Two Boomer Babes Program at Library Canceled Due to Illness

The Talbot County Free Library announced today that the program Radio’s Two Boomer Babes, Kathy Bernard and Barbara Kline, were scheduled to give on Thursday, December 14, in the library’s Easton branch has been canceled due to unforeseen circumstances.  Bernard and Kline regret having to make this change and hope to reschedule their program about their new novel, “Perfectly Seasoned,” soon.

Contact: Sabine Simonson, telephone: 410-822-1626

Upcoming Programming at the Library December 18 to 21

Easton Library Book Group Asks for Help Selecting Titles for 2018

On Monday, December 18, at 6:30 p.m., in the Easton branch of the Talbot County Free Library, the Easton library book group invites patrons to join them for some holiday treats and to help them choose titles to be discussed in 2018.  This event (and this group), like all library programs, is free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register to attend this program.  For more information, please call the library at 410-822-1626, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Bill Peak, telephone: 410-822-1626

Lunch & Learn: Online at Your Library!

On Thursday, December 21, at noon, the Easton branch of the Talbot County Free Library will offer an informational program for patrons on the library’s database services, including online classes, free tutoring, genealogy resources, language learning with Rosetta Stone, magazines, and more.  These service are offered free of charge, 24/7, to all Talbot County Free Library cardholders.  Patrons are invited to bring their lunch.  Coffee and dessert will be provided.  This program is sponsored by the Friends of the Library.  All library programs are free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register to attend this program.  For more information, please call the library at 410-822-1626, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Scotti Oliver, telephone: 410-822-1626

St. Michaels Library to Offer Family Crafts

On Thursday, December 21, at 3:30 p.m., the St. Michaels branch of the Talbot County Free Library will offer a craft program in which children will make a yarn scarf.  All library programs are free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register to attend this program.  For more information, please call the library at 410-745-5877, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Diana Hastings, telephone: 410-745-5877

Easton Library to Hold Board Game Nights for Teens

On Thursday, December 21, from 6:00 – 7:30 p.m., the Easton branch of the Talbot County Free Library will host a board game night for teens.  Teens are invited to bring their own tabletop card and board games or use the library’s Catan, Ticket to Ride, Chess, and more!  This program is for grades 6 – 12.  Light refreshments will be served.  All library programs are free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register to participate in this program.  For more information, please call the library at 410-822-1626, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Laura Powell, telephone: 410-822-1626

Proposed MD Legislation Aims to Stop Online Sex Trafficking

Last year, Maryland had the 13th-most sex trafficking cases in the country with 161, according to the National Human Trafficking Hotline.

This year, the hotline reported 61 sex trafficking cases in this the state as of June 30. Half of the incidents involved a minor, and about 84 percent included a female victim.

A House Energy and Commerce hearing Thursday examined legislation that would close loopholes in federal law that critics fear has allowed pervasive online sex trafficking.

Under current law, the Communications Decency Act does not hold online services liable for content that secondary users publish. Sites such as Reddit, Facebook and YouTube are not responsible for vile material that its commenters post in a thread or comment section.

Rep. Ann Wagner, R-Missouri, introduced the “Allow States and Victims to Fight Online Sex Trafficking Act” earlier this year to make it easier for states to prosecute websites that facilitate sex trafficking. The measure also would give victims the right to sue such sites.

The bipartisan measure has 171 House co-sponsors, including Maryland Reps. Andy Harris, R- Cockeysville, and Anthony Brown, D-Largo.

A member of the committee, Rep. John Sarbanes, D-Towson, said in a statement that human trafficking inside and beyond the United States “is a scourge on society that preys on our most vulnerable. We must do everything we can to curb trafficking in all its forms, including sex trafficking online.”

“If Congress establishes a real tool to ensure that businesses cannot commit crimes online that they could never commit offline, fewer businesses will enter the sex trade, and fewer victims will ever be sold and raped,” Wagner said in her testimony.

Yiota Souras, senior vice president for the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, said that over the past five years, 88 percent of the center’s reports concerned online sex trafficking. He said roughly 74 percent of the center’s reports came from Backpage.com, a website that offers advertisements for dating, services and jobs, among other resources.

The ranking Democrat on the committee, Michael Doyle of Pennsylvania, citing a Senate report, asserted that Backpage’s owners were aware of the sex trafficking taking place, and even encouraged sex-trafficking advertisers to falsify their postings to hide their true intentions.

