Talbot Hospice Hires Bereavement Coordinator

Talbot Hospice Executive Director Vivian Dodge recently announced the appointment of Rebecca DeMattia, LCSW-C as Bereavement Coordinator. As a licensed certified social worker and certified grief counselor, DeMattia has been providing grief counseling since 2007. In her role as Bereavement Coordinator, she will be responsible for the supervision of and overall management of a bereavement program including the planning, implementation of grief support to patients and their families, caregivers, hospice staff, and the community at large.

DeMattia has a bachelor’s degree in Psychology and a master’s degree in Social Work, both from Salisbury University. She received her Certification in Grief Counseling from the American Academy of Grief Counseling in 2012 and is currently working toward a doctorate in Social Work. She is a member of the National Association of Social Workers.

“We are very pleased to have found someone with Becky’s background and enthusiasm to steer our bereavement program,” said Dodge. “She has great ideas for new programming, and has already proven to be an asset to our team and to our patients and family members.”

Quote from Becky:

“I look forward to immersing myself in the culture of Talbot Hospice and providing the important support that is needed by patients and their loved ones who are facing this sacred chapter of life,” said DeMattia.

Talbot Hospice offers individual and family consultation as well as a number of support groups that meet on a regular basis.  Services are offered without charge and are made possible through charitable donations. Bereavement services are offered to anyone, regardless of county of residence, whether or not their loved one was served by Talbot Hospice. For a complete listing of groups offered visit TalbotHospice.org or call 410-822-6681 for more information.

Connolly Joins Londonderry Board

Charles C. Connolly III recently joined the Board of Directors at Londonderry on the Tred Avon.

Connolly has been the Director of Finance for Talbot County Public Schools since July 1990.

A graduate of Wilmington College with Bachelor of Business Administration and Master of Business Administration degrees, he is a certified public accountant. He began his career farming with his parents before moving on to C.W. Amos & Company, a certified public accounting firm, working his way up to become a manager in the regional office.

Connolly serves as a liaison and trustee for Maryland Association of Boards of Education Group Insurance Pool, Maryland Association of Boards of Education Workers Compensation Fund, Maryland Association of Boards of Education Legal Services Association, Eastern Shore of Maryland Education Energy Trust and Maryland Association of Counties OPEB Trust. He is a member and serves on boards of various non-profit organizations throughout Talbot County.

A Talbot County native, he and his wife Mollie, a teacher for Talbot County Public School for 37 years, are planning for their daughter Keegan’s upcoming wedding in July. Connolly enjoys riding motorcycles, woodworking, making children’s toys and assisting with his wife and daughter’s scarf manufacturing and sales business.

Londonderry on the Tred Avon is an intimate residential cooperative community for adults ages 62 and over, offering a variety of housing options from convenient apartments to spacious cottages among 29 acres, including 1500 feet of waterfront shoreline. For more information, visit www.londonderrytredavon.com.

Integrace Bayleigh Chase Participates in The Senior Expo

Representatives from Integrace Bayleigh Chase, a forward-thinking life plan community based in Easton, were happy to participate in The Senior Expo, sponsored by The Star Democrat, on March 22 at Chesapeake College.

Dr. Allan Anderson, medical director for the Samuel and Alexia Bratton Memory Clinic at Bayleigh Chase, was a featured speaker at the event. He presented “Maintaining Brain Fitness,” sharing a basic overview of how the brain processes memory, and expert tips for keeping our minds healthy as we age.

Lauren Harding, Assisted Living and Memory Care Admissions Director, and Dr. Allan Anderson, Medical Director, represented Integrace Bayleigh Chase at The Senior Expo at Chesapeake College.

Integrace Bayleigh Chase also had a booth at the event, where guests were able to learn more about the continuum of innovative services – including independent living, assisted living, skilled nursing and short-term rehabilitation – Bayleigh Chase provides for both residents and the greater community.

“We received so many phone calls leading up to The Senior Expo from people who were excited to hear Dr. Anderson speak, we knew this event would be a success,” said Betsy Griffin, Advertising and Marketing Director, The Star Democrat. “We thank both Dr. Anderson and Integrace Bayleigh Chase for being a part of this great day for our community.”

Located on a 35-acre campus in historic Easton, Bayleigh Chase is a vibrant community that offers residents a lifestyle of flexibility and choice to live life on their own terms. For more information, please call 410-763-7167 or visit www.bayleighchase.org.

