Kevin Hayes Discusses “George Washington: A Life in Books” Oct. 23

Few Americans think of the nation’s founding father as a writer, or an avid reader. More often than not, we picture George Washington as a vigorous leader astride a horse, commanding an army, or crossing stormy rivers in the cold of night. Kevin Hayes’s prize-winning narrative, George Washington: A Life in Books, dismisses these popular images of Washington as a man of all action and no ideas or learning. By examining Washington’s personal library, his reading notes, and his personal journals, Hayes shows how books influenced the development of Washington’s intellect, his character and leadership skills, and by extension, the development of a new nation.

Hayes, who won the 2018 George Washington Prize, will speak about his book at Washington College on Tuesday, October 23 at 5:15 p.m. in Hynson Lounge, Hodson Hall. A book signing will begin at 4:30 p.m. A reception will be held after the talk. Hosted by the Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience, all events are free and open to the public.

The full schedule for the Washington Prize celebration follows:

• 4:30 – 5:00 p.m. Book signing with Kevin Hayes
• 5:15 – 6:15 p.m. “Making History: A Conversation with Kevin Hayes and Adam Goodheart”
• 6:15 p.m. Public reception.

In awarding Hayes the prize, a jury of noted historians praised him for revealing a new side of Washington, by “uncovering an intellectual curiosity that dozens of previous biographers have missed.” Adam Goodheart, the Starr Center’s Hodson Trust Griswold director says: “A Life in Books demonstrates that while Washington never attended college and felt self-conscious about his lack of formal education compared to some of his peers, he was a broadly inquisitive man who found pleasure as well as instruction in books.”

Hayes’s project began with a fellowship that he received in 2008 from Washington College’s Starr Center. The award allowed him to spend a month working with rare volumes at the Boston Athenaeum, which holds a large portion of George Washington’s personal library.

The recipient of numerous research fellowships, Hayes is emeritus professor of English at University of Central Oklahoma. His interests in literature and American history intersect in his publications The Road to Monticello: The Life and Mind of Thomas Jefferson (2008) and A Journey through American Literature (2012).As a graduate student at the University of Delaware he studied under Professor J. A. Leo Lemay, a leading scholar of early American literature. Hayes lives and writes in Toledo, Ohio.

The George Washington Prize campus celebration is co-sponsored by Washington College Department of History, American Studies Program, Department of English, Sophie Kerr Committee, and Phi Alpha Theta, the College chapter of the national history honors society.

The $50,000 Washington Prize was awarded to Hayes at a black-tie dinner at George Washington’s Mount Vernon Estate in May. Sponsored by Washington College, the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, and Mount Vernon, the Washington Prize is one of the largest literary prizes in the nation. Awarded annually for the year’s best written work about America’s founding era, it particularly recognizes works that contribute to a broad public understanding of the American past.

Established in 2005, the George Washington Prize has honored a dozen leading writers on the Revolutionary era including the Tony Award winner Lin-Manuel Miranda and Pulitzer Prize winning historians Annette Gordon-Reed and Alan Taylor.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Washington College Alumna Caryn York to Speak on Oct. 8

Fifty-three years ago, millions of Americans descended on the National Mall for the “March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom” to hear Martin Luther King Jr.’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech, in which he called for racial and economic justice denied to millions of black Americans. Today, 50 years after King’s assassination, the same fight continues for millions of Americans, even in the blue-ish state of Maryland.

In an Oct. 8 visit as part of the Goldstein Program’s Young Alumni Series, Caryn York, executive director of the Job Opportunities Task Force, will discuss the implications of prior and existing public policy decisions that threaten the possibility of King’s dream ever fully becoming a reality.

The event in Hynson Lounge, Hodson Hall, begins at 5:30 and is free and open to the public.

York is the first African American woman to lead the Job Opportunities Task Force, an independent, statewide nonprofit organization that promotes policies and programs to help low-wage workers advance to high-wage jobs. In her role, York encourages key policymakers and stakeholders to adopt and support policies and programs that eliminate educational and employment barriers and facilitate the successful entry, or re-entry, of low-wage workers.

She has been instrumental in leading numerous state and local policy reform efforts including, but not limited to, “Ban the Box” on job and college applications, expansion of criminal record expungement and shielding laws, postsecondary access and affordability, and reducing the impact of incarceration on working families through development, passage, and implementation of the Maryland Justice Reinvestment Act and statewide bail reform.

