Londonderry Breaks Ground on New Clubhouse

More than 200 people showed up to  Londonderry on the Tred Avon in Easton on Tuesday, May 2, 2017, to celebrate the groundbreaking of the community’s new clubhouse.

Complete with food, drinks and a band ¾ all with a Jimmy Buffet theme ¾ the event was a party for both current and future residents. Priority List members, or those looking to move to Londonderry, were included in the celebration so they could get a glimpse of what they have to look forward to.

“I had not been to any social affairs there yet, but it was very nice,” said Ruth Dominick, a Londonderry Priority List member who attended the celebration with her husband, Walter. “They keep us in the loop with reports and their newsletter, so it’ll be easy to move over.”

As for the new clubhouse, it’s been designed by Easton architecture firm Atelier 11. It boasts a number of new amenities for residents, including rooms for meetings and lectures, a yoga studio, a workout room with fitness equipment, a spa area for residents to have their hair and nails done, an art studio, a shaded garden and larger outside deck, and a kitchen and living room area for residents who may want to entertain larger parties.

Lauren Dianich, principle architect from Atelier 11, said the goal was to make the space very flexible so it could meet a variety of needs for Londonderry’s very active residents.

“We thought what would serve them well was a more informal setting,” Dianich said. “The whole senior time of life is very cool when you live at a senior community ¾ there’s people around your age, with your interests. It’s great.”

The clubhouse, which will move forward with Willow Construction, LLC, also of Easton, will be built as a one story, but has been designed to hold a second floor in the future should the need arise. The design also features a tower as its focal point, tying the new structure into the existing landscape by mirroring a windmill near the water at Londonderry.

The hope is for the clubhouse to serve as the heart and center of the community, and the new tower will make it even easier for residents to find. Dianich said she thinks it even brings character to the building.

“This is going to be a really neat jump forward,” Dianich said. “I think it’s representative of how vital Londonderry has become to this area.”

Londonderry on the Tred Avon is an intimate residential cooperative community for adults ages 62 and up, offering a variety of housing options from convenient apartments to spacious cottages among 29 acres, including 1500 feet of waterfront shoreline. For more information, visit www.londonderrytredavon.com.

Talbot Hospice Receives Hospice Honors Award

Talbot Hospice was recently named a recipient of HEALTHCARE first’s fifth annual Hospice Honors.  This prestigious annual review recognizes hospices providing the highest level of quality as measured from the caregiver’s point of view. HEALTHCARE first is the leading provider of web-based home health and hospice software, billing and coding services, and advanced analytics.

“It is such an honor to receive this recognition,” said Executive Director Vivian Dodge. “The award is based on feedback from our families and is a reflection of the compassionate care and services provided by Talbot Hospice staff and volunteers.”

Award criteria were based on Hospice CAHPS (Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems) survey results for the period of October 2015 through September 2016. Recipients must achieve a score that meets or exceeds the national average on 20 of the 24 quality indicator measures on the caregiver’s satisfaction questionnaire.

Talbot Hospice was founded in 1985 and is the provider of hospice services for Talbot County. For more information about hospice programs and services call 410-822-6681 or visit TalbotHospice.org.

Talbot Hospice Offers Drop-in Bereavement Sessions

Talbot Hospice will offer a new drop-in grief support group this summer for anyone in the community who has lost a loved one, regardless of whether they were served by Talbot Hospice. The sessions will be held the 4th Tuesday of each month from 5 – 7 p.m. Dates for the drop-in group are May 23, June 27, July 25, August 22. All Talbot Hospice bereavement support groups are offered free of charge. For more information contact Bereavement Coordinator Becky DeMattia at 410-822-6681 or bdemattia@talbothospice.org.

