24-Hour Substance Abuse Textline Launches on the Mid-Shore

The region’s first substance abuse information textline launched today on the Mid-Shore, offering an anonymous way for people to get information about treatment 24-hours a day.

The pilot project is the first of its kind and operates in Caroline, Dorchester, Kent, Queen Anne and Talbot counties. Anyone can text IWIK to 71441 and within minutes will connect with a call center operator. Texters can ask questions and get information anonymously or provide contact information and have a treatment specialist follow-up for further help.

This new platform operates year-round — including nights, weekends and holidays when most substance use disorder services are closed.

Funded through the Mid-Shore Opioid Misuse Prevention Program (OMPP) as part of its media campaign titled, ‘I Wish I Knew’ (IWIK), the textline aims to reduce barriers to treatment and help people understand the treatment process.

“Our team has spent several years researching the opioid crisis here on the Mid-Shore, and we consistently found that people had a hard time getting information on treatment and often didn’t know how to start the process,” said Erin Hill, coordinator for the Mid-Shore OMPP. “We know that the younger demographic prefers texting over phone calls, so we knew this pilot program could really help connect people with life-saving services.”

The Mid-Shore OMPP is a partnership between the health departments of Caroline, Dorchester, Kent, Queen Anne and Talbot. The OMPP team consists of prevention and treatment professionals from each health department, along with a dedicated OMPP coordinator for each county.

The Mid-Shore OMPP also includes a community coalition of more than 100 members including law enforcement, judges, healthcare industry representatives, concerned Mid-Shore residents and more. If you’re interested in joining the coalition, please contact Hill at erin.hill@maryland.gov.

The project is funded through Maryland’s Behavioral Health Administration and SAMHSA.

For more information and for local resources visit www.IWishIKnewMidShore.org.

The Mid-Shore Opioid Misuse Prevention Program (OMPP) is comprised of health departments, organizations and agencies in all five Mid-Shore counties: Caroline, Dorchester, Kent, Queen Anne’s and Talbot. The program is the first collaboration of its kind and focuses on preventing opioid misuse and abuse. The program is supported by SAMHSA and the Maryland Behavioral Health Administration. I Wish I Knew is the program’s media campaign.

Mid-Shore Health Futures: UM Medical System and Shore Health Team Up to Fight Opioid Drug Epidemic

With such successful awareness campaigns as “Talbot Goes Purple” and “Recovery For Shore” events alerting the Mid-Shore community of the dangers and tragedies that come with this unprecedented wave of the opioid abuse creating havoc in rural Maryland, we thought it might be a good time to check in with University of Maryland’s Shore Regional Health, and its parent organization, the University of Maryland Medical System, to understand more about the crisis and more importantly, their approach to education and treatment for those seeking help for themselves or their loved ones.

That gave us the opportunity to spend some time with the University of Maryland’s leading expert on addiction and treatment, Dr. Eric Weintraub, who heads up the alcohol and drug abuse division of the University’s Medical Center, and Donna Jacobs, the MMS’s vice president for community health,to discuss the current state of the epidemic and their community outreach efforts.

One example of that kind of outreach will take place on November 29 at Chesapeake College’s Todd Theatre, and three other locations in Maryland, as hundreds of stakeholders gather to talk at the Not All Wounds are Visible: A Community Conversation about Addiction and Substance Abuse . This event is open to the public and provides an opportunity to hear from and talk to healthcare professionals and community leaders about addiction and substance abuse, including opioid and other drug addictions, as well as recovery programs and strategies.

This video is approximately nine minutes in length. For more information about Not All Wounds are Visible: A Community Conversation about Addiction and Substance Abuse please go here


Mid-Shore Health Futures: Deborah Mizeur on Rural Health Recommendations, Timeline and Vigilance

The last time the Spy checked in with Deborah Mizeur, the co-chair of the State of Maryland’s Rural Health Delivery Workgroup, was when things had just begun to get started. The Workgroup members were approved by Governor Hogan, the Maryland Health Care Commission was assigned to provide staff assistance, and the charge seemed simple enough; oversee a study of healthcare delivery in the Middle Shore region and to develop a plan for meeting the health care needs of the five counties — Caroline, Dorchester, Kent, Queen Anne’s and Talbot.