York majored in international studies at Washington College and has worked within state and local politics for over 10 years.

The Goldstein Program’s Young Alumni Series was established in 2011 to highlight the accomplishments of talented alumni working in public affairs, and to foster connections between alumni and current students. Once a semester, the program sponsors a tea and talk for students and alumni and a public lecture featuring a recent alumnus.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Andrew Lawler to Discuss His Book “The Secret Token” Oct. 4

The ultimate fate of the more than 100 men, women, and children who landed on Roanoke Island in 1587, with the intent to establish a European settlement in the New World, has been one of the greatest mysteries in American history. Within a few years, the settlers vanished, leaving behind a single clue: a secret token etched into a tree.

In his new book, The Secret Token: Myth, Obsession, and the Search for the Lost Colony of Roanoke, author Andrew Lawler sets out to probe our national need to know. His narrative of America’s oldest unsolved mystery and the people racing to unearth its answer exposes sobering truths about race, gender, and immigration, and ultimately, why historical myths matter.

Lawler will present a book talk and signing on Thursday, Oct. 4 at 5:30 p.m. in Litrenta Lecture Hall, Toll Science Center, at Washington College. Sponsored by the Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience, the program is free and open to the public.

Colorful characters, past and present, populate Lawler’s account, from English knight Sir Walter Raleigh and the Croatoan Indian, Manteo, to archeologist Ivor Noel Hume and Fred Willard, a “maverick Lost Colony seeker.” Digging deep into the archival and archeological evidence, Lawler has written what Publisher’s Weekly hails as “part detective novel, part historical reckoning. . . leading to a thoughtful and timely discourse about race and identity.”

Lawler, the Starr Center’s 2016 – 2017 Hodson Trust-John Carter Brown fellow, is the author of the highly acclaimed Why Did the Chicken Cross the World?. He is a contributing writer for Science, a contributing editor for Archaeology Magazine, and has written for The New York Times, The Washington Post, National Geographic, Smithsonian, and Slate.His book The Secret Token was written in part while in residence in Washington College’s 18th-century Patrick Henry House on Queen Street in Chestertown.

The Hodson Trust-John Carter Brown Library Fellowship

The Starr Center administers the fellowship in partnership with the John Carter Brown Library at Brown University, one of the nation’s oldest and most prestigious institutions for the study of early America. Founded with a $1 million endowment from The Hodson Trust, the fellowship supports work on significant projects related to the literature, history, culture, or art of the Americas before 1830. Now in its fifth year, it welcomes submissions not only from traditional historians, but also from filmmakers, novelists, and creative and performing artists. washcoll.edu/centers/starr/fellowships

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Washington College Poets Win Two Major National Poetry Awards

A second-year English faculty member and an alumna who is now assistant director at the Rose O’Neill Literary House each have earned two top national literary awards in poetry. Kimberly Quiogue Andrews, assistant professor of English and creative writing, has won the 2018 Akron Poetry Prize for her first full-length collection,A Brief History of Fruit, while Lindsay Lusby ’08 has won the 2018 Agha Shahid Ali Prize, awarded by the University of Utah Press, for her first full-length collection, Catechesis: a postpastoral.

“It is a testament to the talented writing community fostered here at Washington College that we can celebrate not one but two incredible poetic achievements,” says James Allen Hall, director of the Rose O’Neill Literary House, associate professor of English, and award-winning poet and essayist. “Each of these prizes—the Akron Prize and the Agha Shahid Ali Prize—are nationally competitive prizes with presses that make beautiful and award-winning books. One of Akron’s books was a finalist for the National Book Award in poetry last year, for instance. I feel honored to work with both of these poets and thrilled that poetry is thriving at Washington College.”

In its announcement of the 2018 Akron Prize, the University of Akron Press describes A Brief History of Fruitas shuttling “between the United States and the Philippines in the search for a sense of geographical and racial belonging. Driven by a restless need to interrogate the familial, environmental, and political forces that shape the self, these poems are both sensual and cerebral … Colonization, class dynamics, an abiding loneliness, and a place’s titular fruit—tiny Filipino limes, the frozen berries of rural America—all serve as focal markers in a book that insists that we hold life’s whole fragrant pollination in our hands and look directly at it, bruises and all.”

