughout the region during November. “Ask the Expert” offers area residents access to the most current information on relevant health care topics, presented by a variety of clinical experts.

Upcoming events are:

“Stroke Signs, Symptoms, Treatment and Recovery”—Tuesday, November 10, 1pm. Jessica Fluharty, BSN, RN, FNE-A, Neuroscience Specialist and Stroke Coordinator, UM SMC at Easton Talbot Senior Center – Brookletts Place, 400 Brookletts Avenue, Easton
Brought to the community in partnership with Upper Shore Aging, Inc., the Area Agency on Aging for Caroline, Kent and Talbot Counties.

“Keeping Your Child Safe on the Field: How to Prevent Sports-Related Injuries of the Body and Brain” Tuesday, November 10, 6pm. Walid Kamsheh, MD, of Shore Neurology and Sleep Medicine, and Jason Jancosko, DO, of the Orthopedic Center will discuss sports medicine and concussions. Nick Rajacich Health Education Center at UM Shore Medical Center at Easton – 219 S. Washington Street

“Palliative Care – The Bridge”—Thursday, November 12. Sharon Stagg, DNP, MPH, RN, Nurse Practitioner, UM Shore Regional Health Palliative Care Program, and Charyl (Sam) Ricketts, BS, RNC, CHPN, Regional Community Educator, UM Shore Regional Health‑ Post-Acute Services

Chestertown Town Building, 118 N. Cross Street, Chestertown, Second Floor. Brought to the community in partnership with HomePorts.

“Accessible Care, Comprehensive Support: Cancer Prevention and Support Services in Your Local Community”—Thursday, November 12, 6pm. Patty Plaskon, PhD, LCSW-C, OSW-C, Coordinator of Oncology Social Work; Sharon Richter, BSN, RN, CCRC, OCN, Clinical Research Nurse; and Margot Spies, RN, BSN, OCN, Nurse Navigator, all team members of the Cancer Center at UM Shore Regional Health. UM Shore Medical Center at Dorchester, Third Floor Conference Room
“Stroke Signs, Symptoms, Treatment and Recovery”—Wednesday, November 17, 10am. Jessica Fluharty, BSN, RN, FNE-A, Neuroscience Specialist and Stroke Coordinator, UM SMC at Easton Caroline Senior Center, 403 S. 7th Street, Suite 127 Denton. Brought to the community in partnership with Upper Shore Aging, Inc., the Area Agency on Aging for Caroline, Kent and Talbot Counties.

“Accessible Care, Comprehensive Support: Cancer Prevention and Support Services in Your Local Community”—Thursday, November 19, 6pm. Patty Plaskon, PhD, LCSW-C, OSW-C, Coordinator of Oncology Social Work; Sharon Richter, BSN, RN, CCRC, OCN, Clinical Research Nurse; and Margot Spies, RN, BSN, OCN, Nurse Navigator, all team members of the Cancer Center at UM Shore Regional Health. Nick Rajacich Health Education Center at UM Shore Medical Center at Easton – 219 S. Washington Street

Attendees are asked to RSVP to Cathy Wright, 410-822-1000, ext. 5222, or e-mail Cathy.Wright@umm.edu.

 

Free Women’s Seminar Focuses on Managing Health and Financial Issues

Diana Johnson, vice president of Avon-Dixon, LLC

Diana Johnson, vice president of Avon-Dixon, LLC

“From a Woman’s Point of View — Nurturing Your Physical and Financial Well Being,” a free seminar offered by University of Maryland Memorial Hospital Foundation, will be held on Thursday, October 15, 9:30 – 11:30 a.m. at the Talbot Country Club, 6142 Country Club Drive in Easton.

The event will feature two presentations, “Update: The Expanded Clark Comprehensive Breast Center and the Use of 3-D Mammography,” by Roberta Lilly, MD, MPH, FACS, medical director, Clark Comprehensive Breast Center at UM Shore Regional Health, and “Measures Women Can Take to Prevent a Financial Crisis for Themselves and Their Families,” by Diana Johnson, vice president, Avon-Dixon Agency, LLC and Beth Spurry, president and owner, Tred Avon Family Wealth

Beth Spurry, president and owner, Tred Avon Family Wealth

Beth Spurry, president and owner, Tred Avon Family Wealth

Dr. Lilly holds a master’s in public health and is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons. She came to UM Shore Regional Health in 2012, and under her leadership, the Breast Center was awarded the NAPBC (National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers) stamp of approval in 2014. The NAPBC represents a commitment to quality care at the local and national level with ongoing monitoring of outcomes that meet or exceed national benchmarks. While providing timely, patient-centered care that adheres to the highest quality standards of breast care, Dr. Lilly is committed to helping patients become fully informed partners in their health care decisions. She also has a special interest in the impact of fitness and nutrition on breast cancer and is principal investigator of two ongoing studies designed to promote healthy eating and regular exercise among breast cancer survivors.

