Talbot County Health Department Prevention Office Launches New Campaign

The Talbot County Health Department Prevention Office has launched a new campaign, ‘Talbot’s Got Heart,’ which includes screenings of the film ‘Written Off’ followed with free Naloxone training and doses at seven locations across Talbot County.

The next event is Wednesday, Oct. 25 at Queen Anne’s-Hillsboro Fire Department. Doors open at 5:30 and the film, which runs 117 minutes starts at 6 p.m., with a 30-minute Naloxone training immediately after. Each person or family trained will receive a free box of Naloxone, which includes two doses, along with a window cling.

Registration is requested and available at www.TalbotsGotHeart.org, along with a complete schedule of events. The events are in partnership with Mariah’s Mission Fund of the Mid-Shore Community Foundation.

Commonly sold under the brand name Narcan, Naloxone is a life-saving medication that reverses an opioid overdose yet has no abuse potential. Available in Maryland without a prescription, side effects of Narcan are minimal and the medication is safe for children and pregnant women.

The film ‘Written Off’ is a powerful documentary that details the life of Matt Edwards, who lost his battle with heroin dependency. ‘Written Off’ is intended to help change the conversation about drug dependency, as told through Edwards’ personal journals. Edwards grew up in Wisconsin and his first high came from a doctor, prescribed for a botched toe surgery.

The film is not yet rated and does depict some drug use and contains some foul language, but there are no age restrictions on attendance. More information is available at www.written-off.com.

In addition to the community trainings, several ‘Lunch and Learn’ trainings are offered for local business owners and employees through the Talbot County Chamber of Commerce.

Those trainings are scheduled from noon until 1 p.m. at the chamber office on Oct. 24, Nov. 8 and Nov. 30. Each session can hold up to 16 people. Registration is available online at www.talbotchamber.org or by calling the chamber at 410-822-4653.

Alexandra Duff, prevention coordinator with Talbot County Health Department administers the trainings. Funding for the Naloxone came from a state grant that provided resources for 266 boxes of the life-saving drug. Those boxes, combined with Duff’s existing supply amounts to 350 boxes available for trainings. With two doses in each box, the trainings will provide 700 free doses for our community.

“Last year in Maryland more than 2,000 people died from an opioid overdose,” Duff said. “This grant and campaign enables us to get 700 doses of this life-saving medicine across our county.”

Trainings include an overview of how to recognize the signs of an overdose; how to respond to an overdose; and how to administer Naloxone.

In addition, each training includes general information on Maryland’s Good Samaritan Law, which protects people who call 911 for an overdose from prosecution for certain crimes, and information on getting Naloxone.

Training certificates are good for two years. Renewal certificates do require a refresher course.

For more information on Naloxone or other substances contact Duff or Kirsten Moore, community health educator at 410-819-5600.

The Talbot County Health Department Prevention Office helps community groups, agencies and individuals in providing programs and activities to prevent alcohol, tobacco and other drug abuse, and to build a healthier community. Resources include parenting skills, video and resource loan library, awareness campaigns and educational workshops.

 Established in 2014, Mariah’s Mission Fun of the Mid-Shore Community Foundation is a non-profit that provides support groups and resources to empower families and individuals struggling with the effects of substance use disorder. Valerie Albee founded the fund in honor of her daughter, Mariah, who lost her life to heroin.

Shore Health: Maryland to Offer Online Shopping Tool for Medical Procedures

The Maryland Health Care Commission, the state’s independent regulatory agency, is unveiling a website on which people scheduling a hip replacement, knee replacement, hysterectomy or vaginal delivery can see price differences among different providers for the same procedure.

The site is launching amid rising health-care costs and as some consumers turn to insurance plans with high deductibles.

The state site is meant to give consumers a tool to compare prices and quality on four common medical procedures at hospitals around the state that patients otherwise would have difficulty finding on their own.