Souras added that children online may be seeking attention that they are not receiving at home, and are vulnerable to false promises made by predators online.

“That’s probably how they are lured, they’re seeking the smallest remnant of kindness from someone,” Souras said. Online predators are manipulative and know how to extend that branch of kindness to their victims, she added.

Still, Eric Goldman, a law professor at Santa Clara University, said in his testimony that Wagner’s measure would “reinstate the moderator’s dilemma,” which forces websites to decide whether to exercise full editorial discretion, or none at all.

Goldman added that leaving this discretion to websites could inadvertently increase online sex trafficking because it may be more favorable to leave users’ content entirely unchecked.

Goldman also expressed concern that punishing these sites differently at the federal and state levels could damage the integrity of the Communications Decency Act, which he dubbed “one of the most important policy achievements of the past quarter-century.”

Rep. Pete Olson, R-Texas, said he saw firsthand the lasting impact sex trafficking can have on victims.

While in South Africa, his daughter was rushed by three men – one of whom brandished a pistol – but she was saved when one of the men yanked her backpack from her shoulder instead of grabbing her, he said.

The congressman’s voice quivered as he recounted her experience.

Although she escaped, Olson said, she “has not been the same.”

“(Sex traffickers) are devils, absolute evil devils,” he added. “This has to stop.”

Even if the law is changed, Souras said she knows that an online marketplace for sex trafficking will likely remain. But she said she believes that the issue is rectifiable.

“It’s important that there be a professional approach to this,” Souras said. “Sex trafficking is a multifaceted problem, it requires a multifaceted solution.”

 

By Conner Hoyt And Michael Brice-Saddler

 

Christmas in St. Michaels Weekend Coming Up!

Christmas in St. Michaels festivities kick off December 2nd with the Gingerbread House Preview Cocktail Party from 5-7 PM at the Women’s Club of St. Michaels located on St. Mary’s Square.  The Gingerbread House competition is open to anyone. Tickets for the Cocktail Party and complete contest rules are available online at christmasinstmichaels.org.  Awards will be announced at the Preview Cocktail Party.

The following Friday, Dec. 8th, put on your dancing shoes and join the fun at The Yuletide Party, starting at 6:30 pm at the Miles River Yacht Club.  All of the ingredients are in place for a spectacular event: there will be an open bar, passed hot hors d’oeuvres, a carving station of pork and beef tenderloin and desserts.  In addition, there will be a raw bar with a selection of seasonal specialties gathered from the Bay.  Guests will also enjoy complimentary valet parking.  And you won’t be able to stay off the dance floor when Joe Martone strikes up the music starting at 8 PM. Tickets are required.

Mr. and Mrs. Claus wow the crowds along Talbot St. at the annual St. Michaels Christmas Pa-rade December 9th from 10 a.m. – 11 a.m.

On Saturday, Dec. 9th, gather the whole family for the Christmas Parade which steps off on Talbot Street at 10:30 a.m.  For parents with younger kids, there is a pre-parade Breakfast with Santa, held at Harrison’s Eastern Shore, 1216 Talbot Street.  Tickets are $10.00 and reservations are required. After the parade, kids ages 3-11 can head over to Santa’s Wonderland, located at the St. Michael’s School, 200 Seymour Ave for face painting, games and – for baseball lovers – a maybe even a visit with major league baseball star and St. Michael’s native Harold Baines.

For lovers of historic homes,  the signature event of the weekend is the popular Christmas in St. Michaels Tour of Homes.  Eight historic and significant homes, all decked out for the holidays,  will be open to the public from Dec. 9th 11 a.m. – 5 pm. and Dec. 10th 11a.m. – 4 PM.  On the tour for the first time this year is the elegant brick colonial style Cannonball house which earned its nickname after being hit with a cannonball during the War of 1813.   Evidence is still visible in the stairwell.  All of the homes located in town are within walking distance of each other and transportation is provided to outlying locations.  Tickets for the Tour of Homes are $25.00 until Dec. 8th.  After that, tickets are $30.00. Tickets can be purchased on line or in local stores.

And finally, you can finish up (or get started on!) your Christmas shopping at the Marketplace and Sweet Shop, located at the Granite Lodge on St. Mary’s Square.  Filled with an array of artful gifts including hand-etched wine glasses, hummingbird feeders, fine jewelry, cuddly scarves and gloves plus homemade jams, jellies, and other gourmet goodies, Marketplace has something for everyone on your list.