About Integrace

Integrace is a forward-thinking non-profit organization that strives to ignite in all people the passion for meaningful living. Integrace oversees a family of vibrant retirement communities throughout Maryland, including Bayleigh Chase in Easton, Buckingham’s Choice in Adamstown, and Fairhaven in Sykesville. Integrace is also a nationally-recognized leader in the art of dementia care, with the Sykesville-based Copper Ridge community and Integrace Institute, as well as two memory clinics in Easton and Sykesville, serving as catalysts to a profound shift in how we perceive, and relate to, those living with dementia. Integrace communities provide a continuum of services to support both residents and the greater community, including assisted living, skilled nursing, short-term rehabilitation and more. Each of these innovative programs focuses on person-centered living, honoring the abilities, possibilities and authenticity of each individual. For more information, please visit Integrace.org.

Londonderry Residents Model Latest Fashions

Residents and staff members from Londonderry on the Tred Avon walked the catwalk on Tuesday, March 7, 2017, showing off their biggest smiles and best poses in a fashion show organized by the Londonderry on The Tred Avon community’s Residents Activities Committee.

Around 15 residents and four staff members volunteered to model for all the community residents, who were able to watch the show, shop from a pop up boutique, and win chances at a number of centerpieces and donated door prizes.

Photo – from left, Londonderry on the Tred Avon residents Pat Lewers, Vita Strong, Camille Kneale and Betty Hurford show off their best model poses during a fashion show on Tuesday, March 7, organized by the retirement community’s Residents Activities Committee.

“It was a lot of fun for everyone involved,” said Susan Andrews, a Londonderry resident and member of the Residents Activities Committee involved in planning the event. “The outfits were bright, beautiful and fun … and people had a very enjoyable, lighthearted time.”

The fashion show was a true community event, with Lu LaRue clothing provided by Renee Bounds Barringer, jewelry from Piazzzz in St. Michaels, and hair and makeup done by Trish Smith. It was the first fashion show planned by the Residents Activities Committee, which keeps Londonderry’s residents busy with a variety of events and happenings.

“Physical, intellectual, artistic activities – we try cover all the possible activities that somebody might like to participate in,” said longtime Londonderry resident and member of the activities committee Lari Caldwell. “We like to see our residents enjoying everything that we have available here. It’s a lovely place to live.”

Londonderry on the Tred Avon is an intimate residential cooperative community for adults ages 62 and up, offering a variety of housing options from convenient apartments to spacious cottages among 29 acres, including 1500 feet of waterfront shoreline. For more information, visit www.londonderrytredavon.com.

2017 Spring Series by Institute for Religion, Politics and Culture

Institute for Religion, Politics and Culture announces its new Spring 2017 series entitled “Faith And” at Washington College in Chestertown. The six-part series features:

Faith and Leadership
Al Sikes, former Chair of the Federal Communications Commission
“Faith & Leadership: A Discussion of a Life of Public Service”
6:00 PM, Wednesday, March 22
Litrenta Hall, 1st Floor of Toll Science Center, Washington College, Chestertown

Faith, Politics & The Ivory Tower
Josh Dunn, Director, Center for the Society of Government and the Individual, University of Colorado, Colorado Springs
Faith, Politics & The Ivory Tower: Conservatives and Higher Education
5:00 PM, Friday, March 24
Litrenta Hall, 1st Floor of Toll Science Center, Washington College, Chestertown

Faith & Science
JP Moorland, Distinguished Professor ofPhilosophy, Talbot School of Theology, Biola University
7:00 PM, Thursday, April 6
Litrenta Hall, 1st Floor of Toll Science Center, Washington College,
Chestertown

Faith Law & Liberty
Shannon Holzer, award winning author and scholar
7:30 PM, Wednesday, April 12
Litrenta Hall, 1st Floor of Toll Science Center, Washington College,
Chestertown

Faith & The Emotions
James K. A. Smith, Gary and Henrietta Byker, Chair in Applied Reformed Theology and Worldview, Calvin College
6:30 PM, Tuesday, April 18
Litrenta Hall, 1st Floor of Toll Science Center, Washington College,
Chestertown

Faith & Music
Andrew Balio, Principal Trumpet, Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and Director of the True Symphony Institute
6:00 PM. Tuesday, May 3
Litrenta Hall, 1st Floor of Toll Science Center, Washington College,
Chestertown

Senior Nation: Survey Shows Two-Thirds of Seniors Have Been Scammed Online

Financial and online fraud against aging adults are now considered the “crimes of the century” by the National Council on Aging. Scammers often target seniors because of perceived accumulated wealth, and feel that seniors are less likely to report crimes due to fear of embarrassment.

