Londonderry Residents Learn About Soils, Archaeology

Londonderry on the Tred Avon residents were recently treated to a lecture on soil science and archaeology by Dr. J.E. Foss, professor emeritus at the University of Tennessee.

Presented at the end of May, the program was titled “Soils and Archaeology: From Pompeii to Guatemala,” and gave residents a look at a number of archaeological sites Foss has had the opportunity to work at as a soil scientist. Over the past 30 years, he’s worked to help do things like date sites and examine contamination in places like Puerto Rico, Central America, Italy, Jordan, Albania, Tunisia and Greece.

Londonderry resident Dr. J.E. Foss is pictured atop a Mayan temple in Guatemala with fellow researchers.

“Soils are different all over the world,” Foss, a Londonderry resident of about six months, said. “I bounced around quite a bit.”

Foss’ work has taken him to sites both commonly heard of, like Pompeii, and those less name recognizable, like Mitrou and Petra. Though some of the residents at Foss’ lecture had actually visited Pompeii themselves — he calls them a “well traveled group” — they still showed a lot of interest in the historical aspects of his presentation.

“They were especially interested in the Mayan sites in Guatemala, El Mirador,” Foss said. “Everyone has a natural interest in archaeology — where do we come from, what’s the history, that sort of thing.”

Foss hopes to organize a trip in the future for residents to visit an active archaeological dig. He says he’d also like to present other lectures specific to some of the interesting sites he’s worked.

Londonderry on the Tred Avon is an intimate residential cooperative community for adults ages 62 and up, offering a variety of housing options from convenient apartments to spacious cottages among 29 acres, including 1500 feet of waterfront shoreline. For more information, visit www.londonderrytredavon.com.

Child Loss Support Group Partners with Talbot Hospice

Beginning June 21 the Child Loss Support Group will hold its monthly sessions at Talbot Hospice for anyone dealing with the loss of a child of any age. Ongoing sessions will be held the 3rd Wednesday of each month at 6 p.m. at 586 Cynwood Drive. Summer dates are July 19, August 16 and September 20. The group sessions are free of charge and open to the public.

The Child Loss Support Group was founded in 1986 by Talbot Hospice volunteers Betts Guthrie, Millie Parrott, Rhonda Higginbottom and community members Rob and Lynn Sanchez following the loss of their 8-year-old son Rion. Higginbottom, who served as the group’s facilitator for more than 30 years, retired in January. “It seemed like a natural fit for Talbot Hospice to take on the Child Loss Support Group,” Sanchez said. “In fact, the group started at Talbot Hospice, and it has now come full circle going back there.”

The transition officially took place on June 3rd when the Child Loss Support Group held its annual Celebration of Life commemorating Mother’s Day and Father’s Day. The ceremony is held each year at the Healing Garden, located at the entrance of The Easton Club.The garden was established in 1998 by Child Loss Support Group members as a memorial to their children and a place to remember, meditate and pray. Butterflies are released at the Celebration of Life as a symbol of hope and new life.

“The death of a child is a special kind of loss and leaves parents and families feeling confused, vulnerable and fragile,” said Talbot Hospice Bereavement Coordinator Becky DeMattia. “The support group provides a safe place for parents to share and heal, and will focus on the special needs of parents, the grief experienced, the secondary losses, the impact on families, marriages, siblings and how to create meaningful rituals to honor the child’s life. Rob, Lynn and Rhonda have lovingly cared for this group for many years, and we are honored to bring the child loss group to our program”

For more information on the Child Loss Support Group or any Talbot Hospice bereavement session, contact Becky DeMattia at 410-822-6681 or bdemattia@talbothospice.org. A complete list of grief support groups can be found at TalbotHospice.org/programs/bereavement.

 

Senior Nation: Growing Old and Loving It by Dodie Theune

Editor’s Note. Dodie Theune is a resident of Oxford, adjunct faculty member of Temple University, and CEO of Coaching Affiliates. She was the keynote speaker at last week’s Senior Summit for the  Mid-Shore region. We have reprinted her address in its entirety.

Today I hope to encourage you to reimagine how growing old could be different than what we have come to expect. To do that, we need to let go of the old paradigms for aging and create a new vision for our future. No matter where we have been or what we have done or left undone…we can still reimagine our life in what I call “Our Third Act.”

You are never too old to become the person you were meant to be. And that’s what your Third act could be about…becoming the person you were meant to be.

We hear more and more about the “The Graying of America.” The median age of Americans is going up and the population is getting older. We are now the fastest growing segment and that gives us clout in many areas, especially in the voting box. And The Eastern Shore is a perfect example of this phenomenon. In fact, by 2020, we expect that more than 40% of the population of Talbot County will be over age 65!