That was thirteen months ago, and at that time, it was clear that while Mizeur was optimistic, there were many unknowns about whether a very diverse group of well-meaning citizens and professionals with very different philosophies on health care delivery, could come together to form a consensus on rural health on the Eastern Shore and perhaps throughout the state.

The selection of Ms. Mizeur and Joseph Ciotola, the health officer and EMS director for Queen Anne’s County, to co-lead this effort was an inspired one. Both of them seasoned health policy experts who lived on the Mid-Shore, Ciotola an Mizeur worked tirelessly to build consensus with the group as it slowly came to agree on both the Workgroup’s findings, recommendations and a timeline for implantation.

Last week, Deborah took a break from her Apotheosis herb farm kitchen and office to talk to the Spy about where things go after the Workgroup presents its final recommendation to the Governor and Maryland Legislature to consider in the upcoming lawmaking season.

As Mizeur notes in her Spy interview, the Workgroup realized that all of their recommendations could not be done simply with the approval of Annapolis, but instead must be accomplished over the course of years. It was also important to prioritize what had to come first, and the committee was unanimous in wanting two important steps to take place.

The first was for the state to immediately provide incentives for physicians and other health workers to work in rural areas of the state. The second was the formation of regional health collaboratives that would connect all the major private and public health providers in such locations as the Mid-Shore to coordinate and improve services and eventually move forward with the implications of Rural Health Care Complex in the region, which allows residents a “one-stop” shop for their comprehensive health needs. In addition to those primary objectives, the Workgroup was also in total agreement that the hospital  in Chestertown should continue to provide inpatient services as well.

Just those few steps, warns Mizeur, will take the full support of Governor Hogan, the University of Maryland health system, and most importantly the residents and voters of the Mid-Shore to continue to add their voices of support and diligence to make sure all parties keep their commitments.

If that happens, Deborah Mizeur is convinced the the future of healthcare on the Shore can look very bright.

This video is approximately nine minutes in length. To review the Workgroup’s full report please go here. To view the Spy’s first interview with Deborah Mizeur please go here


Film Screenings and Narcan Trainings with TCHD

Three events in Talbot County this month and next offer trainings and free doses of Naloxone, which reverses the effects of an opioid overdose.

The community trainings are part of the recently launched ‘Talbot’s Got Heart’ campaign from the Talbot County Health Department Prevention Office. The next events are set for Nov. 27 at Oxford Volunteer Fire Department; Nov. 29 at Tilghman Island Volunteer Fire Company and Dec. 14 at the Talbot County Free Library, St. Michaels Branch.

Each event includes a screening of the powerful film ‘Written Off,’ which is a powerful documentary that details the life of Matt Edwards, who lost his battle with heroin dependency. The film runs 117 minutes, with training immediately following. Each household trained gets a free overdose response kit that includes a box of Naloxone, which is commonly sold under the brand name Narcan.

“Maryland is on pace for more than 2,000 opioid overdose deaths this year – we’re doing everything we can to slow down those numbers,” said Alexandra Duff, prevention specialist with the health department.

Since June, Duff and her team have trained more than 500 people – 75 of those were in the first month of the campaign.

“Narcan isn’t just for people who have a drug use disorder,” said Duff.“We’re seeing senior citizens overdose after accidentally taking more painkillers than they intended. We’re also hearing about Narcan saving pets that accidentally ingest medications.”

Anyone can get trained and carry the medicine, which is now available in Maryland without a prescription.

The events are free and registration is requested and available at www.TalbotsGotHeart.org.

‘Talbot’s Got Heart’ is in partnership with Mariah’s Mission Fund of the Mid-Shore Community Foundation and the Talbot County Chamber of Commerce, and in coordination with Maryland Heroin Awareness Advocates, Talbot Chapter.