Read the full story in the Washington Post here

Dr. Terry Detrich Joins Bratton Neurocognitive Clinic at Bayleigh Chase

Integrace Bayleigh Chase, a forward-thinking life plan community based in Easton, announces that Terry Detrich, M.D. is joining the Samuel and Alexia Bratton Neurocognitive Clinic on October 2. A neurologist who has practiced in the local community for over 40 years, Dr. Detrich will be joining medical director Allan Anderson, M.D. and nurse practitioner Yvonne Liswell on the clinic team, as it expands its services to provide a more comprehensive approach to supporting families on Maryland’s Eastern Shore living with Alzheimer’s Disease and other neurocognitive impairments.

The addition of Dr. Detrich signifies the clinic’s evolution from traditional memory care to a more advanced and holistic neurocognitive model of care. This model not only focuses on diagnosing and treating impairments associated with memory, but also disorders that present in all five cognitive domains of the brain, including changes in language, motor skills, balance, visual/spatial perception and executive functions.

Dr. Detrich’s specialty in neurology, in collaboration with Dr. Anderson’s specialty in geriatric psychiatry, enables clinic patients to benefit from a multi-disciplinary team utilizing the most advanced diagnostic tools and treatments. Each patient receives a comprehensive evaluation to obtain an accurate and detailed diagnosis, followed by a thorough care plan to optimize quality of life for every individual and their family.

“We are happy and honored to welcome Dr. Terry Detrich to our clinic team, as his expertise and well-respected reputation are unparalleled in our region,” said Allan Anderson, M.D., medical director, the Samuel and Alexia Bratton Neurocognitive Clinic. “It is our priority to continue to expand the services we provide to our greater community, and ensure that families on Maryland’s Eastern Shore have access to the most advanced diagnostics and therapies to help those living with not just memory loss, but all forms of neurocognitive changes.”

“I am thrilled to be working with Dr. Anderson and the Bayleigh Chase team. This is an exciting new direction in my professional career that will allow me to continue to provide care to the greater community in a high-quality patient and caregiver environment,” said Terry Detrich, M.D.

The Samuel and Alexia Bratton Neurocognitive Clinic is located within the Integrace Bayleigh Chase community at 545 Cynwood Lane in Easton. The clinic evaluates individuals on an outpatient basis. For more information or to request an evaluation, please call 410-820-5191.

Located on a 35-acre campus in historic Easton, Bayleigh Chase is a not-for-profit life plan community that affords residents a lifestyle of flexibility and choice to live life on their own terms. Bayleigh Chase offers independent living options in its villas, cottages and apartment homes, as well as a continuum of supportive living services, including assisted living, memory support, outpatient and short-term rehabilitation, skilled nursing and diagnostic and treatment support through the Samuel and Alexia Bratton Neurocognitive Clinic. For more information, please call 410-763-7167 or visit www.bayleighchase.org.

Easton Business Alliance and For All Seasons Kick Off “No Matter What…You Matter”

On October 6, 2017, from 5 to 8 p.m., For All Seasons will kick off its NO MATTER WHAT . . . YOU MATTER Campaign at the Bartlett Pear at 28 South Harrison Street in Easton. The event will include refreshments and live music provided by the Choptank River Big Band. The event kicks off Mental Health Awareness Week (October 7 – 14, 2017) and the launch of For All Seasons new suicide prevention campaign, NO MATTER WHAT…YOU MATTER. The event is part of the Easton Business Alliance’s First Friday stroll through the local galleries and shops.

The Suicide Prevention Campaign was inspired by the soundtrack of the Tony Award winning Broadway musical, “Dear Evan Hansen.” This past spring, Amy Haines and Richard Marks’ Dock Street Foundation invited 40 representatives from several Talbot County service agencies and educational institutions to board a bus bound for NYC to see Ben Platt and the cast of “Dear Evan Hansen.” Both Haines and Marks had seen the play and felt it would be helpful if shared with our local providers of care. They noted, “We were moved and inspired by the relevance and impact of the show particularly as it incorporated social media’s influence on our society and youth. We appreciate For All Season’s leadership and coordination with all agencies in our community assisting our citizens facing mental and emotional challenges.”

For All Seasons Executive Director Beth Anne Langrell shares that returning from the show she knew that Richard and Amy’s gift could last much more than just one day. She thought it offered an opportunity to reach students and those in the community in the same way that the show reached everyone on the trip that day. It was then that For All Seasons decided to begin a new campaign and start a conversation about suicide prevention.