Today we will take a look at what we can accomplish with this new-found power.

I remember Turning 65. There were a whole lot more candles on the cake. More small lines showed up around my eyes. I remember looking down at my hands and saying, “These are not my hands…These are my mother’s hands.”

I am more than a little stiff now getting up in the morning. I sometimes forget the names of people I know quite well. And I hardly ever remember the titles of books I’ve read and movies I’ve seen. And there are times when I walk into a room and wonder what I was looking for? These are all reminders that I am “gettin’ on in years.”

Turning Sixty Five is a big milestone for us. We send each other funny cards and tell jokes. We celebrate with cake and coffee at work. We have special parties. And we get a kick out of wearing black armbands at 65th birthday parties.

But the truth is that underneath all that playfulness, there is a clear aversion to getting older. And that is not good because when we resist the idea of aging, we are also saying NO to what is possible…saying NO to all that is new and wonderful about this truly unique and special time of life, Our Third Act.

We have, most of us, grown up with what I call the old paradigm of aging, You know what I mean: “Old Age Ain’t No Place for Sissies”, “Getting old is a bitch.” These deep-rooted bromides are what I call: Limiting Beliefs about Aging.

Beliefs are important because they determine our attitudes about everything. And our attitudes are what drives our behavior.

Think about that for a minute.

Limiting beliefs will influence us to have negative and self-defeating attitudes about our future. And since attitudes drive our behavior, we are then more likely to give in to aging, to give up, and to submit to the old expectations about getting old. If that becomes our attitude, we will be guaranteeing that ours will be a future with little if any possibilities.

I’d like to tell you a little bit about my own “growing older” story. I was 70 and teaching at Temple University in Philadelphia when I realized that I needed hearing aids. Mind you, I already had reading glasses. So off I went for the inevitable hearing test. I had to laugh as I remembered my mother saying…first the eyes…then the ears. I am now adding…then the feet!

To tell the truth I hated wearing those hearing aids. The little buds that went inside my ear tickled and I was constantly fussing to see if they were in place. And then one day, I turned on the ignition in my car and my hearing aids buzzed. I said out loud “This is getting ridiculous!”

I can laugh at it now but back then I was really annoyed. It was right around then that we had one of our family dinners. In fact, I think it was Mother’s day. I admit I was complaining more than just a little about those darn hearing aids when one of my daughters came over and put her arm around me and jokingly said, “It’s ok Mom. You’re just getting ‘OLDE’. I was speechless for a moment as I looked at her with amazement and then I said “I’M NOT OLDE… Grandpa…He’s OLDE!!”

So just what is OLDE? Johnny Carson said “Old is 10 years older than you are now.” We like that definition of course because according to Johnnie, we never ever actually get olde, we just age a little more.

My daughter meant well and she probably didn’t realize that what she was actually doing was expressing the old paradigm for aging. You know the one.

It’s often depicted as an Arch. You’re young…you’re middle aged and supposedly at your prime and after that, it is all downhill. We really must change that depiction because it fosters negative thoughts and limiting beliefs.

I prefer to show the life cycle as a straight line to demonstrate a new paradigm for aging: a new vision for “growing old and loving it. ”First there is your younger self…followed by your middle aged and older self … and then you shift into what I am now calling Your Third Act.

We can and should look forward to our Third Act with a curiosity for what could be possible. And anything is possible when you give yourself the opportunity to use your Third Act as a springboard to becoming the person you were meant to be.

When I was 65, It never occurred to me that I would be here with all of you talking about how much I love being 77. I am in the throes of My Third Act and I have not peaked yet! In fact, last winter I spent 30 plus days downhill skiing and I am skiing better than ever. I am truly blessed.

As we age, it is critical that we be authentic. We should tell the truth about ourselves and have some fun doing it. Life is so much easier when we learn to be authentic. Aging actually gives us permission to be who we really are. How refreshing is that?

We can spend time with the people we like especially the ones who make us laugh. And we should definitely find things to laugh about. We can always find something to worry about.

While I was preparing for this morning, I asked my husband if he could give me an example of a time when we laughed at ourselves. Guess what he said? Every day. We find things to laugh about ourselves and each other ….every single day.

I recently saw a post on facebook of a white haired woman dancing the high step and wearing the most outlandish hat and an equally outlandish red and white polka dot dress with lots of ruffles. The caption read: “It’s better to have a sense of humor than no sense at all”

It is extremely important as we enter our Third Act, to let go of the past. Forgive and forget. Life is too short and we just do not have the time to harbor a grudge. In fact, it is exhausting. I saw a poster recently that said: “The best revenge is to be happy.”