In addition to the community trainings, a ‘Lunch and Learn’ training is scheduled for Nov. 30 at the chamber. Registration is available online at www.talbotchamber.org or by calling the chamber at 410-822-4653.

Training certificates are good for two years. Renewal certificates do require a refresher course.

The Talbot County Health Department Prevention Office helps community groups, agencies and individuals in providing programs and activities to prevent alcohol, tobacco and other drug abuse, and to build a healthier community. Resources include parenting skills, video and resource loan library, awareness campaigns and educational workshops.

 Established in 2014, Mariah’s Mission Fun of the Mid-Shore Community Foundation is a non-profit that provides support groups and resources to empower families and individuals struggling with the effects of substance use disorder. Valerie Albee founded the fund in honor of her daughter, Mariah, who lost her life to heroin.

Maryland Touts new Generic Drug Price-Gouging Law

Following Maryland’s recent efforts as the first state to enact a law that protects consumers from generic prescription drug price-gouging, local leaders and health care advocates on Tuesday highlighted the benefits of the legislation and urged Marylanders to share their personal stories about drug affordability.

The law went into effect Oct. 1 and restricts manufacturers of generic and off-patent prescription drugs from price gouging, or the “excessive and not justified” increase in the cost of a drug, according to a state analysis.

In July, the Association for Accessible Medicines, the trade association that represents America’s manufacturers of generic and biosimilar medicines, filed a lawsuit against Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh and Dennis Schrader, secretary of the Maryland Department of Health, charging that the law was unconstitutional. The association said in July that the law was only protecting high-priced brand name drug companies and punishing lower cost generic alternatives.

In September, a judge rejected portions of the association’s argument and allowed the law to take effect. The association in a statement has said it plans to appeal.

“As a caregiver, prescription drugs are a big part of my life,” said Prince George’s County Executive Rushern Baker in a press release. Baker on Tuesday explained how the law has personally affected him and his family. His wife was diagnosed with early onset dementia and the cost of her medication had shot up from $100 during his earlier pharmacy visits to $300 in recent visits.
“You think about the fact that I have some of the best insurance as county executive. … I have resources, but what happens to somebody that comes in and can’t afford to pay $300?” Baker said.

Generic medications account for 88 percent of drugs dispensed nationally, and 22 percent of generics studied by the Government Accountability Office experienced an “extraordinary price increase” of 100 percent or greater between 2010 and 2015, according to the office of the Maryland Attorney General.

“I take care of patients, not laws,” Dr. Stephen Rockower, past president of MedChi said Tuesday. “My job is to make sure that patients get better, which means patients taking their medicine, and I can’t do my job when they can’t afford their medicine.”

EpiPens and Naloxone are medications that officials have raised concerns about recently — citing prices that rose sharply from October 2013 to April 2014. Prices of EpiPens had a 508 percent increase in price. Naloxone, a medication used to treat opioid overdose — an especially important medication amid the nation’s opioid crisis — increased in price by 553 percent, according to the office of the Maryland Attorney General.

“It’s outrageous that companies can jack up prices like this,” Maryland Citizens’ Health Initiative President Vincent DeMarco told the University of Maryland’s Capital News Service. “This law is a life-saver and we’re confident that the attorney general will continue to succeed in court with this legislation.”

Maryland joined 44 other states on Tuesday in an antitrust investigation of the generic drug industry. They asked a federal court for permission to file a new complaint to increase the number of generic drug manufacturer defendants from six to 16, and drugs at issue from two to 15.

“We have to go after it,” said Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh told Capital News Service. “We’ll see the drug companies collapse and take it to trial.”

Supporters of the legislation urged consumers on Tuesday to submit their stories to www.healthcareforall.com/hearmystory, a new webpage created for the public to share how escalating drug prices have hurt them or their families.

“As legislators, one of the ways we were able to fight was to hear the stories of individuals and repeat them in court by talking to people who could not afford the medicine that they needed,” said state Delegate Ariana Kelly (D-Montgomery). “We need your help to make sure that the legislation works.”