Rock the Block for Talbot Hospice

Talbot Hospice will host its 2nd Annual Rock the Block Street Party on June 2, from 7-10 p.m., in front of Pope’s Tavern in Oxford. Proceeds will benefit patients and families. Bring your lawn chair and enjoy tasty light fare while rocking to the tunes of Mike Hines & The Look. This high energy dance bank plays R & B, hip hop, pop and old school funk along with a small taste of Motown and disco.

New this year is a Wall of Wine and Silent Auction. A sampling of auction items includes a Pet Package featuring a portrait of your favorite furry friend by local artist Patti Fisher and other treats; a Personal Package complete with hair, nails and massage certificates; and a Sports Package with golf for four at the Hyatt, lunch and golf items.

Tickets are $65 per person and can be purchased at TalbotHospice.org/events.Questions? Contact Katie Schroeder at kschroeder@talbothospice.org or 410-822-6681.

Inside the Sandwich: Easter Baskets to Camp Tee Shirts By Amelia Blades Steward

I never have transitioned from one season to the next on time. My friends laugh about the year the Christmas tree stayed up until Valentine’s Day (it was real, not artificial) and they had to practically do an intervention to get me to take it down. This year, I didn’t even get my Easter decorations out. The snowman on the sideboard got taken down in early April and replaced by two Beatrix Potter figurines and a small basket of Easter eggs that I got for my birthday in March.

It is how I have approached the “things” in my life too. Not always being ready to part with the memories attached to the items I have collected over the years. This week, however, that sentimental streak paid off when I found an old camp tee shirt and jacket that I wore at age 14 while attending Wye Institute, a camp held at Aspen institute in Queenstown, MD in the 1970s and 80s. I looked for the camp clothing because Aspen is doing a documentary on Arthur Houghton and Wye Institute and had called me about being interviewed as a camper. Houghton, the president of Steuben Glass in New York, had founded the Wye Institute camp for gifted and talented adolescents from rural areas to expand their intellectual and creative minds. I viewed it as perfect timing, as did Aspen, when I brought the tee shirt and jacket to the documentary taping.

The green and white striped camp-issued cotton tee shirt brought me back to a time and place in my life when the ground shifted and something changed in me, something that changed my view of the world. It was the summer of 1974 when I attended the month-long camp at Wye Institute with other 8th graders from Maryland’s Eastern Shore and New York’s Finger Lakes region. We would be attending high school in the fall. We all wore the same camp uniforms. The only time we didn’t wear our camp clothes were when we went to bed each night and could wear our own pajamas. My bunk-mates and I talked late into the night about world peace, women’s lib and what we were going to do with our lives.

As campers we studied and discussed classic literature, film and theater, learning about how these things have shaped our country’s foundation. We explored art, music, creative writing, and the environment – learning how to sail on the Wye River and attending our first theater production of the play “Godspell” in Washington, DC. We even participated in social experiments. One experiment had half the group paint their faces in wild colors and shop in nearby Centreville, while the other half of the group without the painted faces shopped in the same shops. I was in the group with the painted faces and we were run out of the shops we went in.

At Wye Institute I realized that I wanted to be a writer. For the first time, I participated in a creative writing class and learned the power of the pen. The camp showed me that I could illicit a reaction from the words that I wrote. My peers responded to the words and that was powerful. It was a summer when we all learned we had opinions and that our voices could be heard.

We had debates and studied rhetoric. We even put on the musical, “The Fantasticks,” for our parents when they came to visit us mid-month. It was the first time many of us had been away from home and from our parents for this length of time. After leaving camp that summer, I remember how different I felt when I got home. I had been transformed somehow and knew that I would approach high school in a new anticipatory way.

Now, as I think about summer approaching, I wonder if my own college-aged son will one day remember working as a camp counselor, experiencing wet sleeping bags from summer thunderstorms, chiggers and poison ivy, lost bathing suits, glorious camp productions, and the tears of campers saying good-bye to new friends. While memories like these linger for all of us, we are forced to move ahead to the next chapter of our lives. Ready or not, the season is changing. I just need to find where I put that box of Easter decorations before Memorial Day arrives.