According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) every 13 minutes someone dies by suicide. For every suicide, 25 suicide attempts are made. In addition, 1 in 5 Americans live with a mental health condition.

For All Seasons hopes that by discussing the signs and symptoms associated with suicide that it can raise awareness about the issue in our community. Because family and friends are often the first to recognize the warning signs of suicide, they can be critical to helping an individual find treatment with a provider who specializes in diagnosing and treating mental health conditions.

For All Seasons wants people to know that If they think a friend or family member is considering suicide, they should reach out and start a conversation. Talking openly about suicidal thoughts and feelings can save a life. The following are three steps to help people begin the conversation:

Ask directly – “Are you having suicidal thoughts?” – Let them know you care.
Stay and Listen – Let them share their thoughts and feelings.
Get help – Connect them with a friend, family member or crisis hotline at 1-888-407-8018.

Langrell adds, “The launch of our campaign, No Matter What . . . You Matter will create an ongoing dialogue with agencies and educators who attended the musical, as well as others who are interested in joining the conversation about this growing issue in our community. The campaign will include dialogue circles, educational outreach and community events. We want people to know that no matter what, they matter.

The Easton Business Alliance is participating by donating a portion of their sales on specific dates during Mental Health Awareness Week toward For All Seasons Suicide Prevention Campaign. The following Easton businesses are donating on the dates listed:

Bon Mojo – Friday, October 13, Chef and Shower – Saturday, October 14, Colonial Jewelers of Easton – Friday, October 13, Easton Bowl – Friday, October 13, Harrison’s Wines and Liquors – Wednesday, October 11, Kiln Born Creations – Sunday, October 8, Krave – Friday, October 13, La De Da – Friday, October 13, Levity – Thursday, October 12, Lizzie Dee – Wednesday, October 11, Marc | Randall – Friday, October 13, Nestled Baby & Child – Friday, October 13, Out of the Fire- Thursday, October 12, Rise Up Coffee – Tuesday, October 10, Trade Whim – Friday, October 13, and Vintage Books and Fine Arts – Friday, October 13.

Additional sponsors include Acme, Ashley Insurance, Bartlett Pear Inn, Choptank River Big Band, Doc’s Downtown Grille, Easton Business , Easton Pizzeria, Hair of the Dog, Laser Letters, QATV, Talbot Mentors, Tidewater Inn, Ed & Beth Anne Langrell, Diane Flagler, Mary Wittemann & David Urbani, and Westphal Jewelers.

For All Seasons provides Trauma Certified Individual, Family and Group Therapy; Crisis and Advocacy Services for Adult, Child & Adolescent Victims of Sexual Assault, Rape & Trauma; Adult, Child & Adolescent Psychiatry; Substance Use Disorder Services (in collaboration with Corsica River Substance Use Disorder Services).

For All Seasons offers individual and group therapy, general, child and adolescent therapy, marriage and couples counseling, grief counseling, school-based mental health therapy, urgent care services, Rape Crisis Response, Rape Crisis Counseling and Support, 24-Hour English and Spanish Hotlines, and education and outreach programming. For further information about For All Seasons, call 410-822-1018. For the 24-Hour Crisis Hotline, call Toll-Free: 800-310-7273.

Spy Intern Projects: Lighting the Way Against Substance Abuse

For weeks, the purple lights in Easton have gained notable attention and for good reason. Standing up against substance abuse is something that everyone can get behind.

On Monday, Talbot Goes Purple had their lighting ceremony in front of the Easton courthouse. Sheriff Joe Gamble and Lucie Hughes, of Tidewater Rotary, explained why substance abuse awareness and prevention is important to learn. 

The event brought together the community in a sea of purple shirts as the Talbot Goes Purple youth group officially flipped the switch. John Hines, the supervisor of electrical engineering, helped oversee the young ambassadors as the finishing touches on his masterpiece were placed. Easton Utilities wrapped a total of 152 light poles in downtown.

