Sign Up to Volunteer at this Year’s Chesapeake Film Festival

Our volunteers make all the difference when it comes to the success of the Chesapeake Film Festival. You get to be our ambassadors during the festival and work with festival goers, staff, and filmmakers. No particular work experience is required to volunteer, and we’ll train you, so you can put your best foot forward. We have opportunities not only during the festival being held on October 11-14 but all year round. To complete the 2018 Volunteer Application Form, go to http://chesapeakefilmfestival.com/volunteer-with-cff/. For more information, contact Karen Footner at executivedirector@chesapeakefilmfestival.com. And in exchange, you get your fill of cinematic entertainment. It all spells fun. We would love to have you help us.

Very Special Event as Chesapeake Film Festival Presents Cafeteria Man

On Friday, May 11 at 6:00 p.m., The Chesapeake Film Festival’s new series REEL GEMS is presenting Cafeteria Man at St. Michaels High School. Tickets are $15 and can be purchased online at chesapeakefilmfestival.com or at the door.

In addition to the film, “larger than life” Tony Geraci, the star of the film; director, cinematographer and coproducer Richard Chisolm; and Deanna Deese Kilmon of Chesapeake Harvest in Easton will be on hand for a round table discussion afterward.

DID YOU KNOW

– One out of three children born in the United States in the year 2000 will develop diabetes.
– One third of children and adolescents in the U.S. are overweight or obese.
– The National School Lunch Program serves approximately 30.5 million lunches per day at a cost of $8.7 billion a year.
– Most of our food travels 1,500 miles before we eat it.

Cafeteria Man is a story of positive movement that shows what’s possible in our nation’s schools. It’s about the aspiration of activists and citizens coming together to change the way kids eat at school. It’s about overhauling a dysfunctional nutritional system. And, it’s the story of what it takes, and who it takes, to make solutions happen.

The feature documentary film chronicles an ambitious effort to ‘green’ the public-school diet serving 83,000 students in Baltimore – and later, over 200,000 students in Memphis.

Leading the charge to replace pre-plated, processed foods with locally-grown, freshly-prepared meals is Tony Geraci, food-service director for the city’s public schools. A charismatic chef from New Orleans, Geraci’s bold vision includes school vegetable gardens, student-designed meals, and nutrition education in the classroom. His mission is as audacious as it is practical.

“This has never been done before,” affirms Geraci, “but it makes perfect sense.”

The film follows Tony Geraci as a central character, introducing audiences to the dynamic assortment of human ingredients necessary for school food reform efforts to succeed.

Among the protagonists in this story are parents, teachers, administrators, farmers, chefs, and dozens of creative and motivated students. Their collective efforts are proof positive that a ‘village’ is indeed required to transform school food.

Over the course of several years, the film traces efforts to make healthy, nutritious meals available to all the city’s students. Viewers watch as inner city youth plant and harvest vegetables at the school system’s 33-acre teaching farm, now a national model. They witness what it takes to get local produce on school plates. And they watch as high school seniors develop practical job skills through a new citywide culinary vocational training program.

“If Tony makes this happen here the way he wants to, I think you’ll see this happening all over the country,” says best-selling author and food activist Michael Pollan in the film.

One of the crowning achievements of Tony’s tenure – Great Kids Farm – is a thriving, hands-on, educational resource. Since 2009, more than 5,000 students and teachers have benefited from the farm’s programs. (To learn more, visit: www.greatkidsfarm.org.) The Baltimore City Public Schools has continued to strengthen ties with local farmers, the After School Supper Program is reaching more parents/students, and a growing number of schools are incorporating salad bars.

In Easton, Sales and Marketing Director of Chesapeake Harvest, Deanna Deese Kilman, explains that her organization works on behalf of farmers to help them find marketing opportunities. She emphasizes that Tony values “Fresh” while her organization values both “local and community building to support the local economy.”

Curt Ellis, Executive Director, Foodcorps and Co-Producer, King Corn says, “Geraci is an inspiration. He proves that when you get students growing, cooking and eating healthy food, it’s not children’s lunch that changes—it’s children’s lives.” Richard Chisolm, the film’s director celebrates that we don’t have to live with a terrible situation and cites Tony’s “contagious optimism” and “evangelical” nature as helping to turn the situation around. “Tony thought that life could be better” and he made a change, Chisolm says and that why making this film was so important.

The Chesapeake Film Festival’s REEL GEMS will feature Cafeteria Man at St. Michaels High School (200 Seymour Avenue, St. Michaels, MD) on Friday, May 11 at 6:00 p.m. Tickets are $15 and can be purchased online at Chesapeakefilmfestival.com or at the door.

Chesapeake Film Festival Announces New Members to its Board of Directors

The Chesapeake Film Festival (CFF) is delighted to announce six new members to its Board of Directors.  The new directors—all Talbot County Residents—have immediately assumed their seats in preparation for the 2018 Chesapeake Film Festival to take place from October 11 – 14 in Easton, St. Michaels, and Cambridge, Maryland.

The new board members will facilitate new collaborations that are expected to increase CFF’s local and national outreach.  Their experiences also add to CFF’s bench of marketing and fundraising capabilities.  More information about the Festival can be found at www.chesapeakefilmfestival.com.

Richard L. Calkins is retired from managing international organizations for forty years in Washington, DC, and Europe.  For nearly ten years, Richard served as Executive Director of CINE in Washington, DC., which provided a platform for short and documentary filmmakers, including student filmmakers.  CINE worked with the USIA to provide content internationally through their network of television stations and theaters.  Its Golden Eagle competition and awards are well known in the documentary community.  While during his time with CINE, it was required to win a CINE award to be nominated for an Academy Award in the Short Documentary, Feature Documentary, Animated Short Subject, and Live Action Short Subject categories.  Richard was a regular judge at film festivals in Parma, Italy; Toulon, France; Karlovy Vary, Czech Republic, and in Paris, and estimates that he has judged and watched some 600 documentaries annually.