And absolutely…we should have no regrets. What’s the point after all? What’s gone is gone. What’s lost is lost. The past is the past.

Our friends have a really wonderful tradition for letting go of the past. All year long, they write down their regrets and then on New Year’s Eve, they make paper boats out of those lists of regrets and gather with other families at a small lake nearby. They line up the boats at the shoreline and light each one with a match and float the burning boats out into the darkness. And then they are free to celebrate a New Year. They have learned to be in the present by torching the past.

It is also important that while we are learning to be authentic, and letting go of the past, we must also learn to give ourselves permission to reach out and ask for help. Remember, ‘no one ever said that growing older would be easy.’ In fact, it takes a great deal of courage! Much too often, our genes disappoint us as we age and for some of us, the Third Act may become an overwhelming challenge.

We recognize that many of our Talbot County seniors are in need of support and encouragement, especially when they are suffering from pain, or financial distress or grieving for a lost loved one. Facing an uncertain future requires enormous courage.

That is precisely why we are here today at the Second Annual Senior Summit. Talbot Community Connections and the Talbot County Department of Social Services are hoping that by sharing information about the right tools and the assistance that is available, our seniors can approach their Third Act with more confidence and ease. Today is all about learning that Aging in Talbot County need not be scary. We can indeed, grow old and love it.

I launched my Third Act by retiring to St Michaels. I told my friends that I would be taking a year to settle in and that I would be nesting, testing and resting. Anyone who has downsized will understand what having ‘layered furniture’ means. I spent endless days unpacking and running to the thrift shops and rummage sales.

Testing was the most fun. I looked around town for ways that I could match my experience and skills with a need in the community. To fill a gap, if you will. I knew it would certainly be easy to be busy. There are endless possibilities for volunteering. But I was, after all, in my Third Act and I was looking for a way to experience what I saw as a profound new vision for myself…“to grow old and love it.”

That’s when I discovered the Academy of Life Long Learning. When I was a young mother I saw a poster at the library that read: “Live today as if it were your last and seek after knowledge as if you will live forever.”

I absolutely believe that anyone who stops learning will get old while someone who keeps learning will stay young. I have become a great proponent of lifelong learning. Malcolm Boyd, an Episcopal priest and Poet-in-Residence at the Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles wrote that “Aging… requires learning. God knows it requires wisdom. It can be an enormous blessing because it serves to sum up a life, lend it character, underscore its motivation. Finally, it prepares the way for leave-taking.”

I AM a life long learner. I finished my undergraduate degree when my children were grown and then went on to earn my Masters in Adult Education. I received my PhD just 7 years ago and it took me more than 5 years to earn that degree.

So, when I discovered the Academy of Life Long Learning. I was really excited . I took several fascinating courses and then came up with the Idea of creating a course about my favorite subject: growing old and loving it. Facilitating that course was an extremely fulfilling experience. Actually it was a joy. I was in my Third Act and doing something I truly loved. And here I am today.

In one of the workshops at the Senior Summit, we will hear a discussion about reimagining your life. It is possible, you know…to reimagine your life …no matter what your current circumstances may be. A technique for reimagining your life is to ask yourself : What will be my life story; What legacy do I want to leave?

When you were younger and busy raising families and building careers, you may have wanted to do more but just didn’t have the time. Now that you have the time, what dream can you follow? And for you younger folks, now is your chance to do what you can with what you’ve got in the direction of your dream and begin to write that story.

The motto for Talbot Community Connections is “Filling the Gap.” What gap can you fill? What can you do to make a difference? You might think about what makes you mad or sad about what’s going on in the world? Is there an organization or group you can support that’s doing work you think is important. Is there one small thing that you can do to make a difference.

My neighbor is passionate about the environment. When she walks through our town, she always stops to pick up cans, and plastic bottles and puts them in the recycle bin. She then started cleaning up the recycle areas in town. In fact she would even bring back trash that wasn’t recyclable and put it in her own trash bin. She was living her passion about the environment. Eventually, she was successful in getting curbside recycle service in St Michaels. Wherever she goes, she makes a difference. Ann Hymes is living proof that small things, done consistently, in strategic places can reap huge results.

Remember: you are never too old to become the person you were meant to be, and it’s never too late to envision yourself acting out your passion in your third act.

Senior Nation: Second Senior Summit Highlights

When it comes to caring for Talbot County’s seniors, Talbot Community Connections (TCC) is leading the charge. Responsible for the second annual senior summit, held at the Talbot County Community Center; 48 vendors and sponsors informed the public on topics such as quality in-home care, dementia, and scam avoidance.The public attended workshops showing disadvantages seniors face daily, along with discussions to stay fit and healthy. Raising seven grand their first year, TCC helps fund Easton’s Child Advocacy Center.