 

Senior Nation: Coping with Stress by Kim Huff

The body deals with stress by using the flight or fight response. When the body senses something stressful, hormones are released that initiate physiological responses known as the stress response. Long term activation of the stress response decreases the efficiency of the immune system and increases the risk of physical and cognitive diseases.

Lifestyle changes associated with age can create stressful challenges such as:

    • Coping with medical conditions such as heart disease, diabetes and arthritis, chronic pain, cancer or Alzheimer’s disease
    • Physical and cognitive changes associated with aging that limit functional mobility and intellectual processes respectively
    • Retirement is a time of relaxation, however changes in lifestyle and financial status can initiate stress that can carry over into long term stress.
    • Becoming a caretaker for a friend, neighbor, or loved one or losing a friend or loved one

Signs of short term or chronic stress include:

      • Worry, anxiety, or panic attacks
      • Sadness or depression
      • Feeling pressured, hurried, helpless or overwhelmed
      • Irritability and moodiness
      • Difficulty concentrating and making decisions
      • Stomach problems, headaches, chest pain, asthma, skin rashes
      • Problems sleeping
      • Drinking too much alcohol, smoking, or misusing drugs
        Changes in eating habits

The following are suggestions for managing stress:

        • Give back to the community by volunteering to enhance self-esteem and reduce stress.
        • Participate in regular exercise, eat right, and maintain a healthy weight.
        • Refer to problems as “challenges” that can be overcome instead of adopting a feeling helplessness
        • Spend time with friends and family. Social relations help with adjusting to changes such as retiring, moving, and losing loved ones.
        • Learn and use relaxation techniques and meditation.
        • Make use of support and education groups, as well as respite care, which provides time off for caregivers.

For more information on the stress response and coping with stress go to the American Psychological Association’s website apa.org or consult a medical professional.

Kimberly Huff is the fitness director at Heron Point of Chestertown

Homestead Manor Hosts Talk on Early Detection of Alzheimer’s and Dementia

Homestead Manor will host a lecture by Jennifer L. FitzPatrick in late April on, “Know the 10 Signs: Early Detection Matters Alzheimer’s and Dementia” This presentation is designed for individuals who are interested in learning more about Alzheimer’s and dementia, anyone who is experiencing memory loss or other warning signs that might indicate a problem, and individuals who are worried about a family member or friend presenting possible symptoms.

When: Thursday, April 27, 2017
Where: Homestead Manor, 410 Colonial Drive Denton, Md
Time: 1:00 Pm – 2:00 Pm Presentation, Light Refreshments
Why: Learn More About Alzheimer’S And Dementia
Who: Everyone, Also Social Workers Will Earn Ceu’S

Call Now and RSVP 410-479-2273

 

Annapolis: Generic Drug Price Gouging could be Penalized In Bill Sent to Hogan

A prohibition on generic drug price gouging now heads to Gov. Larry Hogan’s desk for signature after the House concurred in Senate amendments Monday morning.

The House voted 137-2 for the bill, HB631, and the Senate approved it on Friday 38-7 with a handful of Republicans joining the Democratic majority. All but a few GOP delegates supported the measure.

The legislation would be the first of its kind in the country to hold drug makers accountable for drastic spikes in prices that can’t be justified. Under the new law, the state Medicaid program will notify the attorney general of a spike in drug prices, who can seek civil penalties of up to $10,000 per violation.

“Generic prescription drugs prices have been like the ‘wild’ west for many Americans” said Vincent DeMarco, president of the Maryland Citizens’ Health Initiative, moments before Friday’s vote. “There’s a new sheriff in town and his name is Attorney General Brian Frosh, who will protect Marylanders from price gouging, and this will also allow future AG’s to protect Marylanders.”

“Frosh will be able to take legal action to stop unconscionable price increases that hurt people without justification when there’s no competition in the market,” DeMarco said.