Kimberly Quiogue Andrews and Lindsay Lusby

This year’s judge, Diane Suess, selected Quiogue Andrews’s collection from 687 entries, calling it a “superb collection” that “offers up history—personal, familial, post-colonial, geo-political, ecological—and indeed the history of fruit, fruit as sustenance, pleasure, exploitable product, as image, parent, love, and wound… The formal variety is remarkable without calling too much attention to itself . . . the experiments arise organically from each poem’s purpose and particular emotional hue.”

Quiogue Andrews’s BETWEEN won the 2017 New Women’s Voices Prize from Finishing Line Press, and she is a two-time Academy of American Poets prize winner and a Pushcart nominee. Her poems have appeared in Poetry Northwest, Grist, West Branch, Nat. Brut, The Shallow Ends, and Tinderbox Poetry Journal, among others. Her essays and criticism have appeared in the Los Angeles Review of Books, ASAP/J, and elsewhere.

Kimiko Hahn selected Lusby’s Catechesis: a postpastoral, and the University of Utah will publish the book in June 2019. Lusby is invited to read as part of the University of Utah’s Guest Writers Series from the Department of English.

In Catechesis: a postpastoral , Lusby poses the question: If Clarice Starling and Ellen Ripley could warn the girls and women to follow, what would they tell us? The work combines Grimm fairy tale with understated horror movie and the Book of Revelation to construct a vision of the lush green dangers and apocalyptic transformations inherent in girlhood. This lyric lore, which includes strange diagrams and collages of the botanical and the anatomical, contains hidden instruction to prepare girls for the hazards ahead. The manuscript was a finalist for the 2018 Dorset Prize at Tupelo Press and a semi-finalist for the 2018 Brittingham & Felix Pollak Prizes at the University of Wisconsin Press.

Catechsis by Lindsay Lusby is a daring and true debut collection,” said Kimiko Hahn in judging the award.

Lusby, assistant editor for the Literary House Press and managing editor for Cherry Treeis also the author of two chapbooks, Blackbird Whitetail Redhand (Porkbelly Press, 2018) and Imago (dancing girl press, 2014), and the winner of the 2015 Fairy Tale Review Poetry Contest. Her poems have appeared most recently in Passages NorthThe Account, North Dakota QuarterlyTinderbox Poetry JournalFairy Tale Review, and elsewhere. Her visual poems have appeared in Dream Pop Press and Duende.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

John Seidel to Speak on Sustainable Bay Future on Oct. 3

John Seidel, Director of Washington College’s Center for Environment & Society (CES), will discuss how Eastern Shore residents can play a pivotal role in preserving the Chesapeake Bay watershed at a presentation Oct. 3 at the Talbot Country Club in Easton.

Seidel will present “Living Landscapes: Linking Land, Water, and People for a Sustainable Future” at the event, which is open to the public for a fee of $15 and includes a reception that begins at 5:30 p.m.

As director of the CES, Seidel is at the forefront of the College’s efforts to bring the human and societal elements together within the environmental equation. Balancing natural systems and human communities so that each can thrive is an overarching goal to achieving a healthy Chesapeake Bay and Bay watershed. From restoring habitat that brought back the region’s quail, to operating the only bird-banding station on the upper Eastern Shore that provides critical long-term data on bird migration, to providing students myriad opportunities to study the complex ecology and culture of the Bay, CES is helping to solve sustainability challenges by integrating environmental issues and social values.

Seidel is also an associate professor of anthropology and environmental studies and conducts the College’s summer program in archaeology.

Washington College and Talbot Country Club are co-sponsoring the presentation at 6142 Country Club Drive, Easton, Maryland. The $15 fee pays for the reception and admittance, and is payable by credit card or check to Talbot Country Club at the event. Washington College is not accepting payments. Please RSVP by Sept. 28 to Victoria Corcoran at 410-778-7805 or vcorcoran2@washcoll.edu.

Historian Robert Parkinson to Speak at Washington College Sept. 13

During the summer of 1774, a Marylander named Michael Cresap was accused of the grisly massacre of Mingo Indians on the banks of the Ohio River. Although mystery continues to shroud the so-called Yellow Creek Massacre, the incident touched off events that helped fuel the outbreak of the American Revolution.

On Thursday, September 13, historian Robert Parkinson will discuss the legacy of this traumatic event. Cosponsored by the Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience and the Rose O’Neill Literary House, the program is free and open to the public. The lecture begins at 5:30 p.m. in Hynson Lounge, Hodson Hall, Washington College.