From 1974 – 1986, Richard was Dean of the American College of Switzerland (which moved in 2010), and a consultant and VP of Special Projects for Nestle, based in Vevey, Switzerland and Paris. His annual business travel was to 40-45 countries on four continents.  From 1995 until his retirement in 2007, Richard was Executive Director of the International Student House in Washington, DC.

Since retirement in 2007, Richard has served on the Board of the St. Michaels Community Center as its Vice-President and Chair of the Development Committee.  In 2010, he joined the Board of the Talbot County Democratic Forum, became its President in 2011, stepped down in 2015, and is now chair of its Communications Committee.

Sandy Cannon-Brown, founder and president of VideoTakes, Inc., is an award-winning environmental filmmaker whose work has taken her to Central and South America, West Africa, the Northern Great Plains, and the Everglades. She was an associate director for the Center for Environmental Filmmaking at American University, honored as CEF’s first senior scholar in 2013 and named AU’s adjunct professor of the year in 2011.  Among her other honors, Women in Film & Video DC (WIFV) honored Cannon-Brown as a Woman of Vision. She served as WIFV’s president 2011-12. Since 2012, Cannon-Brown’s films have focused on issues facing the Chesapeake Bay.  Her latest film, in partnership with writer Tom Horton and photographer Dave Harp, is High Tide in Dorchester.  This trio previously merged talents to create Beautiful Swimmers Revisited, a documentary inspired by William W. Warner’s 1976 Pulitzer Prize-winning book, Beautiful Swimmers: Watermen, Crabs and the Chesapeake Bay. 

Bill Dennison is a Professor of Marine Science and Vice President for Science Applications at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES). Bill’s primary mission within UMCES is to coordinate the Integration and Application Network.  UMCES is comprised of three laboratories distributed across the watershed of Chesapeake Bay within Maryland: Appalachian Laboratory in Frostburg, Chesapeake Biological Laboratory on the western shore of Chesapeake Bay in Solomons and Horn Point Laboratory on the eastern shore of Chesapeake Bay near Cambridge as well as Maryland Sea Grant College in College Park, Maryland. UMCES also operates an Annapolis Liaison Office. Bill Dennison rejoined UMCES in 2002 following a ten-year stint at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia. He originally started at UMCES (then the Center for Environmental and Estuarine Science) in 1987 as a Postdoctorate/Research Assistant Professor based at Horn Point Laboratory. In Australia, Bill developed an active Marine Botany group at the University of Queensland with strong links to the Healthy Waterways Campaign for Moreton Bay. Bill obtained his academic training from Western Michigan University (B.A., Biology & Environmental Science), the University of Alaska (M.S., Biological Oceanography), The University of Chicago (Ph.D., Biology), and State University of New York at Stony Brook at Stony Brook (Postdoc, Coastal Marine Scholar).

George A. Nilson practiced law in the public and private sectors in Maryland from 1967- 2016.  Highlights of his law practice at DLA Piper LLP US (1968-1973; 1983-2006), include the representation of The Rouse Company in its development of Columbia and other new town developments; halting the interstate expressway in Baltimore City’s Leakin Park. His environmental litigation includes stopping the construction of an oil refinery on Chesapeake Bay in St. Mary’s County; closing two controversial landfills in the Baltimore metropolitan area and assisting an Eastern Shore county in continuing and eventually relocating its landfill.   Other work includes representing amicus in a case enabling public funding of Camden Yards sports facility; successful representation of Washington Redskins in a suit to block their stadium construction; and representation of Maryland Stadium Authority in legal representation disputes. Prior to his retirement from DLA Piper, he represented as either Legislative Agent or counsel several private and public clients with significant and highly visible issues pending before the Maryland General Assembly.

In 1973, he began his public sector for nine years in the Office of Attorney General as an Assistant Attorney General and Deputy Attorney General where he briefed, argued and won three cases before the U.S. Supreme Court. Early in this time, he served as counsel to the General Assembly, creating modern-day office of counsel to the General Assembly. Additional highlights include serving as lead counsel for State in original school financing litigation and a landmark MARC case establishing right of all special needs children to free, appropriate public education.

George concluded his legal career serving as City Solicitor for Baltimore City from 2007-2016.

Carol Peach-Woods is the Director of Sales and Marketing at the Inn at Perry Cabin in St. Michaels, MD.  The Inn at Perry Cabin by Belmond is a global collection of exceptional hotel and luxury travel adventures in some of the world’s most inspiring and enriching destinations.  Carol manages a team of 8 and oversee 2 public relations agencies covering domestic and international markets—with the goal of broadening multi-generational appeal and expanding the drive market from 2-hours to 5-hours.

She oversees all transient, group and golf sales as well as meetings, events, and festivals for the 5,000 square feet of internal space and outdoor events on the 25-acre property and 18-hole Pete Dye golf course. Her team leverages social media and technology to create new business opportunities. Carol has doubled destination wedding revenues.  She was instrumental in gaining accolades to include Conde Nast 2017 Readers’ Choice Award, #1 in resorts New York State and Mid-Atlantic.

Nancy Tabor has more than 25 years of marketing, promotion, web management, and event planning experience.  She has held senior marketing and event planning positions at T. Rowe Price, Zurich Insurance Group and University of Maryland, Baltimore. In 2004-06, she was the marketing chair of the annual fundraiser for the Everyman Theatre in Baltimore. She has won top awards from the International Association of Business Communicators, The Insurance Marketing Communication Association and the Maryland State Department of Education.