Chris Herren spoke the following night at the Easton High School auditorium. ‘The Herren Project’, a mission for taking the first steps to sobriety and educational awareness, was founded by Herren in 2011. Since then, Herren has dedicated his life to helping others understand the meaning of addiction and how they can help too. “If I can help just a single person in this room, that’ll make it all worth it,” he said. Herren shared his own life struggles with drugs and hopes that the youth will listen to his message. The best prevention is awareness

For more information about the Herren Project or Talbot Goes Purple click the links Herren Project or Talbot Goes Purple

Tori Pack is the Talbot Spy intern for 2017-18. A graduate of Easton High School, Tori has spent the last year as a mentor in the non-profit organization, Talbot Mentors. Tori’s interest in writing and film have ushered in a young voice for the Talbot Spy that still has much to say.

Lifting Hearts and Lives in Tilghman by Amy Steward

Since For All Seasons has been providing treatment for people with mental health and substance use disorders on Tilghman Island, hearts are being lifted there. Michael Flaherty, PhD, who lives part-time on Tilghman Island and attends the Tilghman Island United Methodist Church wanted to help with some of the issues he was seeing as a resident. Flaherty, a psychologist who practices in Pennsylvania and has national expertise in addiction and mental health issues, thought it would be nice if the church could provide healthy mind, body and spirit outreach in the Tilghman community.

Pictured left to right are Ed Langrell, Marcia Gilliam, Ricky Vitanovec, Jane Copple, Katie Cox, Beth Anne Langrell, and Zack Schlag who performed a Heart and Music fundraising concert on Tilghman Island

Pastor Everett Landon of Tilghman Island UMC agreed and the two decided to approach For All Seasons about getting services there. Flaherty recalls, “We decided to do something about the problem and For All Seasons and Beth Anne Langrell, their Executive Director, came right on board. We wanted to bring services to the Island so people didn’t have to travel ‘up the road’ to be seen. Many just couldn’t.”

Within months, For All Seasons counselors opened shop in the pastor’s office at the church and began seeing clients. To date, more than 20 have used the services of For All Seasons and a Narcotics Anonymous meeting that was launched at the church. Flaherty adds, “We are trying to make inroads through education, counseling and peer support. We did a needs assessment of the community and have identified a need for wellness programs, healthy cooking classes, and exercise programs. In June, the church hosted an Overdose Prevention Night with its partners Talbot County Health Department, For All Seasons, Corsica River, the Talbot County Sheriff’s Department. The goal of the event, which drew over 50 people, was to help residents identify and prevent overdoses. Forty participants received doses of Narcan.

Efforts are now underway to provide a peer support network in the community, as the third part of the program, which has been focused on counseling and community education.
According to Beth Anne Langrell, Executive Director of For All Seasons, “There was an obvious need for services on Tilghman Island. This has been a healthy partnership between the Tilghman community and our agency. We hope to see it grow even more.”

TUMC and Tilghman Island residents have supported the efforts there, donating $25,000 to the church to help start programs and pay for the services for those who do not have insurance or a means to pay. For All Seasons’ recent Heart & Music fundraiser also raised funds. To support For All Seasons work on Tilghman Island, contact Executive Director Beth Anne Langrell at 410-822-1018.

In the future, “Healthy Tilghman” will be partnering with the school and with Project Purple, a substance abuse awareness program to engage our community and youth to stand up against substance abuse.

For All Seasons offers individual and group therapy, general, child and adolescent therapy, marriage and couples counseling, grief counseling, school-based mental health therapy, urgent care services, Rape Crisis Response, Rape Crisis Counseling and Support, 24-Hour English and Spanish Hotlines, and education and outreach programming.

For further information about For All Seasons, call 410-822-1018. For the 24-Hour Crisis Hotline, call Toll-Free: 800-310-7273.

UM Shore Regional Health Welcomes New Board Members

Charles D. “Chip” Macleod

Three local community leaders have recently been appointed to the Board of Directors of University of Maryland Shore Regional Health. Charles “Chip” McLeod and Glenn L. Wilson, both of Chestertown, and Stephen Satchell, of Easton, officially joined the Board in July.