To purchase tickets, make reservations, and find out more about these and other events, please visit:  christmasinstmichaels.org. All proceeds from Christmas in St. Michaels events go to fund local non-profit organizations that provide important services for local residents.

New Weather Station Helps Students Learn at CBMM

A new, in-the-water weather station has recently been installed at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum on Fogg’s Cove along the Miles River.

Made possible through a generous gift from Lesley and Fred Israel, the weather station allows CBMM to enhance its K-12 programming to better support science and environmental education. Using the weather station, students are able to monitor the water quality at CBMM remotely from their schools to extend their museum learning into the classroom.

The monitoring equipment and data compilation are provided by the Virginia-based Sutron Corporation, which specializes in high quality real-time hydrologic, meteorological, and oceanic data. Water temperature, salinity, turbidity, and alkalinity are measured in the water, along with wind direction and speed, rainfall, dewpoint, and barometric pressure from the sensor above. Real-time data from CBMM’s weather station can be accessed online at bit.ly/weatherstationmap.

Established in 1965, the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum is a world-class maritime museum dedicated to preserving and exploring the history, environment, and people of the entire Chesapeake Bay, with the values of relevancy, authenticity, and stewardship guiding its mission. Charitable gifts to the museum’s annual fund enable CBMM to educate and inspire the next generation of Chesapeake Bay stewards, and can be made online at cbmm.org/donate.

Upcoming Programming at the Library December 11 to 16

Easton Library to Offer Needlework Program

On Monday, December 11, from 3:00 – 5:00 p.m., the Easton branch of the Talbot County Free Library will once again offer its popular Stitching Time program.  Patrons are invited to work on their favorite project with a group.  Limited instruction will be available for beginners.  Newcomers welcome.  All library programming is free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register for this program.  For more information, please call the library at 410-822-1626, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Chris Eareckson, telephone: 410-822-1626

Children to Read with a Certified Therapy Dog at Easton Library

On Tuesday, December 12, at 4:00 p.m., the Easton branch of the Talbot County Free Library invites children 5 and older to bring in their favorite book or choose one from the library’s shelves to read with Janet Dickey and her dog Latte.  All library programs are free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register to participate in this program.  For more information, please call the library at 410-822-1626, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Laura Powell, telephone: 410-822-1626

Story Time

On Wednesdays, December 13, January 24, and February 14 & 28, at 10:30 a.m., the St. Michaels branch of the Talbot County Free Library will offer a story time program for children 5 and under accompanied by an adult.  All library programs are free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register to participate in this program.  For more information, please call the library at 410-745-5877, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Diana Hastings, telephone: 410-745-5877

St. Michaels Library to Host Bay Hundred Chess

On Wednesdays, December 13 & 27, January 10 & 24, and February 14 & 28, from 1:00 – 3:00 p.m., the St. Michaels branch of the Talbot County Free Library invites patrons to come in to learn and play the time-honored strategic game of chess.  Beginners welcome.  All library programs are free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register to participate in this program.  For more information, please call the library at 410-745-5877, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Shauna Beulah, telephone: 410-745-5877

St. Michaels Library to Offer Minecraft

On Wednesdays, December 13, January 10 & 24, and February 14 & 28, at 3:30 p.m., the St. Michaels branch of the Talbot County Free Library invites children 5 and older to explore the world of Minecraft on the library’s computers.  All library programs are free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register to participate in this program.  For more information, please call the library at 410-745-5877, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Diana Hastings, telephone: 410-745-5877

St. Michaels Library to Host Memoir Writers

On Thursdays, December 14 & 28, January 11 & 25, and February 8 & 22, from 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m., the St. Michaels branch of the Talbot County Free Library invites patrons to record and share their memories of life and family with a group of friendly, like-minded people.  Participants are welcome to bring their lunch.  All library programs are free and open to the public, but patrons are asked to pre-register for this program.  For more information, please call the library at 410-745-5877, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Shauna Beulah, telephone: 410-745-5877

St. Michaels Library to Offer Family Games

On Thursday, December 14, at 3:30 p.m., the St. Michaels branch of the Talbot County Free Library invites patrons to bring the whole family to the library for an afternoon of board games and fun educational children’s games.  This program is for all ages, but children 5 and under must be accompanied by an adult.  All library programs are free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register for this program.  For more information, please call the library at 410-745-5877, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Diana Hastings, telephone: 410-745-5877