Diana Johnson is a life/health agent and an employee benefits broker/consultant with 26 years’ experience. Her professional designations include Certified Employee Benefits Specialist (CEBS), Chartered Life Underwriter (CLU), Chartered Financial Consultant (ChFC) and Life Underwriter Training Council Fellow (LUTCF). Diana’s industry accolades include “Insurance Person of the Year” (2003 and 2007) by the Eastern Shore Association of Health Underwriters (ESAHU); media chair and past president of ESAHU; and past president, National Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors (NAIFA-Chesapeake). She is a member of UM Memorial Hospital Foundation’s Planned Giving Committee.

Roberta Lilly, MD, medical director, Clark Comprehensive Breast Center at UM Shore Regional Health

Roberta Lilly, MD, medical director, Clark Comprehensive Breast Center at UM Shore Regional Health

Beth Spurry is president and owner of Tred Avon Family Wealth in Easton. She is a Certified Financial Planner (CFP) and a Certified Trust and Financial Advisor (CTFA). She is actively involved with a variety of local organizations, including The Women and Girls Fund, For All Seasons, The Sultana Education Foundation, the May Foundation and the Planned Gifts Committee of UM Memorial Hospital Foundation.

Light refreshments will be served. While admission is free, seating is limited and reservations are required; please RSVP by contacting Janet Andrews, 410-822-1000, ext. 5792 or janet@umm.edu.

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Oxford Community Center to Host Free Health Information Programs

The Oxford Community Center is hosting two health programs. The first, presented by the University of Maryland Memorial Hospital Foundation, is Advanced Care Planning Boot Camp on Saturday August 15 at 9:30. The second program is on Maryland and Talbot Emergency Services and will focus on what happens when you call 911 and how medical decisions are made when the EMTs arrive. This program is at noon on Wednesday, August 19. More details on the programs follow:

Saturday, August 15 9:30AM: ‘Advanced Care Planning Boot Camp’

As part of its Seminar Series, University of Maryland Memorial Hospital Foundation presents the discussion, “Advanced Care Planning Boot Camp: Advanced Directives and Medical Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment (MOLST),” at the Oxford Community Center, 200 Oxford Road, Oxford.

Guest Presenter Charyl “Sam” Ricketts, BS, RNC, CHPN, regional community educator at University of Maryland Shore Regional Health, will provide an explanation of Advanced Directives and MOLST, and discuss what decisions can and should be considered in preparing for future medical needs.

Admission is free but seating is limited. To reserve a seat, contact Janet Andrews at 410-822-1000, ext. 5792 or email janet@umm.edu.

Wednesday, August 19 Noon: Emergency Services

Learn about Maryland and Talbot County emergency services and what to expect when you dial 911. Who will come? What kind of assistance can they provide? What happens if you are not conscious? How are medical decisions about treatment, such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), made? Learn the role of Advanced Medical Directives, Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) forms and Maryland Orders for Life Sustaining Treatments (MOLST) forms in their response.

Join EMT Steve Mroczek for an important discussion of our local services. Steve is the Ambulance Captain of the Oxford Fire Company, a member of Talbot County Emergency Services Advisory Board & the Maryland State Firemen’s Association’s EMS Committee.

This is a brown-bag lunch. Ice tea and cookies will be provided.

UM Memorial Hospital Foundation Offers ‘Advanced Care Planning Boot Camp’ in Oxford

As part of its Seminar Series, University of Maryland Memorial Hospital Foundation presents the discussion, “Advanced Care Planning Boot Camp: Advanced Directives and Medical Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment (MOLST),” at 9:30 a.m., Saturday, August 15 at Oxford Community Center, 200 Oxford Road, Oxford.

Guest Presenter Charyl “Sam” Ricketts, BS, RNC, CHPN, regional community educator at University of Maryland Shore Regional Health, will provide an explanation of Advanced Directives and MOLST, and discuss what decisions can and should be considered in preparing for future medical needs.

Admission is free but seating is limited. To reserve a seat, contact Janet Andrews at 410-822-1000, ext. 5792 or email janet@umm.edu.

As part of the University of Maryland Medical System (UMMS), University of Maryland Shore Regional Health is the principal provider of comprehensive health care services for more than 170,000 residents of Caroline, Dorchester, Kent, Queen Anne’s and Talbot counties on Maryland’s Eastern Shore.