Charles D. “Chip” MacLeod founded MacLeod Law Group, LLC in 2017 with offices in Chestertown and Denton, and a practice representing local governments and related agencies. He is head of the firm’s Local Government Practice Group. He also concentrates in real estate, business and contract law, and serves as general counsel to various non-profit organizations and trade associations. As a registered lobbyist, he advocates for clients before the Maryland General Assembly and Executive branch agencies.

Prior to founding MacLeod Law Group, LLC, MacLeod was a member of Funk & Bolton, P.A. for more than 18 years. He was head of the firm’s Local Government and Real Estate Practice Groups while serving as special counsel to various non-profit organizations and public entities on a broad spectrum of legal matters.

MacLeod also previously served as county administrator of Kent County, Maryland; as a member and chairman of the Board of the former Chester River Health System, Inc.; as a member of the Board of Trustees of the Local Government Insurance Trust (LGIT) and chair of LGIT’s Health Benefits Committee; and associate director of the Maryland Association of Counties. He is a graduate of Washington College and University of Maryland School of Law.

Glenn L. Wilson

Glenn L. Wilson was named president and CEO of Chesapeake Bank & Trust in 2015 after five years as president and CEO of a financial institution in western Pennsylvania that included a $1 billion community bank and $1.8 billion trust company. His career in also banking includes the leadership of Citizens National of Laurel, a top performing bank under Mercantile Bankshares that was later acquired by PNC. He subsequently served PNC as senior credit officer overseeing credit operations in most of Maryland. Other career highlights include serving as past national chairman of the Risk Management Association and as vice-chair of the Pennsylvania Bankers Association and a member of the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia’s Community Institutions Advisory Council.

Wilson’s community involvement has included serving as chair of a local United Way Board in Pennsylvania and as board member for a host of several civic, economic development, and educational organizations. He presently serves as Board chair for the United Way of Kent County and as Board member for Sultana Educational Foundation.

Stephen Satchell is senior vice president and financial advisor for the SRVP Group of Baird Private Wealth Management in Easton. A graduate of Easton High School and Hampden Sydney College, he began his career in finance at Legg Mason in Baltimore in 1992, returning to Easton four years later to focus on wealth management for private clients. He is Series 4,7,63 and 65 registered and is licensed in life, health and long-term care insurance. He presently serves on the St. Johns Foundation Board of Directors and Dave Haslup/Lou Gehrig ASF. His previous Board memberships include the United Fund of Talbot County, Pickering Creek Audubon Center and Talbot Country Club.

Stephen Satchell

Speaking on behalf of the UM SRH Board, John Dillon, chairman, stated: “We are very pleased to have Chip MacLeod, Glenn Wilson and Steve Satchell join us in ensuring that University of Maryland Shore Regional Health will successfully navigate the changing landscape of health care. Their strong personal commitment to the communities we serve, as well as their outstanding professional expertise and accomplishments, make them valuable assets to our efforts going forward.”

In addition to Robert A. Chrencik, CEO, University of Maryland Medical System, and Kenneth Kozel, president and CEO, UM Shore Regional Health, current UM SRH Board members are: from Caroline County, Wayne Howard and Keith McMahan;from Dorchester County, Marlene Feldman, Michael D. Joyce, MD, Richard Loeffler and David Milligan; from Kent County, Myra Butler, Charles B. MacLeod, Charles B. Nolland Glenn L. Wilson; from Queen Anne’s County, Joseph J. Ciotola, MD and Kathleen Deoudes; and from Talbot County, John W. Ashworth,Charles Capute, Art Cecil, John Dillon, Wayne L. Gardner, Sr., Geoffrey F. Oxnam, Stephen Satchell and Thomas Stauch, MD.

“Our board members live and work in our communities. I believe their diverse knowledge and perspectives position us well to achieve our vision of being the region’s leader in patient centered care,” says Kozel.

As part of the University of Maryland Medical System (UMMS), University of Maryland Shore Regional Health is the principal provider of comprehensive health care services for more than 170,000 residents of Caroline, Dorchester, Kent, Queen Anne’s and Talbot counties on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. UM Shore Regional Health’s team of more than 2,300 employees, medical staff, board members and volunteers work with various community partners to fulfill the organization’s mission of Creating Healthier Communities Together.

