Food Friday: Metropolitan Ice Creams

It is shaping up to be a hot summer. Which is a good thing. It gives us something to reflect upon fondly when we are scraping ice off our windshields in February. Mr. Friday and I will remember the week we just spent vacationing in New York City, where the heat was hellish, the sidewalks were soft and sticky, and there was an endless parade of cooling, delicious summer ice creams forever strutting before us, beckoning us, luring us with chilly, sweet siren songs. And as good tourists, we obliged by eating as much ice cream as we could.

July is National Ice Cream Month. Thus our gobbling up ice cream was not only good manners, it was patriotic. Since we missed this week’s ticker tape parade down the Canyon of Heroes for the U.S. Women’s National Team’s victory lap, I’m glad to say we celebrated the international competition of ice creams with gusto. Cautionary tale: since coming home, I have taken my plump little self back to the gym every damn day. But it was worth it.

On our first day in New York we ambled over to the west side, up on the High Line, and under the hulk of The Vessel, the new M.C. Esher-like landmark built for photo ops and tourist initiations to pedestrian challenges. https://www.hudsonyardsnewyork.com/discover/vessel The Vessel stands in the once industrial Hudson Yards, where Long Island railroad cars are stored before they make their return journey. Now there is a sleek urban mall with hideously expensive residences which rises above the trains, in a city that already has much of the world’s chic and pricey shopping. Take heart – not every shop is as tony as Neiman Marcus or Cartier. In the lower level you will find the bustling populist world of José Andrés’s Spain.

Our first steps into Andrés’s Mercado Little Spain fed us right into colorful whorl of people, murals, maps, small plates, hams, breads, wines, food cases, and this display of ice cream and ice cream sandwiches. I could not think of anything more divine than these cubic feet of frozen delight. For a more detailed description of this Iberian food paradise, please read Rachel Sugar’s New York Magazine piece: http://www.grubstreet.com/2019/03/jose-andres-mercado-little-spain-hudson-yards-nyc.html

I admire José Andrés’s World Central project where he and his people feed folks who have been stricken by natural disasters. His good work is a lesson to us all. And so I felt justified in supporting him by buying an extravagant ice cream sandwich – before meeting friends uptown for dinner. (Mr. Friday, in the meantime, scarfed down a large plate of paella, in case you wondered.)

Another day of walking the Museum Mile found us battling Stendhal Syndrome: an overwhelming, heart-stopping abundance of gawping and wonder. What can you do? Why not have a gelato or two? After a morning spent in the Planetarium, whizzing around the universe with Neil deGrasse Tyson, and mingling with dinosaurs, the great blue whale and a few grizzly bears at the American Museum of Natural History, we strode across Central Park, and into the Mecca of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. We walked with the Egyptians and sallied into the American Wing to pay obeisance to my favorite painting, John Singer Sargent’s Madame X. https://www.metmuseum.org/en/art/collection/search/12127 The only thing to do after that humbling experience is to find ice cream. As the crush of humanity to get into The American Wing Café was unbearable, we perched on some uncomfortable chairs wedged into the Chinese porcelain collection in The Great Hall Balcony Café and spooned up some fortifying gelato. There must surely be a special place in heaven for the inventors of ice cream! Grazie molto!

On our last night we got gussied up and strolled around the Lincoln Center complex, sad that we had not booked tickets for My Fair Lady. Instead we watched little girls in tulle tutus chasing each other around the spouting fountain, while member of various orchestras rushed by, clad in black, hauling their instruments across the marble plaza. Then we ambled north to our restaurant, Café Luxembourg, for a final night of cosmopolitan living. I had a French 75 cocktail, which is always best when served on a silver tray by an obliging waiter.

Mr. Friday had Wellfleet oysters and classic moules frites; I had steak frites, because there was not going to be any frite sharing, I can promise you. But we did split an adorable serving of profiteroles, which were made with ice cream, and not the crème pâtissière we had expected, and it was a sweet and cool way to end our vacation. Tired and happy, heady with wine and frites and sweets. We loved New York.