Subjective judgment

In floor debate Friday, Sen. Robert Cassilly, R-Harford, said the proper way to deal with price controls would be to set up a commission rather than allow the attorney general to make a “subjective” determination on what constitutes price gouging.

“If the state of Maryland wants to establish their own version of the FDA and engage in price controls we ought to do in the proper manner,” Cassilly said. “The proper manner would be set up some proper board or commission…or have it come under some aspect of our state bureaucracy.”

Senate Republican Whip Sen. Stephen Hershey. R-Queen Anne’s, said the law could actually harm competition.

“Generic drugs are one of the only indicators in the delivery of health care where prices are actually going down,” Hershey said prior to passage of the bill. “This bill is going to have a negative effect that could potentially eliminate some of the competition that is in Maryland and that is driving these costs down.”

The legislation was rolled out at a Jan. 10 rally in Annapolis three weeks after Maryland joined 19 other states in a lawsuit against six generic drug makers for market manipulation and anti-competitive behavior.

Frosh said a 2014 survey of pharmacists revealed that 25 “off patent” generic drugs saw price increases of 600% to 2000%.

He said normally prices “plummet” when patents expire and competition becomes “robust.” He said generic drugs have consistently run about 20% of the original patented price.

“What we allege is these companies conspired to fix prices.” Frosh said at the rally.

by Dan Menefee

Shore Neurocognitive Health Opens in Easton

Shore Neurocognitive Health is pleased to announce the opening of their new office, specializing in dementia and anxiety/depression disorders affecting the older adult. Our services include memory disorders screening, psychotherapy, caregiver support and education and behavioral management training. Professional services include education and evidence-based staff training programs for organizations providing care to the older adult.

Located in Easton, Maryland, Shore Neurocognitive Health is directed by Beth Parker-O’Brien, LCSW-C, MSW, who has over 25 years in the field. “I am excited to be able to continue providing care and services to the Eastern Shore community. Our new office offers a unique opportunity to provide even more personalized care.” says owner Beth Parker-O’Brien. Shore Neurocognitive Health looks forward to continued collaboration with local providers and organizations to assist in providing comprehensive care to individuals, families and caregivers facing the challenges of dementia.

Now accepting patients, Shore Neurocognitive is located at 29466 Pintail Drive #9, Easton, Maryland.

Visit SNhealth.net. For more information, or call (443) 746-3698.

Talbot Hospice Hires Bereavement Coordinator

Talbot Hospice Executive Director Vivian Dodge recently announced the appointment of Rebecca DeMattia, LCSW-C as Bereavement Coordinator. As a licensed certified social worker and certified grief counselor, DeMattia has been providing grief counseling since 2007. In her role as Bereavement Coordinator, she will be responsible for the supervision of and overall management of a bereavement program including the planning, implementation of grief support to patients and their families, caregivers, hospice staff, and the community at large.

DeMattia has a bachelor’s degree in Psychology and a master’s degree in Social Work, both from Salisbury University. She received her Certification in Grief Counseling from the American Academy of Grief Counseling in 2012 and is currently working toward a doctorate in Social Work. She is a member of the National Association of Social Workers.

“We are very pleased to have found someone with Becky’s background and enthusiasm to steer our bereavement program,” said Dodge. “She has great ideas for new programming, and has already proven to be an asset to our team and to our patients and family members.”

Quote from Becky:

“I look forward to immersing myself in the culture of Talbot Hospice and providing the important support that is needed by patients and their loved ones who are facing this sacred chapter of life,” said DeMattia.

Talbot Hospice offers individual and family consultation as well as a number of support groups that meet on a regular basis.  Services are offered without charge and are made possible through charitable donations. Bereavement services are offered to anyone, regardless of county of residence, whether or not their loved one was served by Talbot Hospice. For a complete listing of groups offered visit TalbotHospice.org or call 410-822-6681 for more information.