By Georgia Slater

Md. Medical society asks hospitals to review opioid doses

The Maryland State Medical Society is taking action amidst the nation’s opioid crisis and urging hospitals and physicians in the state to decrease the automated controlled-substance standing orders and to prescribe a minimum amount of opioids necessary.

This epidemic is gathering attention in Maryland — Gov. Larry Hogan declared a state of emergency March 1 and committed an additional $50 million over five years to help with prevention.

The number of deaths due to prescription opioids decreased slightly — from 218 to 211— in the first half of this year over the same time period last year, Jan 1. To June 30, according to state health department data released Tuesday.

But the increase in all opioid-related deaths recent years has been sharp: From 2014 to 2017, the number of opioid-related deaths reported in Maryland between Jan. 1 and March 31 more than doubled — taking the death toll up to 473 from 226 three years earlier, according to state health department data.

In response to this crisis, the society, known as MedChi, created an Opioid Task Force to “educate Maryland physicians on safe opioid prescribing practices, how to recognize risk factors, and when to recommend alternative, scientifically-based evidence-based non-opioid treatments,” according to a release earlier this month.

Over the last decade and a half, the amount of opioids prescribed in the United States has risen sharply.

The amount of opioids prescribed per person more than tripled from 1999 to 2015, when the volume of prescriptions reached enough for every American to be medicated for three weeks straight, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The problem may have began in the 1990s when physicians received messages saying they were undertreating pain, said MedChi President Dr. Gary Pushkin.

The “inadequate treatment of pain” was the subject of many policy efforts in the 1990s and among these were the “increased use of opioids for acute pain and the use of long-term opioid therapy for patients with chronic pain,” according to a 2016 paper in the
American Journal of Law and Medicine.

“Doctors do have a role in the whole opioid problem, but I don’t think we are the bad guys that we are painted out to be … a majority of doctors want to do the right thing,” added Pushkin.

Now with the ongoing epidemic and continual increase in opioid prescriptions, MedChi is seeking out these smaller changes with the hopes of a larger impact.

The group is asking that physicians and hospitals review the automated controlled substance “standing orders” that are in the electronic health record systems.

These systems may be creating these standing orders automatically as the recommended dosages — even when lower dosages would be sufficient, Pushkin said.

With this initiative, MedChi is asking that if opioids are being prescribed, hospitals and physicians do not solely rely on auto-populated dosages, and instead they decide which dosage, preferably one that is more minimal, is actually necessary for the pain being treated, explained MedChi CEO Gene Ransom.

Letters have been sent to Maryland hospitals and physicians, according to Pushkin, suggesting that either, “(1) the physicians’ standing orders be reduced to the minimum dosage and quantities necessary or (2) that practices remove any automated dosage and quantity in the …ordering system.”

Ransom said MedChi has received positive responses from hospitals and physicians, and some have begun looking into enacting these changes. Many of them were appreciative that more is being done to try and solve this opioid problem, he added.

“We are very much in line with MedChi’s efforts to reduce standing orders and we know that our efforts can’t just stop there. There are many more measures we have to take on a wider basis for this issue,” Nicole Stallings, Maryland Hospital Association vice president of policy and data analytics told Capital News Service.

The association has been trying to tackle the epidemic for years — in 2015 the group created a set of opioid prescribing guidelines, which included altering standard orders, and 100 percent of Maryland hospital emergency departments signed on to using these guidelines, Stallings added.

Prescribing opioids for too many days and at too high a dose can create a problem, according to the CDC.

Even at low doses, taking an opioid for more than three months can increase the risk of addiction by 15 times, the CDC reported.

A solution may be prescribing for fewer days; for acute pain, prescriptions for three days or fewer is often enough, and more than seven days is rarely needed, according to the CDC.

“This small adjustment could help prevent patients from receiving a higher dosage or quantity than necessary, and may prevent diversion (giving drugs to other people) or other problems,” said Pushkin.

Additionally, many of these opioid prescriptions go unused and are improperly stored in the home, according to a 2017 Johns Hopkins Medicine study.