In fact, a new survey[i] by Home Instead, Inc., franchisor of the Home Instead Senior Care® network of franchised businesses that provide in-home care services to seniors, found that two-thirds (67 percent) of U.S. seniors have been the victim or target of at least one common online scam or hack. In addition, more than a third (38 percent) report that someone has tried to scam them online, and 28 percent of surveyed seniors have mistakenly downloaded a computer virus.

Michael Kaiser, executive director of the National Cyber Security Alliance, explains that encouraging seniors to protect themselves online can go a long way in protecting sensitive identity and financial information. “Cybersecurity is about risk reduction. It’s difficult to achieve perfect security. But you can help older adults work to make themselves a more difficult target,” Kaiser said.

To help seniors understand their risks online and take steps to protect themselves, the Home Instead Senior Care network collaborated with the National Cyber Security Alliance to launch a new public education program, Protect Seniors Online, available at www.ProtectSeniorsOnline.com. The new program offers free resources and tips to help seniors understand how scammers operate, familiarize themselves with the most common senior scams and provides proactive steps seniors and caregivers can take to protect sensitive information. The resources include the online “Can You Spot an Online Scam?” quiz to test seniors’ cyber security knowledge.

“For seniors, this is a time in their lives when they should be able to trust that their life’s earnings are protected,” said Jennifer Marchi, owner of the Home Instead Senior Care office serving Queen Anne’s, Talbot, Dorchester, Kent and Caroline counties. “Unfortunately, we know there are people who violate this trust. That’s why we are committed to helping seniors understand the ways they are at risk online and how to protect their information to reduce their chances of being scammed.”

Research shows that more and more seniors are going online – and putting themselves at risk. According to Home Instead’s survey, 97 percent of aging adults use the internet at least once a week. They most commonly use the internet for email, with 94 percent of seniors doing so weekly. Seniors also use the internet to manage finances, with 41 percent banking online and over a quarter (26 percent) paying bills online. Seniors are also active on social media, with 51 percent using Facebook or Twitter at least once a week. All that time online – coupled with what scammers view as perceived financial security and a trusting nature – can make seniors a primary target for scammers.

Seniors are encouraged to take the following precautions, compiled from the National Cyber Security Alliance, Stop Think and Connect and the Home Instead Senior Care network, to protect themselves online:

1. Create passwords and make them strong. Lock all internet-enabled devices, including computers, tablets and smartphones, with secure passwords – at least 12 characters long and a mix of letters, numbers and symbols.
2. Secure access to accounts, with two-step verification. Many online services, including apps and websites, offer free options to help protect personal information. Learn more at LockDownYourLogin.com.
3. Think before you act. Emails or messages that create a sense of urgency – like a problem with a bank account or taxes – are likely a scam. Reach out to companies by phone to determine if emails are legitimate.
4. When in doubt, throw it out. If an email looks unusual, delete it. Clicking on links in email is often how scammers access personal information. Turn on spam filters to filter suspicious messages.
5. Share with care. Be aware of what you share publicly on social media and adjust privacy settings to limit who can see your information.
6. Use security software, including updated anti-virus and anti-spyware software.
7. Adjust browser safety settings for optimum security.
8. Use your computer’s default firewall security protection on your computer.
9. Log out. Log out of apps and websites when you’re finished using them. Leaving them open on your computer or smartphone could make you vulnerable to security and privacy risks.
10. Consider support. Seniors who live alone or spend a lot of time by themselves may want to consider a trusted source, such as adult family members, computer-savvy grandchildren, or professional caregivers, to serve as a second set of eyes and ears when conducting activities online.

“Our hope is that by highlighting the ways scammers can gather sensitive information, and providing seniors with cybersecurity strategies they can implement themselves, we can help ensure their personal information, financial security and independence stay protected,” explains Marchi.

Seniors can test their cybersecurity skills at “Can You Spot an Online Scam?” and view other program resources and tips at ProtectSeniorsOnline.com. Or, contact your local Home Instead Senior Care office for additional resources and to learn how their professional CAREGiversSM may be able to assist. Find an office near you by visiting www.homeinstead.com/state/.

Homestead Manor Assisted Living Offering Free Crab Cake Lunch March 29

On Wednesday, March 29, 2017 at noon, Homestead Manor Assisted Living is hosting a free crab cake luncheon for anyone and everyone considering assisted living. The luncheon will feature a short presentation by our Executive Director, Christine Harrington, along with a guided tour of the newly remodeled resident suites followed by the crab cake luncheon. Reserve your space today by calling 410-479-2273. Homestead Manor, Assisted Living is the Eastern Shore’s Best Kept Secret. Those who attend the luncheon will also get a sneak peek at our newly renovated living room for our residents! A ribbon cutting will be scheduled for the general public in April.