Parkinson, an associate professor of history at Binghamton University whose research, writing, and teaching focus on war and race in colonial and revolutionary America, is the Starr Center’s 2018-2019 Patrick Henry Fellow. His first book, the critically acclaimed The Common Cause: Creating Race and Nation in the American Revolution (North Carolina Press, 2016),won multiple prizes, including the Organization of American Historians’ distinguished James A. Rawley Prize, awarded to the best book of the year on U.S. race relations. After earning his Ph.D. at the University of Virginia, Parkinson was a postdoctoral fellow at the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture at the College of William & Mary.

During his time in Chestertown, Parkinson will be working on his new book, The Heart of American Darkness: Savagery, Civility, and Murder on the Eve of the American Revolution. The book traces the story of the Yellow Creek Massacre, along with how this horrific incident was remembered and mythologized over the next several decades. Resonating with Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, Parkinson’s book will explore the 18th-century Ohio River Valley as another “dark place of the Earth,” revealing how the discourse of “savagery” and “civility” informed the American Revolution and nation’s founding ideas.

“This is a story of empire-on-the-make, of exploitation and cruelty, of death and derangement, of a strange river that opens up lands of potential and desire, of reputations made ‘out there,’” Parkinson says. “Further, it is a story that weighs heavily on our clean division between who is ‘savage’ and who is ‘civil.’”

Parkinson will be based at college’s 18th-century Custom House on the banks of the Chester River. In the spring, he will teach a class at Washington College.

About the Patrick Henry Fellowship:

Launched by the Starr Center in 2008, the Patrick Henry Fellowship aims to encourage reflection on the links between American history and contemporary culture, and to foster the literary art of historical writing. It is co-sponsored by the Rose O’Neill Literary House, Washington College’s center for literature and the literary arts. The Patrick Henry Writing Fellowship’s funding is permanently endowed by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, with further support provided by the Starr Foundation, the Hodson Trust, and other donors.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Solo Exhibit Featuring Amber Robles-Gordon at WC’s Kohl Gallery

The Kohl Gallery at Washington College kicks off the 2018-19 academic year with a solo exhibit titled Material-isms: the cultivation of womanhood and agency through materiality, featuring Washington, D.C.-based mixed-media artist Amber Robles-Gordon. The exhibit features assemblage and installation works created from a range of found objects and textiles.

Opening on Thursday, September 6, with a public reception from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m., Material-ismswill run through October 10. Robles-Gordon will also deliver a public talk in the gallery on Thursday, September 13, at 3:00 p.m.

Robles-Gordon’s broad artistic practice draws upon the often-paradoxical experiences of her gender, ethnicity, and social and cultural influences, including her Latino, African and Caribbean heritage. What the artist calls “hybridism” is reflected in her varied material strategies and vibrant use of color, often invoking a spiritual and energetic sensibility. “Materials intrigue me, but colors uplift and excite me,” Robles-Gordon said in a 2017 interview with Bmore Art Magazine.Material-isms will highlight Robles-Gordon’s spirited use of a bold color palette in a series of mixed-media and installation works that conjure themes of femininity and masculinity, duality, spirituality, and the natural and cultural environment.

Robles-Gordon earned her MFA from Howard University and has over 15 years of experience as a practicing artist, curator, and arts educator. Her work has been reviewed or featured in the Washington Post, Washington City Paper, Hyperallergic, Huffington Post, ebony.com, The Miami Herald, Bmore Art Magazine, Support Black Art, and Callaloo: Art and Culture in the African Diaspora, among other publications.

Robles-Gordon’s work has been exhibited throughout the U.S. and in Germany, Italy, Malaysia, London, and Spain. She has created temporary and public installations for the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities, the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Association, Howard University, The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Washington Project for the Arts, Salisbury University, and Martha’s Table. In 2012, Robles-Gordon was selected for Under the Influence, in association with the Corcoran Gallery of Art’s 30 Americans exhibit. As an arts advocate, Robles-Gordon has served the Washington D.C. regional arts community as an active member of Black Artists DC, serving as exhibitions coordinator, vice-president, and president. She is also the co-founder of Delusions of Grandeur Artist Collective.

Kohl Gallery is located on the first floor of the Gibson Center for the Arts at Washington College in Chestertown, Maryland. The gallery is open Wednesday through Friday 1:30 to 5:30 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday noon to 4 p.m. For more information, please email: kohl_gallery@washcoll.edu.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

WC Student Helps Community Residents Preserve African American History

The first time she set foot in what was then the brand-new National Museum of African American History and Culture, Paris Young was in high school, and she knew that she wanted to work there one day. She just didn’t think that opportunity would come as soon as her freshman year of college.