Debunking the Myths About Foster Parenting in Talbot County

Pictured back row are Jayden Carter and her foster and adoptive parent Glenda Dawson. Seated front row are her other adopted children, left to right, Jeremiah and Jayla Carter.

Talbot County does not have enough foster parent resource homes to accommodate the number of children in need of emergency placement due to unexpected family circumstances. Often, people think there are too many roadblocks to becoming a foster parent and don’t pursue the training and screening necessary to be licensed. Some of the myths surrounding becoming a foster parent are that you need to be married or be a two-parent family; you need to own your own home; you need to have a high income; and you need to have separate bedrooms in your home.

Brandon and Susan Angell with their son Nicholas Angell, along with Paris Quillet, Special Projects Coordinator with the Talbot County Department of Social Services.

According to Paris Quillet, Special Projects Coordinator with the Talbot County Department of Social Services, “Many of these myths keep people from coming to our information sessions to learn more about becoming a foster or adoptive parent. We have foster parents of all races and ethnicities, all religious beliefs, and all sexual orientations. They live in million dollar homes and they live in subsidized housing.”

Glenda Dawson of Easton has been a foster parent for 12 years with the Talbot County Department of Social Services. After raising her own family of four children as a single parent, working two jobs to pay her rent, she discovered Habitat for Humanity and was able to finally purchase her own home. Dawson, who had more love to give, was then licensed as a foster mother to care for her two great nieces and one great nephew. Eventually, through a kinship adoption, she was able to adopt all three children. She continues to provide respite and foster care for the children of Talbot County.

She recalls, “I did this for the love of family and the importance of keeping these children all together as a family.”

She adds, “You just go step by step. If it’s something you really want to do, you go for it. I am proud of what I have accomplished with these children in providing them with a safe and stable home.”

According to Dawson, the support of her extended family and the Department of Social Services has enabled her to manage her second family while continuing to work. Family members help with respite care when she needs a break and the Department helps provide what Dawson needs for the children when things come up. They are also a resource to her for advice and encouragement.

On July 25, 2017 from 5:30 to 7 p.m., the Talbot County Department of Social Services will be hosting an open house for anyone interested in becoming a foster or adoptive parent at its location at 301 Bay Street Unit #5 Easton MD 21601. For further information, call the Talbot County Department of Social Services at 410-820-7371.

 

Talbot Hospice Appoints Five New Board Members

Talbot Hospice board president Diane Rohman recently announced the appointment of five new directors to the board. They include Brenda Forbes-Butler, Liz Freedlander, Roberta Lilly, MD, Rev. Leonard Palmer and Elizabeth Todd. “I am pleased to welcome these new board members as ambassadors for Talbot Hospice,” said Rohman. “We are fortunate and honored to benefit from their time and talents. I am confident that during their tenure they will contribute to the well-being of Talbot Hospice as they help guide our institution through the next several years.”

Brenda Forbes-Butler will be serving a one year term as President of the Festival of Trees. Forbes-Butler is a consumer loan officer with 1880 Bank in Easton. She served as Chair of the Festival of Trees in 2014 and has been a Friends of Hospice board member for three years.

Seated (l-r) Talbot Hospice board president Diane Rohman, Rev. Leonard Palmer, Roberta Lilly, MD; standing (l-r) Talbot Hospice executive director Vivian Dodge, Brenda Forbes-Butler, Elizabeth Todd.

Liz Freedlander was Executive director of Talbot Hospice Foundation for 14 years from 1990 until 2004. During her tenure the Hospice House was constructed and the Pathways pre-hospice, non-medical volunteer program was instituted. Since then she has served as Director of Advancement at The Country School and has been Director of Development at Horn Point Laboratory for the past ten years. She is a registered Fund-Raising Counsel in Maryland and has provided consultant services to nonprofit organizations including the Talbot County Library Foundation, the Maryland Arts Council and Channel Marker. Freedlander is a past president of the board of directors of Hospice and Palliative Care Network of Maryland.