Homestead Manor Assisted Living has a tradition of caring and was founded on the principles of acceptance, compassion, care, and love. It is an assisted living facility dedicated to providing a caring community environment across all levels of care associated with retirement living. Homestead Manor’s mission is to support independence, comfort, dignity and safety in an individualized home-like setting resulting in a high quality life experience.
About Homestead Manor Assisted Living

Homestead Manor Assisted Living offers personalized care for your loved one. There are over 50 spacious resident suites, each with their own private patio and fully accessible bathrooms. State of the art infrastructure through Care Tracker and Medication Management assures your loved one is well taken care of along with on-site doctor visits and physical therapy. Residents enjoy a full range of activities and social activities so they can live independently.

Homestead Manor is located at 410 Colonial Drive, Denton, MD 21629. For more information call 410-479-2273 (CARE) or http://www.homesteadmanoral.com/

Senior Nation: Workshop on Legal Challenges of Aging Loved Ones February 18

Good news: there is no need to fear legal documents for aging loved ones moving into assisted living.

HeartFields Assisted Living at Easton invites you to participate in a free seminar conducted by Mid-Shore attorney Charles Capute. He will walk through a discussion on legal issues one might have in paying for care and protecting elderly parents and themselves both legally and financially. Issues such as powers of attorney, estate planning, and health care powers will be covered followed by a question and answer period.

The Seminar will be held this coming Saturday, February 18th, from 9:00 to 11:00 AM at HeartFields Assisted Living at Easton located at 700 Port Street in Easton, Maryland. Seating is limited, so call 410-820-4400 to reserve your slot.

The lecture and seminar series is part of the HeartFields Lifestyle 360 Programing developed by Five Star Senior Living that centers on the Five Dimensions of Wellness. Heartfields goal is to make life meaningful and fun while giving residents the opportunity to discover new interests and pursuing new friendships. The Five Dimensions support intellect, physical, spiritual, emotional and social growth.

HeartFields Chef Gordon will present a “Five Star” breakfast, using signature items from his daily menus, following the seminar.

For more information of this program please go here

Senior Nation Tips: Do Less, But Do it Better

A recent Washington Post Home Section had an interesting piece dealing with people, in general, having a common sense of feeling overwhelmed, all of the time. This certainly applies to those in the “older” group.

The Post reported that, “We’re driving ourselves crazy trying to do everything, instead of identifying ways to do fewer things and a few things better.”

They offered five suggestions on how one might simplify and prioritize his/her “to-day” lists as well as to think through what can be  eliminated or integrated. And, perhaps most important, when they can say no.

Turn off your cellphone at the same time each night: The endless emails and texts that arrive on our computers and phones, 24 hours a day, are a major reason we feel constantly overwhelmed. There’s never a break in the action. The Post Home Section recommends that you turn off your phone and computer each night at 9:00 PM and wait until the next day to deal with whatever may have come up.

Manage expectations about having a clean and tidy home: No matter how hard you work at keeping your house spotless and orderly, it’s a battle you’re never going to win. So think about which spaces are nonnegotiable – those areas that you absolutely need to have clean and tidy – and just let the other rooms go. It will vary from household to household. No-one’s house looks like a picture in a magazine anyway.

Don’t try to attend every social event: Many people feel guilty if they are unable to attend every social event to which they are invited. It’s okay if you are not at every event. No one will think less of you if you are not at every event.

Find at least two things you can delegate: It can be easier to do household work ourselves rather than explain it to someone else (and then worry that it’s not being done correctly). We just do it ourselves.

But it’s important that we delegate tasks when we can, even if the person doing them doesn’t do them the way we would. Asking for help, is not a sign of weakness, it’s a sign of leadership and efficiency.

Schedule time to do something for yourself: Make yourself a priority. This is not selfish. If you don’t schedule time to do things you need and want to do, it will make you less organized. Block off time on your calendar and commit to giving yourself at least an hour or two each week when you are doing something for yourself. If you don’t give yourself a break, no one else will.

Integrace Bayleigh Chase Goes Red for Women

BCAL Go Red Campaign

On Friday, February 3, the assisted living team at Integrace Bayleigh Chase participated in National Wear Red Day in support of the American Heart Association’s campaign to raise awareness for women’s heart disease.

Go REd Bayleigh Chase

On Friday, February 3, independent living staff and residents at Integrace Bayleigh Chase participated in National Wear Red Day in support of the American Heart Association’s campaign to raise awareness for women’s heart disease.