Dr. Mark Bick, associate professor of anesthesiology and critical care at Hopkins, spearheaded the study and found that 67 to 92 percent of a total of 810 patients did not use their entire opioid prescription, but still held onto them, increasing the risk of misuse.

“Our task force continues to work on solutions to this problem and we are going to keep working on it and are open to more ideas to how this can work better. It’s a common sense solution….If we can reduce just a small number (of deaths) it’s worth it,” said Ransom.

By Georgia Slater
Capital News Service

Talbot County Health Department Prevention Office Launches New Campaign

The Talbot County Health Department Prevention Office has launched a new campaign, ‘Talbot’s Got Heart,’ which includes screenings of the film ‘Written Off’ followed with free Naloxone training and doses at seven locations across Talbot County.

The next event is Wednesday, Oct. 25 at Queen Anne’s-Hillsboro Fire Department. Doors open at 5:30 and the film, which runs 117 minutes starts at 6 p.m., with a 30-minute Naloxone training immediately after. Each person or family trained will receive a free box of Naloxone, which includes two doses, along with a window cling.

Registration is requested and available at www.TalbotsGotHeart.org, along with a complete schedule of events. The events are in partnership with Mariah’s Mission Fund of the Mid-Shore Community Foundation.

Commonly sold under the brand name Narcan, Naloxone is a life-saving medication that reverses an opioid overdose yet has no abuse potential. Available in Maryland without a prescription, side effects of Narcan are minimal and the medication is safe for children and pregnant women.

The film ‘Written Off’ is a powerful documentary that details the life of Matt Edwards, who lost his battle with heroin dependency. ‘Written Off’ is intended to help change the conversation about drug dependency, as told through Edwards’ personal journals. Edwards grew up in Wisconsin and his first high came from a doctor, prescribed for a botched toe surgery.

The film is not yet rated and does depict some drug use and contains some foul language, but there are no age restrictions on attendance. More information is available at www.written-off.com.

In addition to the community trainings, several ‘Lunch and Learn’ trainings are offered for local business owners and employees through the Talbot County Chamber of Commerce.

Those trainings are scheduled from noon until 1 p.m. at the chamber office on Oct. 24, Nov. 8 and Nov. 30. Each session can hold up to 16 people. Registration is available online at www.talbotchamber.org or by calling the chamber at 410-822-4653.

Alexandra Duff, prevention coordinator with Talbot County Health Department administers the trainings. Funding for the Naloxone came from a state grant that provided resources for 266 boxes of the life-saving drug. Those boxes, combined with Duff’s existing supply amounts to 350 boxes available for trainings. With two doses in each box, the trainings will provide 700 free doses for our community.

“Last year in Maryland more than 2,000 people died from an opioid overdose,” Duff said. “This grant and campaign enables us to get 700 doses of this life-saving medicine across our county.”

Trainings include an overview of how to recognize the signs of an overdose; how to respond to an overdose; and how to administer Naloxone.

In addition, each training includes general information on Maryland’s Good Samaritan Law, which protects people who call 911 for an overdose from prosecution for certain crimes, and information on getting Naloxone.

Training certificates are good for two years. Renewal certificates do require a refresher course.

For more information on Naloxone or other substances contact Duff or Kirsten Moore, community health educator at 410-819-5600.

The Talbot County Health Department Prevention Office helps community groups, agencies and individuals in providing programs and activities to prevent alcohol, tobacco and other drug abuse, and to build a healthier community. Resources include parenting skills, video and resource loan library, awareness campaigns and educational workshops.

 Established in 2014, Mariah’s Mission Fun of the Mid-Shore Community Foundation is a non-profit that provides support groups and resources to empower families and individuals struggling with the effects of substance use disorder. Valerie Albee founded the fund in honor of her daughter, Mariah, who lost her life to heroin.

Shore Health: Maryland to Offer Online Shopping Tool for Medical Procedures

The Maryland Health Care Commission, the state’s independent regulatory agency, is unveiling a website on which people scheduling a hip replacement, knee replacement, hysterectomy or vaginal delivery can see price differences among different providers for the same procedure.