(And thank you very much, Chef Andrés, for this helpful culinary hint:”Buy the best quality sorbet or ice cream from a local ice-cream maker. It’s the perfect ending.”)

“What’s the use of a great city having temptations if fellows don’t yield to them?”
― P.G. Wodehouse

QACA Hails Balloon Release Legislation

July 9, Centreville–Queen Anne’s Conservation Association (QACA), the oldest environmental group on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, today announced its strong support for pending legislation prohibiting the release of non-biodegradable helium balloons into the atmosphere.

“Deflated mylar and latex balloons, and the ribbons they’re attached to, are rapidly accumulating in the environment, maiming and killing wildlife, sea creatures, and farm animals,” said QACA’s Executive Director Jay Falstad. “We applaud the Queen Anne’s County Commissioners for taking the lead against this increasing, but readily preventable, form of environmental pollution.”

The balloon release ordinance, first in the State, was introduced by Commissioner Christopher M. Corchiarino before the Board of the Queen Anne’s County Commissioners on July 9. A hearing is expected for July 23rd. The bill provides for fines of up to $250 for deliberate violations of the prohibition on balloon releases.

“Intentionally releasing balloons into the atmosphere is nothing short of littering”, said Commissioner Corchiarino.  “This ordinance will allow us to protect a cross-section of interests in the County while furthering the stewardship of our waterways and rural landscapes”.

Kristin Weed of Kent Island Beach CleanUps said balloons are always part of the trash collected during the organization’s beach clean-up efforts.

“We find clusters of balloons during every single beach or road cleanup,” she said.  “They’re usually stuck in trees or bay grasses, on the beach, and in ditches along our county roads.”

On Unicorn Lake, in northern Queen Anne’s County, balloons were found that had been released in Dayton, Ohio, four days earlier and had traveled some 460 miles.

“Balloons are often mistaken for food by marine animals such as turtles and birds,” Falstad said. “These creatures then become tangled in the ribbons and are killed.  If balloons from the Midwest are reaching the East Coast, then balloons released from the East Coast are ending up in the Atlantic Ocean.”

Alerted to the balloon problem, Falstad reached out to sailors, boating enthusiasts, and off-shore fishing organizations and learned that they have spotted clusters of helium balloons floating miles off-shore along the Atlantic Coast.

Released helium balloons pose a problem for the agricultural community, as well.  In an online survey Falstad created, farmland owners reported deflated balloons in their fields, requiring farmers to retrieve the balloons in order to prevent them from being entangled in equipment.
 Queen Anne’s farm owner Clara Bramble said runaway balloons pose a risk to their animals.

“When balloons land in our pastures, the cows—and especially calves—can ingest them and the balloon strings can cause choking,” Bramble said.  “The horses and foals are also at risk, and I’ve witnessed horses being spooked by shiny balloons landing in our fields and seeing a horse run through a fence to get away from the balloons.”

Wye Mills farmer Jon Shaw says they recover at least 50 clusters of balloons a year.

“We find them almost every week,” Shaw said. “Balloons spook our horses, they get trapped in our hedgerows, and get wrapped in our equipment all the time.”

“The bill doesn’t apply to the six-year-old kid who accidentally releases a balloon at a birthday party,” Falstad said.  “What it does is raise awareness, and tell people to be thoughtful, because these colorful, non-biodegradable balloons are a serious form of environmental pollution. We’re one county, but this is a nationwide problem, and balloons in trees or farm-fields, or the Chesapeake Bay or any other waterway are a significant, if not widely realized, environmental threat.”

Contact: Jay Falstad, 410-739-6570 – jay.falstad@qaca.org

This Weekend in Easton – July 12 – 14, 2019

The Talbot Spy shares with its readers each week Discover Easton’s “This Weekend in Easton” events newsletter. Each edition takes a look at the community events going on in Easton for the coming weekend, and highlights Signature Events hosted by Discover Easton. From shows at the Avalon Theatre, fundraisers, art exhibits, in-store promotions, festivals, and more, there is always something to do in Easton, Maryland.

