“Terrorism & the Changing Geopolitical Landscape” at the Avalon

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On Sunday, October 26, American Conversations will continue its discussion of terrorism. This nonpartisan group initiated the conversations so that people can discuss, as Americans facing a common threat, the events that are changing our perceptions of the world and our own security. The conversations focused first on Benghazi just before the House Select Committee Hearings on Benghazi began; in the second conversation, the panel discussed ISIS’ history and ideology. The third conversation explores the broader presence of terrorism throughout the world. There are many names for the faces of terror we see in various parts of Africa, the Middle East, Asia and elsewhere. Radicalized Islamic terror groups, by whatever name, are now on virtually every continent.

The panel, including Mike Sixsmith, a British Counter Intelligence Specialist, who has worked with British Intelligence, MI-6, and private industry for 40 years; John Evans, former Ambassador to Armenia, who served 35 years as a US. Foreign Service Officer; David King, a retired U.S. Special Forces Major; and Christine Dolan, print and broadcast journalist who has reported on terror, international and national politics, will talk about the ways in which this morphing terror presence changes alliances, foreign policy, and the geopolitical landscape.

The American Conversation begins at 7:00 p.m. at the Avalon Theatre at 40 East Dover St., Easton, MD on Sunday, October 26. There is no charge to attend these conversations; reservations, however, are necessary. There will be copies of Mr. Sixsmith’s novel, EXIT PLAN, available for purchase. To reserve a seat, please call Trudy Hamilton at 410 822 5322 or Toni Jennings at 410 822 4137 or email cewing8117@aol.com. Please include name, contact information, and number of people when reserving.

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