Tools for Listening to Your Teen (Prevention 101)

When we asked a group of kids ages 13 through 17 about their concerns, they said they wanted to be able to communicate with their parents in healthy, positive ways. Can you believe it? Your teen wants a connection with you as much as you want one with them! Our kids want to talk to us! So where’s the breakdown?

Some kids just need an invitation. Others need more time to open up. Still others, though, are like the girl who said, Every time I attempt to talk to my parents, they either yell at me before I tell my whole story or lecture me. If they’d be more open to talk with me and let me do some more talking, I’d talk with them a lot more.”

Wherever you and your teen are on that spectrum of speak­ing, things can get better. And they will, when you take advantage of some tools parents and youth workers and counselors have been using with the kids they care about. Let’s help you and your teen get to a deeper level by stocking your com­munication toolbox.

Listening Tools

Here are seven ways to make sure you really hear your teen — and to make sure he or she knows it.

  1. Give him your full attention. I know you’re so busy that you hardly have a moment to yourself. But now isn’t the time for mul­titasking. Turn off the TV, your cell phone or computer — what­ever’s competing for your ears.
  2. Reflect her emotions; don’t mock them. Teens love to see their feelings reflected in your face. It tells them you understand how they felt when the coach yelled at them today. If their emotions seem over-the-top or the reasons for them seem trivial, remember that their world is smaller than yours — which makes each event look bigger.
  3. Restate in your own words what you heard him say. Let’s say your son is dating a girl named Jen. One day he comes home and tells you about Jen flirting with his best friend. You might say, “So, what I’m hearing you say is that it really hurt when Jen looked at Brian with the look she usually gives you.” Restating helps ensure that you’re truly hearing your teen. If you restate the situation incorrectly, it gives your teen a chance to re-explain, too.
  4. Display attentive body language. Skip the eye rolling, sighs, arms crossed tightly against the chest, and looking over your shoulder or into the distance. Sit cross-legged on the floor or sofa, or turn a chair around and sit with your arms resting on the back. Lean forward slightly, nodding as appropriate.
  5. Decide to be interested in what she’s saying. This can be hard after a long day at work, coming home to a teen who wants to chatter about things that seem insignif­icant to you. The more you pay attention and ask clarifying questions, the more you’ll find yourself interested in her life. It may help to remind yourself that what you’re really interested in isher.
  6. Listen to actions.How do you do that? You notice whether your teen is slamming doors or leaving incriminating notes from a boyfriend or girlfriend around the house. Is something wrong at school? In a relationship? Pay attention to their behaviors.
  7. Be alert for moments of honesty and vulnerability.Teens will, on occasion, break down and spill what’s on their hearts. When they do, give them all the time they need to share. Be supportive. Then ask, “Do you want me to give suggestions or help? Or do you just want me to listen?”

Location Tools

Where you communicate with your teen is important. Here are four things to keep in mind about the places in which you talk:

  1. Pick a place that provides an “out.”Kids say it’s easier to talk with their parents if there’s something else to focus on when things get awkward. Examples of “safety valves”: traveling in the car, eating ice cream or a meal, playing a game, walking in the park, putting a puzzle together, painting a wall, going to a museum, riding bikes. Teens want to talk, but don’t want the pressure of having to do it without a break.
  2. Avoid distractions.A safety valve (see #1) is a relief; a dis­traction grabs attention whether you want it to or not. Is that restaurant a good place to talk, or is the music always too loud? Have you turned off your cell phone? If you talk in the living room, will you hear little brother bouncing that tennis ball against the garage door? One teen found that even car conversations didn’t work in her family: “Sometimes [my parents] are too concentrated on driving or whatever they are doing and don’t pay attention to what I am saying.”
  3. Choose a safe place.Kids want a place where they feel at ease sharing the scary parts of their hearts. Where is that for your teen? In his room? In yours? On a jogging path? If you don’t know, it’s okay to ask.
  4. If you find a place that works, stick with it.Try taking your teen to breakfast or lunch once a week. Establish a habit like this and your kids may get comfortable enough to open up, even asking hard questions about life. Try not to bring your own list of hard ques­tions, though; your teen may begin to shy away from those meal­times if they turn into interrogations or preaching practice.

Talbot Partnership encourages parents to be aware of the signs and symptoms of drug abuse so they can intervene early to help prevent their children from starting or continuing to use alcohol/drugs.

For more information on the Prevention of Substance Abuse please contact Talbot Partnership @410-819-8067. We are Caring for our Community by providing information, resources and support to prevent substance abuse.  

 

By Joe White and Lissa Halls Johnson

Please also visit our website at www.talbotpartnership.org or find us on Facebook.