“At one point in time, African American history wasn’t preserved. And we didn’t have documentation,” says Young, who is majoring in political science with minors in justice, law, and society and black studies. “A lot of people don’t even think what they have is something special. It’s just sitting in people’s attics. People don’t think, ‘This is important for my great- great-grandchildren.’ But once those pictures are gone, they are gone. And that’s why I think this project is important.”

Young’s work is also laying the groundwork for a major Starr Center initiative. During two visits to Chestertown, Lonnie Bunch, founding director of the new Smithsonian museum, began working with the center and local leaders to develop what has been dubbed the Chesapeake Heartland Project, an innovative digital archive that will preserve and share Kent County’s African American history.

Irene Moore of Georgetown, Md., and Paris Young. Credit: Washington College

“While still in its initial phase, this project has brought the College and community together to celebrate the unique African American history of the Chesapeake Bay region,” says Pat Nugent, deputy director of the Starr Center. “And Paris is right there at the middle of everything, meeting with church members, store owners, and community organizers in Kent County, as well as program directors, curators, and historians on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.”

One community member, 80-year-old Irene Moore of Georgetown, covered the table at the Starr Center conference room with photos and newspaper clippings. Many of them documented a racially segregated one-room schoolhouse in Worton Point, built in 1890, that she attended from kindergarten through fifth grade.

Young says she didn’t even know the internship at the museum existed when she received an email from Nugent encouraging her to apply. History Professor Carol Wilson and College Dean Patrice DiQuinzio had recommended her based on her enthusiasm and talent for interpreting African American history, whether in her pre-orientation program focused on Harriet Tubman or Wilson’s introductory history course on the Underground Railroad.

Now that Paris is an intern at the National Museum of African American History and Culture, she’s soaking up all she can while constantly meeting new people and making new contacts.

“I’m working with curators and conservators because I have to actually know what I’m doing with the materials. And I’m talking to community members,” she says. All the interns work in the same room, so they share stories with each other about what they’re working on. “It’s really fun, it’s really hectic. The line of visitors always wraps all the way around the corner, every single day, and my boss is super cool, super open. It’s just very fun.”

A member of the Black Student Union and Cleopatra’s Sisters, Young wants to be a lawyer specializing in civil rights. She says the internship is teaching her communication, team-building, and public outreach skills she knows will be helpful in the future.

“I like to work by myself, I’m a very self-sufficient person, so by doing this I’ve noticed that I have other skills that I haven’t tapped into yet. It’s possible for me to work with 20 people and not go insane because there’s so many people talking to me at once. I’m actually balancing everything well for myself because I usually don’t do this type of work,” she says. “This project has made me more outgoing and given me abilities I will most definitely use when I go to law school.”

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

In Residence at the Starr Center, Writer Cam Terwilliger is Finishing His First Historical Novel

What was life like two centuries ago in the forested Iroquois country, a place where cultures met and frequently clashed?  It takes considerable literary skill to craft a historical novel that brings to life a society living on the edge of the Western wilderness. Evoking the beauty, danger, and wonder of the 18th-century American frontier requires a keen imagination, diligent research, an empathy for character, an affinity for place, and the ability to tell a good tale. Author Cam Terwilliger has honed these skills as he nears completion of his first novel, Yet Wilderness Grew in My Heart.

An accomplished fiction writer, journalist, editor, and teacher, Terwilliger is the 2018-19 Hodson Trust-John Carter Brown Library Fellow, in residence this summer at Washington College’s Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience. The Brooklyn-based writer’s work has been published by literary magazines including NarrativeAmerican Short FictionGettysburg Review, and Post Road. Terwilliger teaches creative writing at Seton Hall University and serves as associate fiction editor for Bucknell University’s literary magazine, West Branch. He holds an MFA from Emerson College.

Set in New York and Quebec during the French and Indian War (also known as The Seven Years War), Terwilliger’s book reimagines the mythology of the founding of America, exploring issues of race, religion, capitalism, disease, landscape, the psychology of power, and the dense web of cultures that gave rise to the world we live in today.