Currently, an Adjunct Professor teaching Communications at Chesapeake College, she has taught Communications, Public Speaking, and Oral Interpretation at various Maryland Colleges. They include Salisbury University, Notre Dame University of MD, University of Baltimore, Johns Hopkins University, Stevenson University and the Community College of Baltimore County.

Reel Gems – A New Series from the Chesapeake Film Festival

Join us as we celebrate film year-round and feature seven of our most memorable films from past festivals.

With something for everyone, the series screens first at the Oxford Community Center (200 Oxford Road, Oxford, MD 21654); moves to St. Michaels High School (200 Seymour Avenue, St. Michaels, MD 21663); and closes at the Academy Art Museum (106 South Street, Easton, MD 21601).

For many films, filmmakers will be on hand to discuss the script, cinematography or whatever interests you about the film.

Tickets for all films are $15 and may be purchased online at chesapeakefilmfestival.com or at the door. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. and all films start at 6:00 p.m.

April 20, 2018
Film:  Swimmers
Oxford Community Center
Film and Q&A– 6:00-8:30 p.m.

Swimmers is a drama about Will Tyler who struggles to hold onto his livelihood on the Chesapeake Bay. He and his wife suffer from the financial woes of a poor fishing season and the sudden loss of Will’s boat. Filmed in Oxford, Swimmers won the Grand Jury Prize for Best New American Film from the Seattle International Film Festival. Director Doug Sadler will be present.

April 27, 2018
Film: TRI
Oxford Community Center
Film and Q&A– 6:00-8:30 p.m.

TRI is about Natalie, an ultrasound tech with a history of not finishing things who is inspired by a cancer patient to sign up for a triathlon. Natalie is introduced to the strange world of triathletes and meets a colorful cast of characters as she trains for the Nation’s Triathlon. Co-Producer and Casting Director Kimberly Skyrme will be in attendance.

“Local Fare” at St. Michaels High School

Friday, May 11
Film: Cafeteria Man
St. Michaels High School
Film and Q&A 6:00-7:30 p.m.

Cafeteria Man is a story of a positive movement that shows what’s possible in our nation’s schools. It’s about the aspiration of activists and citizens coming together to change the way kids eat at school. And, it’s the story of what it takes, and who it takes, to make solutions happen. Post Film Discussion will include Director, Richard Chisolm and Denna Deese Kilmon, of Easton’s Chesapeake Harvest.

Friday, May 18
Film: Wild Ponies of Chincoteague
St. Michaels High School
Film and Q&A: 6:00 -7:30 p.m.

Wild Ponies of Chincoteague is the documentary that chronicles the island’s famous Pony Penning week, including its Pony Swim and Pony Auction. Co-directors Kurt Kolaja and Tod Mesirow tell the story of three Feather Fund recipients, specifically Sabrina Dobbins, whose Chincoteague pony helped save her from severe depression and self-harm. Post film discussion will include Sabrina Dobbins, the young woman featured in the film.

“Inside Art” at the Easton Academy of Art
This series of three films is aptly titled “Inside Art!” as it makes visible the inner world of the art scene.

Friday, May 11
Film: Heavy Weight Paint
Academy Art Museum
Easton, Maryland
Film 6:00 p.m. (feature length film)

Heavy Weight Paint is a feature length documentary film about four figurative painters: Jerome Lagarrigue, Joseph Adolphe, Tim Okamura, and Taha Clayton. Each artist faces unique obstacles, but the painters’ uncommon friendship provides the moral support to spur them onward. It is anticipated that the Director Jeff Martini will be present for a Q & A following the screening of the film.

Friday, June 22
Film: The Art of the Steal
Academy Art Museum
Easton, Maryland
Film 6:00 -7:40 p.m.

“The (2009) documentary The Art of the Steal explores the controversial plan to move the Barnes Foundation’s $25 billion collection of modernist and post-impressionist art from its longtime home in the Philadelphia suburbs to a new downtown gallery — against the wishes of its founder.” (Joel Rose, All Things Considered, 2/25/10) Directed by Don Argott.

Friday, June 29
Film: The Guest of Cindy Sherman
Academy Art Museum
Easton, Maryland
Film 6:00-7:30 p.m.

Analyzing his relationship with the reclusive artist Cindy Sherman leads filmmaker Paul Hasegawa-Overacker to confront his own identity in this unexpectedly humorous documentary. Armed with a video camera, he attended art gallery openings, intriguing many with his candid, witty assessments. Among the latter was Cindy Sherman, the press-shy superstar, who invited Paul to her studio for a series of exclusive filmed interviews and a romantic relationship blossoms. Co-Directed by Tom Donahue and Paul Hasegawa-Overacker.

The REEL GEMS series is generously supported by the Talbot County Arts Council.

The Chesapeake Film Festival (CFF) is the only film festival on the Eastern Shore to bring together filmmakers and diverse audiences of film enthusiasts for an annual weekend festival in Easton, MD. Visit us on Facebook or at www.chesapeakefilmfestival.com.

Chesapeake Film Festival Series Launches at the Oxford Community Center

Chesapeake Film Festival has selected ten of its most memorable films from past festivals to launch a winter/spring series. Justly called REEL GEMS, the series opens at the Oxford Community Center (200 Oxford Road, Oxford, MD 21654) with future screenings in St. Michaels and Easton. The series is generously supported by the Talbot County Arts Council.

For each film, filmmakers will be on hand to discuss the script, cinematography or whatever interests you about the film. Tickets are $15 and may be purchased online at chesapeakefilmfestival.com or at the door.

“The REEL GEMS Film Series will help keep the Chesapeake Film Festival and our mission in the public eye, at the same time offer quality cinematic programming year-round. This film series is primarily dedicated to selections from our archives of some of the best films that have previously shown at the Chesapeake Film Festival and we are glad to have the opportunity to share them again with our audiences.”