Roberta Lilly, MD is a breast surgeon and the medical director of the Clark Comprehensive Breast Center in Easton. She originally trained in transplant surgery, but after the death of her husband, the need to have more time for her young daughter led her to complete a fellowship in surgical oncology of the breast at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Lilly is board certified by the American Board of Surgeons and is a fellow of the American College of Surgeons. Lilly was honored as a Hometown Hero at the American Cancer Society’s Colors of Cancer in 2015.

Rev. Leonard Palmer is pastor of St. Luke United Methodist Church in Bellevue. He was previously pastor of St. George United Methodist Church in Worton. For the past 14 years, Palmer has been employed by the Department of Social Services in Anne Arundel and Talbot Counties. He is a member of Strengthening the Black Church for the 21st Century task force and volunteers for the Talbot Healthy Communities Coalition and the Mid-Shore Mediation Center.

Elizabeth Todd is currently a Risk Manager with Maryland Medicine Comprehensive Insurance Program. For 16 years prior, Todd was employed by the UM Shore Regional Health System in the Dialysis Unit, the Neurology Unit at the Requard Center for Acute Rehabilitation and as Nurse Navigator at Shore Comprehensive Rehabilitation. She has a Bachelor of Science in Nursing and a Master of Science in Bioethics. Todd’s professional activities include serving as co-chair of the Patient Care Advisory Committee and the Quality and Performance Improvement Council, Rehabilitation Services.

Leaving the board are Jack Anthony, Susan Piggott, Bill Rolle, Adrienne Rudge and Tom Seip. Rohman said, “These directors have brought a wealth of diverse talents and experience as well as passion and commitment to our mission. We were immensely fortunate to have these distinguished community leaders on our board.”

Talbot Hospice Volunteers Honored

Talbot Hospice Volunteers were celebrated and honored at an annual appreciation luncheon held May 10 at Talbot Country Club. Awards were distributed to 49 volunteers with 100 hours or more of service in 2016. First time recipients received the Presidential Service Award. The Distinguished Volunteer Award is given each subsequent year that a volunteer qualifies. All volunteers combined provided a total of 15,042 hours in 2016.

Special Community Partner citations were presented to Talbot Humane and Bayside Quilters Outreach Bee in recognition of their significant contributions during the past year. Talbot Humane is partnering with Talbot Hospice to provide a Pet Loss Support Group every first Thursday of the month and has assisted with pet visits to patients in Hospice House. Members of the Bayside Quilters Outreach Bee create patriotic quilts for Veteran patients as well as banners representing each branch of the service to hang on patients’ doors. They also donate quilts and afghans to other patients.

The annual Volunteer Appreciation Luncheon is funded by the Marita Menzies Endowment Fund, established in 2004 in memory of Marita Menzies, former Talbot Hospice Volunteer Coordinator.

Recipients of the Talbot Hospice Presidential Service and Distinguished Volunteer Awards for 100 hours or more of service in 2016 were recently honored at the annual Volunteer Appreciation Luncheon. Pictured from left to right are Ruth Dominick, Beverley Martin, Sally Woodall, Juanita McLaughlin, Mary Lou Malone, Emma Johnson, Mary Ann Ray, Bev Serio, Nancy Holt, Patti Case, Deborah Pulzone, Gordon Ries, Susan Haddaway, Jean Marvel, Peggy Frampton, Stu Levine, Phyllis Peddicord, Beth Hott, Kathy Unti, Bob Paulus, Emilie Joshi, Mary Ann Huckel, Steve Slack, Anne Slack, Denise Ziegler, Cindy Reed, Janet Granger and Liz Hershey. Not pictured: Jack Anthony, Preston Bascom, Sally Bent, Ginger Bevard, Betty Biliske, Susan Blankner, Sally Blizzard, Natalie Caccia, Alex Collins, Nance DuPont, Kathy Foster, Pat Harden, Suzie Hurley, Florence Lednum, Susan Piggott, Pete Rampmeyer, Adrienne Rudge, Beverly Shea, Brenda Stone, Betty Todd and Michael Tooke.