 

Talbot County Fair
July 11 to July 13
Talbot Agriculture & Education Center (10659 Hiners Lane)

The Talbot County Fair is held every year during the second week in July. It is open to the public with lots of fun, food, & entertainment. Thurs. is Talbot 1st Responders Day!
More Info & Schedule of Events


Tuckahoe Steam & Gas Show
July 11 to July 14
11472 Ocean Gtwy

A family fun event sharing the history and knowledge of our rural way of life. Demonstrations throughout the week. Lots of good food and special entertainment each day. More Info


Adult Workshop: Nautical Silkscreens
Fri., July 12 | 6 to 8 p.m.
Kiln Born Creations (1 S. Washington St)

Learn how to use silkscreens! A great beginner workshop and the design works on many different pieces. $10 reservation fee. Price varies according to piece. More Info


Let’s Roll Summer Skate Nights
Fri., July 12 | 7:00 p.m.
Talbot Community Center (10028 Ocean Gtwy)

Let’s Roll Summer Skate Nights during special Friday evenings this summer! Live DJ, Snack Bar, & 2-Hours of Open Skating with your family & friends. Rent skates or bring your own. More Info


Farmers Market
Sat., July 13 | 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Public Lot; 100 Block of N. Harrison St

Local produce, nursery stock & bulbs, breads, pastries, handcrafted gifts, Rise Up Coffee, fresh cut flowers, local honey, pet treats, kombucha, rum, and prepared foods. Live music begins at 10:30 a.m. every Saturday. More Info


Bluepoint on the Block Presents Pressing Strings
Sat., July 13 | 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Bluepoint Hospitality (5 Federal St)

This summer, Bluepoint Hospitality hosts a collection of local & regional talent during Live Music Saturdays on Federal Street. More Info


Easton Arts District Culture Crossing
Sat., July 13 | noon to 4:00 p.m.
Rails-to-Trails (Along East Ave between Dover Rd and Goldsborough St)

An artisan’s showcase celebrating the diversity of Easton. An open air style market with art made or performed by locals of different cultures and ethnicities. More Info



All You Can Eat Crab Feast!
Sat., July 13 | 6 p.m.
Hummingbird Inn (14 N Aurora St)

A monthly feast featuring steamed crabs, red potatoes, and corn-on-the-cob at Hummingbird Inn. Cash bars provided by St. Michaels Winery & Hair O’The Dog. Seating is limited, call 410-822-0605! More Info


Plein Air Easton Art Festival
July 14 to July 21

Plein Air Easton is the largest and most prestigious juried plein air painting competition in the United States. Celebrating its 15th year, the competition is held in Easton each July. There will be 58 competing artists painting throughout Talbot County the week of July 14th.
More Info & Schedule of Events

Proposal to Aerate Bay: Breath of Fresh Air or Pipe Dream?

Dan Sheer, founder and president emeritus of a Maryland water resources consulting firm, guides his sailboat up Rock Creek, where aerators have been used since 1988. They successfully dealt with low-oxygen conditions there that generated a rotten egg odor. Bay Journal photo by Timothy Wheeler

What if the dead zone that plagues the Chesapeake Bay could be eliminated now, not years down the road — and at a fraction of the billions being spent annually on restoring the troubled estuary?

Fanciful as it sounds, Dan Sheer figures it’s technically doable. Whether it’s the right thing to do is another question. Bay scientists are wary of potential pitfalls, but some still think it’s worth taking a closer look.

Sheer, founder and president emeritus of HydroLogics, a Maryland-based water resource consulting firm, has suggested that the oxygen-starved area down the center of the Bay could become a thing of the past if enough air could be pumped into the depths and be allowed to bubble up through the water.

“It pretty much gets rid of the problem,” he said during a recent presentation to scientists at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. And it’s not just him saying that. The federal-state Chesapeake Bay Program ran his oxygen-bubbling calculations through the computer model it uses to simulate water quality in the Bay, and the preliminary results appear to back him up.