Cid Collins Walker
Artistic Director
Chesapeake Film Festival

March 16, 2018
Film: Arc of Light: A Portrait of Anna Campbell Bliss
Oxford Community Center
Doors open at 5:30 pm
Film and Q&A 6:00- 7:30 p.m.

ARC OF LIGHT: A Portrait of Anna Campbell Bliss is about an artist, architect and designer who has devoted her life to the creation of works of art that explore the complex intersections between art, technology, science, nature, poetry, mathematics, and architecture. The film looks at the astonishing range of Bliss’s work, from small painterly and digitally based studies of color and light to architectural site commissions of immense scale. It also puts her work in art-historical context and traces her Modernist influences, including the Bauhaus artists of the 1920s. The film includes compelling interviews with the artist’s husband, architect, and furniture designer Robert Bliss; filmmaker Judy Hallet; and professor of architecture Stanley Hallet.

Filmmaker, Cid Collins Walker in attendance. Cid is the founder of Black Opal Productions and is a resident of Oxford. Her husband Richard wrote the screenplay for ARC OF LIGHT. In addition to documentary filmmaking, Cid has extensive experience in television and film production, creative direction, animation, print design and brand management. Her awards in television and film include four Telly Awards for her work in production design. She also served on the Board of Directors of Women in Film & Video, Washington DC.She is currently working on her first book and second screenplay.

March 22nd
Film: Flash of Genius
Oxford Community Center
Doors open at 5:30 pm
Film and Q&A– 6:00-8:30 p.m.

When college professor and part-time inventor Robert Kearns (Greg Kinnear) develops an intermittent windshield wiper, he believes he, his wife (Lauren Graham) and their children will be set for life. Though the invention is a big hit with automakers in 1960s Detroit, Kearns finds himself forced out of the picture. Determined to collect the recognition and financial reward due him, he wages an arduous legal battle with the auto industry.

Filmmaker Tim Kearns in Attendance. Tim Kearns is the son of Robert Kearns who is the featured subject of the film. The Kearns family reside in Oxford and provide a wonderful Q&A about the actual invention as well as the making of the film.

April 20, 2018
Film: Swimmers
Oxford Community Center
Doors open at 5:30 pm
Film and Q&A– 6:00-8:30 p.m.

Swimmers is a 2005 American independent drama about Will Tyler who struggles to hold on to his livelihood on the Chesapeake Bay. He and his wife suffer from the financial woes of a poor fishing season, the sudden loss of Will’s boat and Will’s fierce pride in not having to ask for handouts.

Filmed in Oxford, Swimmers premiered at the Sundance Film Festival on January 22, 2005, and won the Grand Jury Prize for Best New American Film from the Seattle International Film Festival. The title and theme of the film were inspired by the Latin name for the Chesapeake Bay’s indigenous Maryland blue crab – Callinectes sapidus – Callinectes translates as “beautiful swimmers.”

Filmmaker Doug Sadler will be present. Raised in Oxford, son of Ken and Sarah Sadler, Doug filmed this movie in Oxford and sold the rights to Netflix to enjoy a successful career as filmmaker and as an adjunct professor at Johns Hopkins/MICA.

April 27, 2018
Film: TRI
Oxford Community Center
Doors open at 5:30 pm
Film and Q&A– 6:00-8:30 p.m.

Natalie, an ultrasound tech with a history of not finishing things, is inspired by a cancer patient to sign up for a Triathlon. Natalie is introduced to the strange (and aerodynamic) world of triathletes and meets a colorful cast of characters as she trains for the Nation’s Triathlon. With the support of her new teammates, she digs deep to discover just how far she can push her mind and body.

Filmmaker in Attendance: Co-Producer and Casting Director Kimberly Skyrme will be in attendance. Kimberly is a Chesapeake Film Festival Board Member and frequently films on the Eastern shore. She is a Casting Director – Producer – Writer – Director – in short, A STORY TELLER! Her work includes Independent and Hollywood Feature Film, Television Series, Government Agency Content and Commercials. She recently completed directing “Proof of Concept” pieces for The Domesticators and Ward 8, two series that are in development with storylines and plans to shoot on the East Coast.

“Local Fare” at St. Michaels High School when REEL GEMS will also show two films at St Michaels High School located at 200 Seymour Avenue, St. Michaels, 21663. Doors open for all films at 5:30 pm and films begins at 6:00 pm. Tickets are $15 and may be purchased online at chesapeakefilmfestival.com or at the door.

Friday, May 11
Film: Cafeteria Man
St. Michaels High School
Doors open 5:30 pm
Film starts at 6 pm

Cafeteria Man is a story of a positive movement that shows what’s possible in our nation’s schools. It’s about the aspiration of activists and citizens coming together to change the way kids eat at school. It’s about overhauling a dysfunctional nutritional system. And, it’s the story of what it takes, and who it takes, to make solutions happen.

“A truly inspiring film about reform in school cafeterias. It’s evidence that we CAN make a difference in our communities and overcome the forces of gigantic agri-businesses who want us to keep eating pre-packaged sawdust. Watching this made me happy.” Anonymous reviewer

Post Film Discussion will include Director, Richard Chisolm and Denna Deese Kilmon, Sales and Marketing Director of Easton’s Chesapeake Harvest.Chesapeake Harvest seeks out farmers who show their commitment to regenerative agricultural practices that protect the future of the Chesapeake Bay.

Richard Chisolm is an Emmy award-winning documentary filmmaker and cinematographer with thirty years of production experience. Based in Baltimore, MD, he has shot films and television program on a wide variety of subjects in the US and abroad.