L-R Barbara Kline & Kathy Bernard

Children to Decorate Cookies at Easton Library

On Thursday, December 14, from 3:30 – 4:45 p.m., the Easton branch of the Talbot County Free Library invites children of all ages to stop in and decorate cookies.  First come, first served!  All library programs are free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register to participate in this program.  For more information, please call the library at 410-822-1626, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Laura Powell, telephone: 410-822-1626

Two Boomer Babes to Discuss Their Debut Novel: “Perfectly Seasoned”

On Thursday, December 14, at 6:30 p.m., in the Easton branch of the Talbot County Free Library, Radio’s Two Boomer Babes, Kathy Bernard and Barbara Kline, will talk about the genesis of their debut novel, “Perfectly Seasoned,” storyline and character development, the writing process, finding a publisher, and the joys of becoming first-time authors a bit later in life.

Having spent the last decade hosting and producing their nationally syndicated, award-winning program, “2BoomerBabes Radio Hour,” Bernard and Kline have combined all that they have learned from their own life experiences and the thousands of interviews they’ve performed to write a novel, under the pen name Sarah-Jane Berklin.

All library programs are free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register to attend this program.  For more information, please call the library at 410-822-1626, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Sabine Simonson, telephone: 410-822-1626

Easton Library to Feature Steel Drums Program

On Saturday, December 16, at 1:00 p.m., the Easton branch of the Talbot County Free Library will host a steel drum program for children of all ages.  Patrons will have the opportunity to listen to steel drum music, hear the history of the instrument, and learn to play a complete song during this interactive program sponsored by Young Audiences of Maryland and Rockcreek Steel Drums.  All library programs are free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register to attend this program.  For more information, please call the library at 410-822-1626, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Laura Powell, telephone: 410-822-1626

Bay’s Oyster Aquaculture Harvest Closing in on Wild Fishery

More than a century after the first oysters were planted on a Virginia bar, aquaculture has firmly taken hold in the Chesapeake Bay. The value of Virginia’s oyster farms production has eclipsed the public fishery, and many oyster experts believe Maryland is heading in the same direction.

As of last year, 173 Maryland oyster farmers have leased more than 6,000 acres of the Bay and its tributaries, all of which are actively producing oysters. Harvest from those leases yielded almost 65,000 bushels in 2016 — an increase of 1,000 percent since 2012. In the meantime, Maryland’s public oyster harvest, suffering from mediocre to poor reproduction since 2010, saw its harvest drop 42 percent in 2016 to about 224,000 bushels.

“Each year for the past five, lease numbers and acreage have risen along with aquaculture harvest, while public harvest numbers declined,” said Donald Webster, a University of Maryland aquaculture specialist. “This year and next will be very difficult for the public fishery and, frankly, I doubt it will ever recover to amount to anything again.”

Oyster aquaculture in Maryland wasn’t always destined for success. Jon Farrington has been growing oysters in Southern Maryland for about 10 years and has experienced changes in the state’s permitting process, as well as methods for oyster production, that have moved the state’s aquaculture industry past its rocky start.

Farrington left his aerospace engineering job in 2006 to try growing oysters in a Calvert County cove. One of only six oyster farmers in the state at that time, Farrington was battle-tested with the various bureaucracies that needed to sign off on permits to grow shellfish. When the state changed its laws in 2009 to allow oyster farming in every county, Farrington was first in line to apply for his second lease. He was hoping the new law would mean quicker approvals, more encouragement for watermen to enter the field and less resistance from shoreline property owners who don’t want cages and floats disrupting their view.

The law helped, and so have changes in the oyster farming process. But those changes took years. Now, nearly a decade later, Maryland has a $5 million aquaculture industry that has created close to 500 jobs in coastal areas, according to state figures, and shows little signs of slowing down.

Oyster aquaculture in Virginia is still far ahead, with $18.5 million in oyster sales in 2016. But Maryland aquaculture has definitely gotten its sea legs.

“I kind of thought maybe it would happen a little bit faster than it has,” said Farrington, who sells his oysters directly to restaurants. He also has a hatchery operation, selling “seed” oysters to fellow farmers. “On the other hand, the market has developed a lot more strongly than I had probably expected back then. All in all, I’d say, Maryland’s done a pretty good job.”