TCC was founded in 2001, focusing on safety, health, and well-being of Talbot County children and adults. This non-profit organization receives grants allowing them to donate to the Department of Social Services for several programs including Backpacks for Children, Dad’s Class, and the Foster program. TCC envisions furthering education on senior care for their third annual senior summit but until then; they are grateful to their volunteers and sponsors who help make these events possible.

This video is approximately one minute in length. For more information about Talbot Community Connections please go here.

Integrace Bayleigh Chase Dedicates Barry Library

On May 25, Integrace Bayleigh Chase held a special celebration to dedicate the Barry Library. The library is now named for Mrs. Jean Barry, a current Bayleigh Chase resident who was instrumental in conceiving, designing, and establishing the library for Bayleigh Chase residents and guests to enjoy. The dedication commemorated the fifth anniversary of the library’s opening. Pictured left to right: Integrace Bayleigh Chase Executive Director Andrea Lev; Jean Barry; and Resident Association President Anne Ryan Neary.

About Integrace

Integrace is a forward-thinking non-profit organization that strives to ignite in all people the passion for meaningful living. Integrace oversees a family of vibrant retirement communities throughout Maryland, including Bayleigh Chase in Easton, Buckingham’s Choice in Adamstown, and Fairhaven in Sykesville. Integrace is also a nationally-recognized leader in the art of dementia care, with the Sykesville-based Copper Ridge community and Integrace Institute, as well as two memory clinics in Easton and Sykesville, serving as catalysts to a profound shift in how we perceive, and relate to, those living with dementia. Integrace communities provide a continuum of services to support both residents and the greater community, including assisted living, skilled nursing, short-term rehabilitation and more. Each of these innovative programs focuses on person-centered living, honoring the abilities, possibilities and authenticity of each individual. For more information, please visit Integrace.org.

Talbot Hospice Volunteers Honored

Talbot Hospice Volunteers were celebrated and honored at an annual appreciation luncheon held May 10 at Talbot Country Club. Awards were distributed to 49 volunteers with 100 hours or more of service in 2016. First time recipients received the Presidential Service Award. The Distinguished Volunteer Award is given each subsequent year that a volunteer qualifies. All volunteers combined provided a total of 15,042 hours in 2016.

Special Community Partner citations were presented to Talbot Humane and Bayside Quilters Outreach Bee in recognition of their significant contributions during the past year. Talbot Humane is partnering with Talbot Hospice to provide a Pet Loss Support Group every first Thursday of the month and has assisted with pet visits to patients in Hospice House. Members of the Bayside Quilters Outreach Bee create patriotic quilts for Veteran patients as well as banners representing each branch of the service to hang on patients’ doors. They also donate quilts and afghans to other patients.

The annual Volunteer Appreciation Luncheon is funded by the Marita Menzies Endowment Fund, established in 2004 in memory of Marita Menzies, former Talbot Hospice Volunteer Coordinator.

Recipients of the Talbot Hospice Presidential Service and Distinguished Volunteer Awards for 100 hours or more of service in 2016 were recently honored at the annual Volunteer Appreciation Luncheon. Pictured from left to right are Ruth Dominick, Beverley Martin, Sally Woodall, Juanita McLaughlin, Mary Lou Malone, Emma Johnson, Mary Ann Ray, Bev Serio, Nancy Holt, Patti Case, Deborah Pulzone, Gordon Ries, Susan Haddaway, Jean Marvel, Peggy Frampton, Stu Levine, Phyllis Peddicord, Beth Hott, Kathy Unti, Bob Paulus, Emilie Joshi, Mary Ann Huckel, Steve Slack, Anne Slack, Denise Ziegler, Cindy Reed, Janet Granger and Liz Hershey. Not pictured: Jack Anthony, Preston Bascom, Sally Bent, Ginger Bevard, Betty Biliske, Susan Blankner, Sally Blizzard, Natalie Caccia, Alex Collins, Nance DuPont, Kathy Foster, Pat Harden, Suzie Hurley, Florence Lednum, Susan Piggott, Pete Rampmeyer, Adrienne Rudge, Beverly Shea, Brenda Stone, Betty Todd and Michael Tooke.

Senior Nation: Mid-Shore Senior Summit 2017 with Amy Steward and Ruth Sullivan

The aging process doesn’t have to be a daunting one. That’s what Talbot Community Connections leaders Amy Steward and Ruth Sullivan leaders say as they prepare for the TCC and Talbot County Department of Social Services’ second annual Senior Summit next week.