Deeply committed to the value of real stories and the adventures of real people, Richard has worked for PBS, National Geographic, BBC, Discovery Channel, HBO, and other broadcast entities. He was a camera operator on the HBO series, “The Wire” and the Director of Photography for both of ABC’s “Hopkins” prime time medical documentary series (2002 & 2008). He is also the recipient of a Peabody Award, a Columbia DuPont Journalism Award, two Kodak Vision Awards, four CINE Golden Eagles, and is a Distinguished Alumnus of the University of Maryland.

Friday, May 18
Film: Wild Ponies of Chincoteague
St. Michaels High School
Doors Open 5:30
Film 6:00 pm

As the auctioneer yells “sold!” Sabrina Dobbins breaks down, with tears streaming down her face. She hugs friends and family as reality hits her: Dobbins is now the proud owner of a Chincoteague pony, her dream come true. But her filly is more than just a pony, it’s also a blessing.

“The Wild Ponies of Chincoteague” documentary chronicles the island’s famous Pony Penning week, including its Pony Swim and Pony Auction. Co-directors Kurt Kolaja and Tod Mesirow tell the story of three Feather Fund recipients, specifically Dobbins, whose Chincoteague pony helped save her from severe depression and self-harm.

“Things that interest me are stories like Sabrina’s and stories like ponies, and stories that don’t get shouted out,” Kolaja said.

The co-directors’ production process took a little more than three years and began as something completely different from the final film. Kolaja said they first headed to Chincoteague for a separate project, but when that fell through, Mesirow purchased the rights to the film the two had already shot.

Post film discussion will include Sabrina Dobbins, the young woman featured in the film.

REEL GEMS will also screen films at the Academy Art Museum (at 106 South Street, Easton, MD 21601). This series of three films is aptly titled “Inside Art!” as it makes visible the inner world of the art scene. Doors open for all films at 5:30 pm and films begins at 6:00 pm.Tickets are $15 and may be purchased online at chesapeakefilmfestival.com or at the door.

Friday, May 11
Film: Heavy Weight Paint
Academy Art Museum in Easton
Doors open 5:30 pm
Film begins 6:00 pm

Heavy Weight Paint is a feature length documentary film about four figurative painters: Jerome Lagarrigue, Joseph Adolphe, Tim Okamura, and Taha Clayton. They are at different points in their careers, but share the struggle to survive the difficult, often grueling, challenges of the art world. Each artist faces unique obstacles, but the painters’ uncommon friendship provides the moral support to spur them onward. Their artistic efforts will intersect when the four painters attempt to pull off an ambitious collaborative show – putting the purity of their craft, and their ideals, to the test – but also bringing the potential to land them in the spotlight of the highly competitive New York art scene.

Director Jeff Martini has been involved in Film, Television, Music & the Web for over 15 years. He has worked as director, editor, producer, music composer, cinematographer, sound engineer, web developer, Foley artist and an instructor for artists, agencies, TV stations, Indie film houses & schools in and around New York City. He has recently relocated to Capitol Hill, Washington DC.

It is anticipated that the filmmakers will be present for a Q & A following the screening of the film.

Friday, June 22
Film: The Art of the Steal
Academy Art Museum in Easton
Doors open 5:30 pm
Film begins 6:00 pm

The Art of the Steal is a 2009 documentary about the controversial move of the Barnes Foundation, generally considered to be the world’s best collection of post-Impressionist art and valued in 2009 to be worth at least $25-billion, from Merion, Pennsylvania to Philadelphia. The move was disputed because Dr. Albert C. Barnes, who died in 1951, had specifically selected Lower Merion Township for its location. The collection was moved in 2012 to downtown Philadelphia. The film presents an account of the claimed breaking of Barnes’ will, which it presents as a decades-long process that was initiated by Philadelphians who were enemies of Barnes while he was alive, and that was continued by their heirs.

Friday, June 29
Film: The Guest of Cindy Sherman
Academy Art Museum in Easton
Doors open 5:30 pm
Film begins 6:00 pm

Analyzing his relationship with the reclusive artist Cindy Sherman leads filmmaker Paul Hasegawa-Overacker to confront his own identity in this personal and unexpectedly humorous documentary. Armed with a video camera, he attended art gallery openings, intriguing many with his candid, witty assessments and winning fans in the process. Among the latter was Cindy Sherman, the press-shy art superstar, who invited Paul to her studio for a series of exclusive filmed interviews. In these sessions, he gains insight into her artistic process and a romantic relationship blossoms as they fall in love. Their initial bliss takes a turn when Paul gets caught up in the aura of Cindy’s celebrity and he is subordinated to a role as Cindy’s guest at the star-studded openings and dinners she regularly attends.

Spanning over 15 years and with unprecedented access to the great artist, including interviews with a veritable who’s who of the art and entertainment world, the film paints a vivid picture of the contemporary art scene and provides a witty, illuminating look at celebrity, anxiety, and art.

The date and time of the tenth film in the REEL GEMS series will be announced at a later time.

The Chesapeake Film Festival (CFF) is the only film festival on the Eastern Shore to bring together filmmakers and diverse audiences of film enthusiasts for an annual weekend festival in Easton, MD and throughout the year in its series, REEL GEMS. CFF offers educational opportunity through cinematic presentations, lectures, and panel discussions of CFF initiatives. Visit us on Facebook or at www.chesapeakefilmfestival.com.

Chesapeake Film Festival Kicks Off Film Series REEL GEMS at OCC

CFF film series REEL GEMS begins on Friday, March 16, 2018 at the Oxford Community Center in Oxford.

The Oxford Community Center is located at 200 Oxford Road, Oxford, MD 21601. Tickets are $15 and may be purchased online at Chesapeake Film Festival.com or at the door.