Several factors propelled aquaculture forward in Maryland after more than a century of resistance to the idea. First, more oyster farmers are raising “triploids,” sterile oysters bred from the Bay’s native species, Crassostrea virginica. Because they don’t expend energy on reproduction, triploids can grow to market size twice as fast as wild oysters — 18 months in Maryland waters, as opposed to three years for traditional oysters. In Virginia’s saltier water, they grow even faster.

Also, new techniques and equipment have made it more efficient: floating up-weller systems, which help seed oysters feed on plankton and grow more quickly, and a pulley system from Australia that rotates cages to reduce fouling and labor.

Many oyster farmers also find themselves in the equipment business; they can’t locate a cage or float that works in their location, so they make their own, and then other farmers want it. For years, Farrington sold a device called the Revelation that rotated oysters. Another oyster farmer, Johnny Shockley in Dorchester County, sells systems for cleaning and shaping oysters.

The state tackled bureaucratic hurdles for lease applicants. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources now coordinates the review process, sparing applicants the complexities of what used to be a multi-agency gamut.

At the federal level, oyster farmers complained that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which required a separate permit, put them through duplicative reviews, so there too the processed was streamlined. Leases generally take six months to be issued now, instead of a year or more, said Karl Roscher, the DNR’s aquaculture manager.

Roscher’s office has added staff to speed application processing, which is helpful, as his office has received more than 50 new applications in recent months. Also crucial, according to fisheries director David Blazer, is an online mapping tool that allows an oyster farmer to see if there are potential obstacles to getting a lease in a particular location. For example, if the proposed lease is on top of a public oyster bar or a well-worked clamming area, the state won’t approve it.

Money and training have helped, too. About 80 percent of the leases are worked by a spat-on-shell method, where watermen let larvae set on natural oyster shell and reach a certain size before moving them to bags or containers on the bottom. Webster, with help from University of Maryland Sea Grant, has been training watermen how to set oysters. The number of prospective oyster farmers seeking training has grown from six in 2011 to 45 last year.

Since 2011, the Maryland Agricultural and Resource-Based Industry Development Corp. has approved $3 million in shellfish aquaculture loans to help growers acquire the needed equipment. The fund, known as MARBIDCO, originally prioritized loans to traditional watermen who were new to aquaculture. But MARBIDCO has since helped plenty of non-watermen, like Farrington and fellow Southern Maryland oyster farmer Patrick Hudson. The loans are low-interest and, if the borrower makes all of the payments, MARBIDCO forgives 25 percent of the principal.

Hudson, who was on his way to law school when he made a U-turn into the oyster business, said the MARBIDCO loan was critical. Banks, he said, aren’t inclined to lend tens of thousands of dollars for a start-up oyster enterprise.

“You have to buy cages and oysters before you sell anything. You need at least a million seed. And then you sit on it for a year and a half,” Hudson said. “Being able to pay just a couple hundred dollars a month was critical. Otherwise, you’re just leaving oyster aquaculture to the really rich people.”

For decades, that’s what watermen feared: that large seafood companies would gobble the leases, while the workers struggled. That has not come to pass. In several cases, watermen have become equity partners in oyster farms. Eric Wisner, a waterman, has about 500 acres under lease in the Nanticoke River. Ted Cooney, who owns Madhouse Oysters on Hoopers Island, has two watermen partners.

Cooney, who came to oyster farming after a career in healthcare financial services, said he’s pleased that the state is encouraging aquaculture. But the process still has problems. Almost three years ago, he applied for two leases in the Honga River; the state recently told him he couldn’t have one because it’s too close to a hunting blind.

“I was out of the swing of the gun, as far as I could tell, [but] two and a half years later, they tell me no. They should have told me 60 days after I applied,” he said. “In that time, I could have applied and already gotten another lease.”

Roscher said the goose blind didn’t show up on the state’s siting tool, so staff had to take measurements in the field.

Tension still occurs between user groups. While public oyster areas are generally established, clam beds and pound net locations are more intermittent. A few years ago, an Eastern Shore delegate introduced a bill in the legislature that would have made farming in clamming areas more difficult; the bill didn’t pass, so clammers and oyster farmers compromised, and the state promised to delineate clamming areas so farmers could avoid them.

Some influential property owners are still flexing their muscles, but Roscher noted that many of those efforts fail. Dialogue, he said, is far preferable to long lawsuits or boutique legislation. Last year, influential property owners in St. Mary’s County persuaded a state delegate to introduce a bill restricting oyster farms at historic sites; that bill, which was specific to the viewshed at Sotterley Plantation and Historic St. Mary’s City, died.