The historical novel delves into an intermingling of cultures—Native American, European, and African—dramatizing the lives of the diverse characters who populate his story.The narrator is a wealthy physician who, suffering from syphilis, desperately seeks a natural cure in the fields and forests of the Hudson River valley. Then there’s a counterfeiter who escaped from slavery in New York City and is hiding out in the wilderness — and his wife, an enigmatic Mohawk woman.

Evoking a sense of place is important to Terwilliger’s writing. In the course of researching Yet Wilderness Grew in My Heart, Terwilliger spent time living in Montreal and upstate New York, where the story takes place. While visiting the Mohawk community of Kahnawà:ke outside Montreal, Terwilliger drew inspiration from the rich resources of KORLCC, the community’s language and cultural center. By studying in the center’s library, attending cultural events, and talking with members of the Mohawk community, Terwilliger worked to deepen the perspective of his narrative.

The Starr Center’s Hodson Trust-John Carter Brown Library Fellowship supported two months of research at the John Carter Brown Library in Providence, R.I. Terwilliger took a deep dive into rare 18th-century documents, including accounts of colonists seeking possible Native American cures for syphilis, as well as an early bestseller by a counterfeiter who wrote about his crimes and adventures.

After finishing the research portion of his fellowship, Terwillger arrived at Washington College in June where—living in the circa 1735 Patrick Henry House on Queen Street and working at the circa-1746 Custom House—he is enthused to revise and refine his manuscript in the colonial surrounds of Chestertown’s historical district.

“It’s a beautiful place to write a novel about the 18th century,” says Terwilliger. “The surroundings are peaceful, spacious, and inspirational. Fiction writers don’t usually have a lot of support for archival research, and that combined with two months of writing time in a place like Chestertown, makes the Hodson Trust-John Carter Brown Library Fellowship unique and valuable.”

The Starr Center cosponsors the fellowship with the John Carter Brown Library at Brown University, one of the nation’s oldest and most prestigious institutions for the study of early America. Endowed with a major grant from The Hodson Trust, it supports work on significant projects related to the literature, history, culture, or art of the Americas before 1830. The fellowship welcomes submissions not only from traditional historians, but also from filmmakers, novelists, and creative and performing artists.  For more information, please see https://www.washcoll.edu/centers/starr/fellowships/hodson-brown-fellowship.php

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

WC Announces New Scholarship For Students Pursuing Interests in Ornithology

Marking the 20th anniversary of the Foreman’s Branch Bird Observatory and the Year of the Bird, Washington College has announced a new scholarship for students who are interested in the science and study of birds. The Washington College Ornithology Scholarship will be awarded to two students in the incoming class of 2023, providing each $1,500 a year for four years.

The scholarship will help students take advantage of the unique opportunities that Washington College offers in birding and ornithology at Foreman’s Branch Bird Observatory. The only observatory of its kind on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, Foreman’s Branch is one of the few places where undergraduate students can receive long-term, hands-on training in the technical skills needed for ornithology studies.

Since 2008, the station has provided paid internships to 26 students, who are closely taught the precise skills needed to band, identify, and record data about songbirds. Student interns spend an entire semester (and often much more) at the station learning these skills while being closely mentored by master banders. Scholarship recipients will get priority status for these internships.

WC students and interns in front of Foreman’s Branch Bird Observatory.

Located on the College’s 4,700-acre River and Field Campus (RAFC), Foreman’s Branch is an Audubon-designated Important Bird Area. The expansive habitat at RAFC, and the fact that the observatory is not located at migratory bottleneck, draws an enormous diversity of species.

On average, the station bands about 15,000 birds of about 130 species every year, and as of January 2018, it holds North American age records for 10 species, including orchard oriole (11 years), American goldfinch (10 years, 11 months), hermit thrush (10 years, 10 months), and grasshopper sparrow (9 years, 1 month).Last September, the station, which celebrated its 20th anniversary in March, banded its 250,000th bird, a common yellow throat.

The Washington College Ornithology Scholarship, which is funded by the College’s Center for Environment & Society, is being launched during the Year of the Bird, designated by the National Audubon Society, BirdLife International, National Geographic, and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology to mark the 100th anniversary of the signing of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

For more information about the Washington College Ornithology Scholarship, visit https://www.washcoll.edu/centers/ces/ornithology-scholarship/

Learn more about Foreman’s Branch Bird Observatory at www.washcoll.edu/birds

For more about Year of the Bird visit http://www.audubon.org/yearofthebird

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.