March 16th, 5:30- 7:00 p.m. – Arc of Light: A Portrait of Anna Campbell Bliss

ARC OF LIGHT: A Portrait of Anna Campbell Bliss is about an artist, architect and designer who has devoted her life to the creation of works of art that explore the complex intersections between art, technology, science, nature, poetry, mathematics, and architecture. The film looks at the astonishing range of Bliss’s work, from small painterly and digitally based studies of color and light to architectural site commissions of immense scale. It also puts her work in art-historical context and traces her Modernist influences, including the Bauhaus artists of the 1920s. The film includes compelling interviews with the artist’s husband, architect, and furniture designer Robert Bliss; filmmaker Judy Hallet; and professor of architecture Stanley Hallet.

Filmmaker Cid Collins Walker will discuss the film following the screening. Cid is the founder of Black Opal Productions and is a resident of Oxford. Her husband Richard wrote the screenplay for ARC OF LIGHT. In addition to documentary filmmaking, Cid has extensive experience in television and film production, creative direction, animation, print design and brand management. Her awards in television and film include four Telly Awards for her work in production design. She also served on the Board of Directors of Women in Film & Video, Washington DC. She is currently working on her first book and second screenplay.

March 22nd, 5:30 – 7:00 p.m. – Film: Flash of Genius

Flash of Genius is the story of a college professor and part-time inventor Robert Kearns (Greg Kinnear) who develops an intermittent windshield wiper. With the invention, he believes he, his wife (Lauren Graham) and their children will be set for life. Though the invention is a big hit with automakers in 1960s Detroit, Kearns finds himself forced out of the picture. Determined to collect the recognition and financial reward due him, he wages an arduous legal battle with the auto industry.

Filmmaker Tim Kearns in Attendance. Tim Kearns is the son of Robert Kearns who is the featured subject of the film. The Kearns family reside in Oxford and provide a wonderful Q&A about the actual invention as well as the making of the film.

The Oxford Community Center, Inc., is a 501-c-3 nonprofit organization, whose mission is to enrich community life by fostering educational, cultural, and social opportunities. Event proceeds benefit future programming at the Center. Visit us on Facebook at Oxford Community Center, Inc. or at oxfordcc.org

The Chesapeake Film Festival (CFF) is the only film festival on the Eastern Shore to bring together filmmakers and diverse audiences of film enthusiasts for an annual weekend festival in Easton, MD and throughout the year in its series, REEL GEMS. CFF offers educational opportunity through cinematic presentations, lectures, and panel discussions of CFF initiatives. Visit us on Facebook or at www.chesapeakefilmfestival.com

Chesapeake Film Festival Joins with OCC for “REEL GEMS” Series

Chesapeake Film Festival (CFF) announces the kick-off of CFF REEL GEMS – Talbot County, a pilot Winter/Spring film series that will screen selected films from the CFF film library. This first series highlights standout films and filmmakers from past Chesapeake Film Festivals since its inception in 2007. CFF REEL GEMS in supported by the Talbot County Arts Council. Films will be screened in Oxford, St. Michaels and Easton, MD.

The Oxford Community Center launches the CFF series with three of the four films whose filmmakers who live, or have lived, in Oxford. The Center is located at 200 Oxford Road, Oxford, MD 21654. Tickets are $15 and may be purchased online at Chesapeake Film Festival.com or at the door.

March 16th, 5:30- 7:00 p.m. Arc of Light: A Portrait of Anna Campbell Bliss

ARC OF LIGHT: A Portrait of Anna Campbell Bliss is about an artist, architect and designer who has devoted her life to the creation of works of art that explore the complex intersections between art, technology, science, nature, poetry, mathematics, and architecture. The film looks at the astonishing range of Bliss’s work, from small painterly and digitally based studies of color and light to architectural site commissions of immense scale. It also puts her work in art-historical context and traces her Modernist influences, including the Bauhaus artists of the 1920s. The film includes compelling interviews with the artist’s husband, architect, and furniture designer Robert Bliss; filmmaker Judy Hallet; and professor of architecture Stanley Hallet.

Filmmaker, Cid Collins Walker in attendance. Cid is the founder of Black Opal Productions and is a resident of Oxford. Her husband Richard wrote the screenplay for ARC OF LIGHT. The film received its East Coast premiere at the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, DC in March 2012 as part of the Environmental Film Festival. It was further screened at many museums in the U.S. and ultimately was televised on PBS.

March 22nd, 5:30 – 7:00 p.m. Film: Flash of Genius

When college professor and part-time inventor Robert Kearns (Greg Kinnear) develops an intermittent windshield wiper, he believes he, his wife (Lauren Graham) and their children will be set for life. Though the invention is a big hit with automakers in 1960s Detroit, Kearns finds himself forced out of the picture. Determined to collect the recognition and financial reward due him, he wages an arduous legal battle with the auto industry.

Filmmaker Tim Kearns in Attendance. Tim Kearns is the son of Robert Kearns who is the featured subject of the film. The Kearns family reside in Oxford and provide a wonderful Q&A about the actual invention as well as the making of the film.

April 20th, 5:30 – 7:00 p.m. Film: Swimmers

Swimmers is a 2005 American independent drama about Will Tyler who struggles to hold on to his livelihood on the Chesapeake Bay. He and his wife suffer from the financial woes of a poor fishing season, the sudden loss of Will’s boat and Will’s fierce pride in not having to ask for handouts.

Filmed in Oxford, Swimmers premiered at the Sundance Film Festival on January 22, 2005, and won the Grand Jury Prize for Best New American Film from the Seattle International Film Festival. The title and theme of the film were inspired by the Latin name for the Chesapeake Bay’s indigenous Maryland blue crab – Callinectes sapidusCallinectes translates as “beautiful swimmers.”

Filmmaker Doug Sadler will be present. Born and Raised in Oxford, son of Ken and Sarah Sadler, Doug filmed this movie in Oxford and sold the rights to Netflix to enjoy a successful career as filmmaker and as an adjunct professor at Johns Hopkins/MICA.