Roscher said that the public relations and bureaucratic problems are surmountable. What worries him is a shell shortage. The state and University of Maryland have grown oysters on alternative substrates built from granite and concrete, but they’re much harder to harvest from.

“There are a lot of different ways to grow an oyster,” Farrington said. “People are still trying to figure out what works best for their application, but as they do, we’re really going to see some production grow in the next couple of years. It’s still a relatively young industry, and people are really dialed in.”

Bay Journal staff writer Rona Kobell is a former Baltimore Sun reporter.

Redistricting Reform in Maryland: Gerry Be Gone!

“Maryland is considered one of the more blatantly gerrymandered states. A federal judge wrote that the 3rd District, held by Democratic Rep. John Sarbanes, was ‘reminiscent of a broken-winged pterodactyl, lying prostrate across the center of the state.’ ”  Baltimore Sun, July 16, 2017

“Gerrymandering, in a word, is why American democracy is broken.”  The Washington Post, Feb 10, 2017

So just what is gerrymandering? How is it practiced in Maryland?  How does it affect you??? The League of Women Voters of the Mid-Shore is hosting a series of public information sessions on Redistricting Reform in Maryland to answer these questions and to learn more the issues, current proposals for reform from the Governor’s commission, and what the Tame The Gerrymander coalition is doing to push for reform.  This is part of a continuing series on Making Democracy Work.  Learn how you, too, can make a difference!

Join the discussion on Saturday, Dec. 2, 2017 from 11-12:30 pm in Cambridge and Saturday, Dec. 9 from 11-12:30 pm in Easton; each session will be held in the community meeting room at the main library (303 Gay St in Cambridge and 100 W. Dover St in Easton).  Light refreshments will be served.

For more information, contact lwvms.md@gmail.com or call 443-646-3338.

Holy Trinity’s Christmas Bazaar

In conjunction with Oxford’s Christmas on the Creek, The Holy Trinity Christmas Bazaar will be held on Saturday, December 2nd from 9AM to noon in the Parish House.

Featured items will include decorated mini trees , handmade jewelry, beautiful notecards, holiday greeting cards and more.  Edible goodies will also be available –cookies, candies, frozen soups, appetizers and other holiday yummies.  Traditional favorites include decorated wreathes, Christmas flowers and beeswax candles blessed by Father Kevin.  New this year are beautiful gold Angels handcrafted by Holy Trinity parishioners.

Raffle tickets for seasonal themed baskets will be available during the Bazaar.  The drawing for these delightful creations will be held at the conclusion of the Bazaar.

Shoppers can relax before and after shopping in our Café, with complimentary hot coffee or cider and baked goods.

Proceeds from the Bazaar help fund Holy Trinity’s Mission projects. Major credit cards will be accepted.

Annual Christmas in St. Michaels Yuletide Party December 8th

L-R: Yuletide Party Co-Chair Susan Thomas, Christmas in St. Michaels President, Pat Martin and Yuletide Party Co-Chair Barbara Rose.

Don’t be fooled by the unseasonably warm weather – the holiday season will be here before you know it!  So, dust off your dancing shoes, get out your festive clothes and mark your calendar for the annual Christmas in St. Michaels Yuletide Party, Friday, December 8th at Miles River Yacht Club, St. Michaels, MD Friday, December 9th from 6:30 – 11 PM.  Tickets are $150.00 ($65.00 is tax deductible) and are available at http://www.christmasinstmichaels.org.

“This is a wonderful way to kick off the holiday season,” said Yuletide Party Co-Chair Barbara Rose.  “The club will be beautifully decorated and there will be plenty of room for everyone to mix, mingle, enjoy themselves.”

Indeed, all of the ingredients are in place for a spectacular event: there will be an open bar, hot passed hors d’oeuvres, a carving station of pork and beef tenderloin and desserts.  In addition, there will be a raw bar with a selection of seasonal specialties drawn from the Bay.  Guests will also enjoy complimentary valet parking. Plus, you won’t be able to stay off the dance floor when Joe Martone strikes up the music starting at 8 PM.

All proceeds from Christmas in St. Michaels go to support local non-profits that provide much needed services to local residents.  For more information on this and other Christmas in St. Michaels events, please visit:  christmasinstmichaels.org.