The site is launching amid rising health-care costs and as some consumers turn to insurance plans with high deductibles.

The state site is meant to give consumers a tool to compare prices and quality on four common medical procedures at hospitals around the state that patients otherwise would have difficulty finding on their own.

Read the full story in the Washington Post here

Dr. Terry Detrich Joins Bratton Neurocognitive Clinic at Bayleigh Chase

Integrace Bayleigh Chase, a forward-thinking life plan community based in Easton, announces that Terry Detrich, M.D. is joining the Samuel and Alexia Bratton Neurocognitive Clinic on October 2. A neurologist who has practiced in the local community for over 40 years, Dr. Detrich will be joining medical director Allan Anderson, M.D. and nurse practitioner Yvonne Liswell on the clinic team, as it expands its services to provide a more comprehensive approach to supporting families on Maryland’s Eastern Shore living with Alzheimer’s Disease and other neurocognitive impairments.

The addition of Dr. Detrich signifies the clinic’s evolution from traditional memory care to a more advanced and holistic neurocognitive model of care. This model not only focuses on diagnosing and treating impairments associated with memory, but also disorders that present in all five cognitive domains of the brain, including changes in language, motor skills, balance, visual/spatial perception and executive functions.

Dr. Detrich’s specialty in neurology, in collaboration with Dr. Anderson’s specialty in geriatric psychiatry, enables clinic patients to benefit from a multi-disciplinary team utilizing the most advanced diagnostic tools and treatments. Each patient receives a comprehensive evaluation to obtain an accurate and detailed diagnosis, followed by a thorough care plan to optimize quality of life for every individual and their family.

“We are happy and honored to welcome Dr. Terry Detrich to our clinic team, as his expertise and well-respected reputation are unparalleled in our region,” said Allan Anderson, M.D., medical director, the Samuel and Alexia Bratton Neurocognitive Clinic. “It is our priority to continue to expand the services we provide to our greater community, and ensure that families on Maryland’s Eastern Shore have access to the most advanced diagnostics and therapies to help those living with not just memory loss, but all forms of neurocognitive changes.”

“I am thrilled to be working with Dr. Anderson and the Bayleigh Chase team. This is an exciting new direction in my professional career that will allow me to continue to provide care to the greater community in a high-quality patient and caregiver environment,” said Terry Detrich, M.D.

The Samuel and Alexia Bratton Neurocognitive Clinic is located within the Integrace Bayleigh Chase community at 545 Cynwood Lane in Easton. The clinic evaluates individuals on an outpatient basis. For more information or to request an evaluation, please call 410-820-5191.

Located on a 35-acre campus in historic Easton, Bayleigh Chase is a not-for-profit life plan community that affords residents a lifestyle of flexibility and choice to live life on their own terms. Bayleigh Chase offers independent living options in its villas, cottages and apartment homes, as well as a continuum of supportive living services, including assisted living, memory support, outpatient and short-term rehabilitation, skilled nursing and diagnostic and treatment support through the Samuel and Alexia Bratton Neurocognitive Clinic. For more information, please call 410-763-7167 or visit www.bayleighchase.org.

Easton Business Alliance and For All Seasons Kick Off “No Matter What…You Matter”

On October 6, 2017, from 5 to 8 p.m., For All Seasons will kick off its NO MATTER WHAT . . . YOU MATTER Campaign at the Bartlett Pear at 28 South Harrison Street in Easton. The event will include refreshments and live music provided by the Choptank River Big Band. The event kicks off Mental Health Awareness Week (October 7 – 14, 2017) and the launch of For All Seasons new suicide prevention campaign, NO MATTER WHAT…YOU MATTER. The event is part of the Easton Business Alliance’s First Friday stroll through the local galleries and shops.