April 27th, 5:30 – 7:00 p.m. Film: TRI

Natalie, an ultrasound tech with a history of not finishing things, is inspired by a cancer patient to sign up for a Triathlon. Natalie is introduced to the strange (and aerodynamic) world of triathletes and meets a colorful cast of characters as she trains for the Nation’s Triathlon. With the support of her new teammates, she digs deep to discover just how far she can push her mind and body.

Filmmaker in Attendance: Co-Producer and Casting Director Kimberly Skyrme will be in attendance.

The Oxford Community Center, Inc., is a 501-c-3 nonprofit organization, whose mission is to enrich community life by fostering educational, cultural, and social opportunities. Event proceeds benefit future programming at the Center. Visit us on Facebook at Oxford Community Center, Inc. or at oxfordcc.org

The Chesapeake Film Festival (CFF) is the only film festival on the Eastern Shore to bring together filmmakers and diverse audiences of film enthusiasts for an annual weekend festival in Easton, MD and throughout the year in its series, REEL GEMS. CFF offers educational opportunity through cinematic presentations, lectures, and panel discussions of CFF initiatives. Visit us on Facebook or at www.chesapeakefilmfestival.com

Dr. Rachel Franklin Presents “William Wyler, The Films and His Music”

Dr. Rachel Franklin presents William Wyler, The Films and His Music at the Academy Art Museum to close Chesapeake Film Festival, Sunday, October 29, 4:30 p.m. Tickets for sale at $12/ticket or $50 for a Sunday pass. www.chesapeakefilmfestival.com

Dr. Rachel Franklin, a British-born concert pianist, and a renowned speaker and performer in the Mid-Atlantic, will present a lecture on film music, William Wyler, The Films and His Music, at the Academy Art Museum.  Her performance closes the 2017 Chesapeake Film Festival. A reception follows with an awards presentation for the Festival’s best films in different categories.

Director William Wyler made some of the most memorable films in the Hollywood canon, and worked with many distinguished composers. Among the dazzling array of musical talent are Max Steiner, Miklos Rosza, and Aaron Copland.  How did Steiner conceive his score for Wyler’s Ben-Hur and what unique qualities did Aaron Copland bring to his exquisite and searing music for The Heiress?  Audiences will thrill to Jerome Moross’ fabulous theme to The Big Country and admire the subtle, heartwarming genius of Hugo Friedhofer’s score to The Best Years of Our Lives.  Franklin also discusses the near miraculous ability of Wyler to frame a great shot and how his composers managed to reflect his masterful intentions.

The 2017 Chesapeake Film Festival celebrates its 10th anniversary with a series of national and local films followed by film maker Q & A, and expert panel discussions.  The CFF headquarters is the Avalon Theatre. Satellite theaters include the Talbot County Public Library, Easton Premier Cinemas, and Academy Art Museum. This year, for the first time, CFF extends to a second city at the Cambridge Premier Cinemas.

Chesapeake Film Festival Hosts a Day of Film and Discussion about Climate Change

On October 28th, the 2017 Chesapeake Film Festival shows the power of documentary film in a full day of national and local films on the topic of climate change.  A subject widely discussed and sometimes contentious, audiences will view a series of dynamic films that both inform and entertain.  Thought leaders in the field will be on hand to clarify the impacts of climate change on the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries and beyond, and on the human, public health, and economic losses for those who live on the shoreline and work its waters.

The Avalon Theatre opens its doors at 10:30 a.m. with a series of environmental shorts: When I Plant A Tree, directed by Jonah Moshammer; Fisherman Without A Sea, directed by Lucas Bonetti; The Next Epoch Seed Library, directed by Candace Thompson; and The Last Boat Out, directed by Laura Seltzer-Duny.

The program’s formal launch begins at noon with opening remarks from Program Chair and Tilghman resident George A. Nilson, and from Charles O. Monk, II, Board of Visitors Chair of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES, Horn Point).

Leonardo DiCaprio has long brought his celebrity to raising awareness of climate change.  In National Geographic’s Before the Flood produced by Martin Scorsese, DiCaprio meets with scientists worldwide to discuss the impacts of climate change. The film opened to acclaim at the Washington DC.

Environmental Film Festival last April, and CFF Artistic Director Cid Collins Walker succeeded in securing permission to show the film in the Easton festival.

A partnership with the Eastern Shore Land Conservancy brings substantive expertise to the film discussions.  Following the DiCaprio film, Town Creek Foundation Executive Director Stuart Clarke will moderate a discussion among Maryland Secretary of the Environment, Benjamin H. Grumbles and Dr. Donald Boesch, Professor of Marine Science, President of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES) until September 2017. Jacqueline Patterson, Director of the NAACP Environment and Climate Justice Program has been invited and confirmation is pending.

The next film, The Ashes, also a NatGeo film, is directed by Michael Bonifiglio, and funded by Bloomberg Philanthropies.  The devastating impacts of coal mining, storing and exporting are vividly shown. The film presents the divergent views between the miners, environmentalists, and government policy makers.

Next up are three films presented together that present the dangers we face on our treasured bay and shoreline.

Waterman, directed by Jess Jacklin, presents a portrait of her grandfather Harry and his relationship to the Chesapeake Bay. After writing songs for over 50 years spent out on the water, Harry performs at the Waterfowl Festival for the first time at age 87. The film follows his journey- a last attempt to save the bay advocating through his music, aiming to remind us all of what’s at stake.

In The Ballad of Holland Island House, director by Lynn Tomlinson uses clay-on-glass animation to tell the true story of the last house on a sinking island in the Chesapeake Bay, off Tilghman Island.