As Amy and Ruth point out in their Spy interview, getting older, or taking care of an aging parent, doesn’t need to be stressful if one has the right tools and resources. The Senior Summit will include workshops on downsizing and move, safe driving, prescription drug misuse, nutrition and yoga, financial planning for retirement, medical planning, and advanced directives, self-defense for seniors, and finding your balance.

In addition to break-out workshops, there will be the opportunity for participants to have lunch and to visit vendor tables to gather additional information on aging issues and services.

This video is approximately two minutes in length. For more information please go here.

Named “Growing Older and Loving It,” on Thursday, June 8, 2017, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Talbot Community Center on Route 50 in Easton, MD. This day-long program for seniors, children of seniors, caregivers, professionals and concerned citizens will provide presentations and discussions on the issues that seniors face today. The cost of the Senior Summit is $10 for seniors (age 60+), $45 for the general public $85 for professionals.

Londonderry Breaks Ground on New Clubhouse

More than 200 people showed up to  Londonderry on the Tred Avon in Easton on Tuesday, May 2, 2017, to celebrate the groundbreaking of the community’s new clubhouse.

Complete with food, drinks and a band ¾ all with a Jimmy Buffet theme ¾ the event was a party for both current and future residents. Priority List members, or those looking to move to Londonderry, were included in the celebration so they could get a glimpse of what they have to look forward to.

“I had not been to any social affairs there yet, but it was very nice,” said Ruth Dominick, a Londonderry Priority List member who attended the celebration with her husband, Walter. “They keep us in the loop with reports and their newsletter, so it’ll be easy to move over.”

As for the new clubhouse, it’s been designed by Easton architecture firm Atelier 11. It boasts a number of new amenities for residents, including rooms for meetings and lectures, a yoga studio, a workout room with fitness equipment, a spa area for residents to have their hair and nails done, an art studio, a shaded garden and larger outside deck, and a kitchen and living room area for residents who may want to entertain larger parties.

Lauren Dianich, principle architect from Atelier 11, said the goal was to make the space very flexible so it could meet a variety of needs for Londonderry’s very active residents.

“We thought what would serve them well was a more informal setting,” Dianich said. “The whole senior time of life is very cool when you live at a senior community ¾ there’s people around your age, with your interests. It’s great.”

The clubhouse, which will move forward with Willow Construction, LLC, also of Easton, will be built as a one story, but has been designed to hold a second floor in the future should the need arise. The design also features a tower as its focal point, tying the new structure into the existing landscape by mirroring a windmill near the water at Londonderry.

The hope is for the clubhouse to serve as the heart and center of the community, and the new tower will make it even easier for residents to find. Dianich said she thinks it even brings character to the building.

“This is going to be a really neat jump forward,” Dianich said. “I think it’s representative of how vital Londonderry has become to this area.”

Londonderry on the Tred Avon is an intimate residential cooperative community for adults ages 62 and up, offering a variety of housing options from convenient apartments to spacious cottages among 29 acres, including 1500 feet of waterfront shoreline. For more information, visit www.londonderrytredavon.com.

Talbot Hospice Receives Hospice Honors Award

Talbot Hospice was recently named a recipient of HEALTHCARE first’s fifth annual Hospice Honors.  This prestigious annual review recognizes hospices providing the highest level of quality as measured from the caregiver’s point of view. HEALTHCARE first is the leading provider of web-based home health and hospice software, billing and coding services, and advanced analytics.

“It is such an honor to receive this recognition,” said Executive Director Vivian Dodge. “The award is based on feedback from our families and is a reflection of the compassionate care and services provided by Talbot Hospice staff and volunteers.”

Award criteria were based on Hospice CAHPS (Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems) survey results for the period of October 2015 through September 2016. Recipients must achieve a score that meets or exceeds the national average on 20 of the 24 quality indicator measures on the caregiver’s satisfaction questionnaire.

Talbot Hospice was founded in 1985 and is the provider of hospice services for Talbot County. For more information about hospice programs and services call 410-822-6681 or visit TalbotHospice.org.

Talbot Hospice Offers Drop-in Bereavement Sessions

Talbot Hospice will offer a new drop-in grief support group this summer for anyone in the community who has lost a loved one, regardless of whether they were served by Talbot Hospice. The sessions will be held the 4th Tuesday of each month from 5 – 7 p.m. Dates for the drop-in group are May 23, June 27, July 25, August 22. All Talbot Hospice bereavement support groups are offered free of charge. For more information contact Bereavement Coordinator Becky DeMattia at 410-822-6681 or bdemattia@talbothospice.org.