The Suicide Prevention Campaign was inspired by the soundtrack of the Tony Award winning Broadway musical, “Dear Evan Hansen.” This past spring, Amy Haines and Richard Marks’ Dock Street Foundation invited 40 representatives from several Talbot County service agencies and educational institutions to board a bus bound for NYC to see Ben Platt and the cast of “Dear Evan Hansen.” Both Haines and Marks had seen the play and felt it would be helpful if shared with our local providers of care. They noted, “We were moved and inspired by the relevance and impact of the show particularly as it incorporated social media’s influence on our society and youth. We appreciate For All Season’s leadership and coordination with all agencies in our community assisting our citizens facing mental and emotional challenges.”

For All Seasons Executive Director Beth Anne Langrell shares that returning from the show she knew that Richard and Amy’s gift could last much more than just one day. She thought it offered an opportunity to reach students and those in the community in the same way that the show reached everyone on the trip that day. It was then that For All Seasons decided to begin a new campaign and start a conversation about suicide prevention.

According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) every 13 minutes someone dies by suicide. For every suicide, 25 suicide attempts are made. In addition, 1 in 5 Americans live with a mental health condition.

For All Seasons hopes that by discussing the signs and symptoms associated with suicide that it can raise awareness about the issue in our community. Because family and friends are often the first to recognize the warning signs of suicide, they can be critical to helping an individual find treatment with a provider who specializes in diagnosing and treating mental health conditions.

For All Seasons wants people to know that If they think a friend or family member is considering suicide, they should reach out and start a conversation. Talking openly about suicidal thoughts and feelings can save a life. The following are three steps to help people begin the conversation:

Ask directly – “Are you having suicidal thoughts?” – Let them know you care.
Stay and Listen – Let them share their thoughts and feelings.
Get help – Connect them with a friend, family member or crisis hotline at 1-888-407-8018.

Langrell adds, “The launch of our campaign, No Matter What . . . You Matter will create an ongoing dialogue with agencies and educators who attended the musical, as well as others who are interested in joining the conversation about this growing issue in our community. The campaign will include dialogue circles, educational outreach and community events. We want people to know that no matter what, they matter.

The Easton Business Alliance is participating by donating a portion of their sales on specific dates during Mental Health Awareness Week toward For All Seasons Suicide Prevention Campaign. The following Easton businesses are donating on the dates listed:

Bon Mojo – Friday, October 13, Chef and Shower – Saturday, October 14, Colonial Jewelers of Easton – Friday, October 13, Easton Bowl – Friday, October 13, Harrison’s Wines and Liquors – Wednesday, October 11, Kiln Born Creations – Sunday, October 8, Krave – Friday, October 13, La De Da – Friday, October 13, Levity – Thursday, October 12, Lizzie Dee – Wednesday, October 11, Marc | Randall – Friday, October 13, Nestled Baby & Child – Friday, October 13, Out of the Fire- Thursday, October 12, Rise Up Coffee – Tuesday, October 10, Trade Whim – Friday, October 13, and Vintage Books and Fine Arts – Friday, October 13.

Additional sponsors include Acme, Ashley Insurance, Bartlett Pear Inn, Choptank River Big Band, Doc’s Downtown Grille, Easton Business , Easton Pizzeria, Hair of the Dog, Laser Letters, QATV, Talbot Mentors, Tidewater Inn, Ed & Beth Anne Langrell, Diane Flagler, Mary Wittemann & David Urbani, and Westphal Jewelers.

For All Seasons provides Trauma Certified Individual, Family and Group Therapy; Crisis and Advocacy Services for Adult, Child & Adolescent Victims of Sexual Assault, Rape & Trauma; Adult, Child & Adolescent Psychiatry; Substance Use Disorder Services (in collaboration with Corsica River Substance Use Disorder Services).

For All Seasons offers individual and group therapy, general, child and adolescent therapy, marriage and couples counseling, grief counseling, school-based mental health therapy, urgent care services, Rape Crisis Response, Rape Crisis Counseling and Support, 24-Hour English and Spanish Hotlines, and education and outreach programming. For further information about For All Seasons, call 410-822-1018. For the 24-Hour Crisis Hotline, call Toll-Free: 800-310-7273.


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