In High Tide In Dorchester, writer and narrator Tom Horton recalls hitting softballs with friends in front of his dad’s hunting and fishing cabin on the Honga River in lower Dorchester County.  Today, the ballfield is four feet underwater and 200 feet from the shoreline.  The film addresses the lack of adequate planning needed to meet the imminent challenges of living on the edges of a rising tide.

The discussion following this trilogy of films will be moderated by Brian Ambrette, Coastal Resilience Manager, Eastern Shore Land Conservancy, and includes William C. “Bill” Boicourt, Professor Emeritus, Horn Point Laboratory UMCES, Tom Horton, Writer, High Tide In Dorchester; David Harp, Director, High Tide in Dorchester; Jess Jacklin, Director, Waterman (and her Grandad appears in the film), and Laura Seltzer-Duny, Director, The Last Boat Out.

Following a late afternoon reception, at 7 p.m.Oyster, an Australian film directed by Kim Beamish screens. It tells the story of a passionate Australian  oyster farmer who swears that the water is getting warmer and the storms more severe.  The only oyster legal for them to grow is the gourmet’s delight, the Sydney Rock Oyster. The story follows his work to keep a few million oysters alive, and necessary decisions to deal with the pressures of climate change and environmental damage, and their  far reaching consequences.

And finally, Al Gore’s film, An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power, a sequel to An Inconvenient Truth, addresses the progress made to persuade government leaders to invest in renewable energy, culminating in the landmark signing of the 2016 Paris Climate Agreement. This film will be shown at the Easton Premier Cinemas on Saturday, October 28, at 9:30 p.m., and on Sunday, October 29 at 1 p.m.  In Cambridge, the screening is on October 29 at 7:45 p.m.

The Avalon Theater is the Chesapeake Film Festival headquarters, with satellite venues at the Art Academy Museum, Talbot County Public Library, and Easton & Cambridge Premier Cinemas.  Tickets are reasonably priced: $12 per film, or $50 for a full day program.  Friday Opening Night tickets are $30. Saturday and Sunday programs combined are $85.   For further information about all films and special events, and to purchase tickets, visit www.chesapeakefilmfestival.com.

The Chesapeake Film Festival welcomes public support with sponsorships and program advertisements.  Please contact executivedirector@chesapeakefilmfestival.com to support its mission.

Mark the Date: 10th Chesapeake Film Festival to Begin on October 27

The 10th Anniversary Chesapeake Film Festival brings filmmakers and a diverse audience of film enthusiasts to Easton for the region’s only weekend event that features independent films. Some critics call independent films the most important art form of the 21st century. Audiences have the chance to engage in critical discourse about the film, often with the filmmaker present.

The Avalon Theater is the Chesapeake Film Festival headquarters, with satellite venues at the Academy Art Museum, Talbot County Public Library, and Easton & Cambridge Premier Cinemas. Tickets are reasonably priced, $12 per film; $50 for one day; and $85 for an all-access pass. A special opening film and party is $30. For further information about all films, day and all-access passes, special events, and tickets please visit www.chesapeakefilmfestival.com.

Opening night, October 27th, begins at the Troika Gallery with a Greek-themed cocktail party before a short walk to the Avalon Theatre to enjoy the comedy Swing Away. Filmed mostly in Greece, it is about professional golfer Zoe Papadopolus who travels to her grandparent’s village in Greece to escape the harsh spotlight of the women’s professional golf tour. Actor John O’Hurley (remember Seinfeld’s Mr. Peterman?) stars in the movie. An avid golfer himself, upper level Festival sponsors are invited to play golf with O’Hurley at the Talbot County Country Club.

Because environmental concerns are integral to the Eastern Shore across the political spectrum, Saturday, October 28th is a full day of documentaries with climate change as a common theme. A partnership with the Eastern Shore Land Conservancy brings substantive expertise to the film discussions. Viewers will see the power of documentary filmmaking in understanding this widely discussed and often contentious topic. Discussion will be interspersed between films moderated by Stuart Clarke, Executive Director, Town Creek Foundation. Experts include Maryland Secretary of the Environment, Benjamin H. Grumbles; Dr. Donald Boesch, Professor of Marine Science and president of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, 1990-2017; Dr. William C. “Bill” Boicourt, Professor Emeritus, Horn Point Laboratory, UMECS; and Brian Ambrette, Coastal Resilience Manager at the Eastern Shore Land Conservancy.

The film sequence begins with National Geographic’s, Before the Flood, produced by Martin Scorsese, in which actor Leonardo DiCaprio meets with scientists worldwide to discuss the impacts of climate change. From the Ashes presents the voices from all sides of the debate about the coal industry as alternative energy gains steam. The coal industry provides tens of thousands of jobs to America’s blue-collar backbone. Regrettably, it is also the single largest source of the carbon dioxide emissions contributing to global warming, and public health officials warn of the myriad risks of mining and burning coal.

High Tide in Dorchester, written and narrated by Tom Horton, directed by Dave Harp, and produced by Sandy Cannon-Brown addresses the lack of adequate planning needed to meet the imminent challenges of living on the edges of a rising tide. Two shorts, The Ballad of Holland Island House produced by Lynn Tomlinson and The Waterman produced by Jess Jacklin, are touchingly intimate portrayals of our local legacy.

On Sunday, October 29th at the Art Academy Museum, the Festival will screen AlphaGo about an artificial intelligence; hosts a student film showcase featuring young filmmakers from Easton High School who are learning filmmaking under the guidance of instructor Garnette Hines. Hines will join Lori Snyder, Executive Director of Arts Education in Maryland Schools (AEMS), and filmmakers to discuss student engagement in this art form. The Festival closes with William Wyler: The Films & The Music, presented by Dr. Rachel Franklin. After the last film, an awards ceremony and cocktail party will close the Festival.

The Chesapeake Film Festival welcomes public support with sponsorships and program advertisements.