Algae blooms produce dead zone

The dead zone, as it’s called, is produced when algae blooms fed by excessive nutrients in the water die and decay, consuming the dissolved oxygen that fish, crabs and shellfish need to live. This zone of low to no oxygen forms near the bottom in the deep trough down the center of the Bay every spring and grows through summer, until finally receding in fall when algae growth ends.

The Bay Program has been laboring since the 1980s to reduce nutrient pollution and raise dissolved oxygen levels enough to eliminate the dead zone, but the effort has been costly and challenging.

The region missed two earlier cleanup deadlines and is now working toward another target date of 2025, when all projects and programs needed to meet nutrient reduction goals should be in place. That’s looking increasingly unrealistic as well.

Aerating the Bay would be quicker, Sheer contends, and potentially less expensive. His idea: Lay 16 pipes across the deepest part of the Chesapeake at 5-mile intervals from Maryland’s Bay Bridge to the Potomac River, with a series of openings in them to release streams of tiny air bubbles. The oxygen in the bubbles would dissolve into the water and help sustain aquatic life.

Not a new proposal

Sheer isn’t the first to suggest bubbling the Bay like an aquarium. It’s been brought up repeatedly over the last 30 years, only to be dismissed as unworkable and inordinately expensive — harebrained, even.

In the late 1980s, Maryland tested floating aerators in a cove off the Patuxent River, but gave up after they produced a barely detectable change in oxygen near the bottom.

In 2011, the nonprofit Blue Water Baltimore, in partnership with a consulting firm, placed a small aerator in Baltimore’s harbor, with similar results.

Aeration has been used with some success elsewhere in freshwater lakes and reservoirs that suffer from nutrient pollution. And, it has helped water quality in some rivers, such as the Thames in the United Kingdom.

Pumping air into big open bodies of tidal water is more problematic. Scientists in Sweden and Finland have looked at and tested aeration as a possible remedy for severe algae blooms in the Baltic Sea. But they’ve held back from trying it on a large scale, in part because of uncertainty about its costs and effectiveness.

Given that history, reaction to Sheer’s proposal has been mixed.

Lot of questions

“I’m enthusiastic about the idea in a lot of ways, but there are a lot of questions,” said Bill Ball, director of the Chesapeake Research Consortium, a nonprofit that coordinates Bay studies among seven universities and labs in the region.

Sheer, who holds a doctorate in environmental engineering from Johns Hopkins University, said the idea of aerating the Bay mainstem came to him about 18 months ago while listening to a presentation at UMBC about the costs and complications of the federal-state restoration effort. When he stood up and asked why not try bubbling the dead zone away, he said others in attendance ticked off a litany of flaws they saw in his proposal.

“The room sort of turned into a shooting gallery,” he recalled, “and I was the target. I had lots of objections … ‘you’re fixing the symptoms and not the problem,’ ‘you can’t possibly pump enough air,’ ‘it’s way too expensive, takes too much energy’” and more.

After that, Sheer set out to see if his critics were right.

“It looks like it really will work,” he said.

Working at Rock Creek

 

Sheer pointed out that aeration has long been in use in one small corner of the Bay watershed, where he happens to keep his sailboat.

Rock Creek, a tributary of the Patapsco River near Baltimore, has had aerators since 1988. They were put there in response to complaints about the rotten-egg odor given off by the creek in summer.

A 2014 study by researchers with the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science rated the Rock Creek aerators a success. They raised oxygen levels near the bottom enough to stop hydrogen sulfide from bubbling out of the sediments — another byproduct of low-oxygen conditions.

“The aerators were incredibly effective at restoring dissolved oxygen to the creek,” said Lora Harris, an associate professor at the UMCES Chesapeake Biological Laboratory and lead author of the study. Water quality improved even downstream, she said, nearly to the mouth of the tidally influenced creek.

Rock Creek is relatively shallow and small, compared to the water bodies where aeration has been tested before. The aerators there also were placed on the bottom, rather than floating on the surface.

Aeration has successfully treated low-oxygen conditions in Maryland’s Rock Creek, where they caused a rotten egg odor and prompted complaints from local residents. Anne Arundel County is currently replacing the original aerators at a cost of approximately $1 million. Bay Journal photo by Timothy Wheeler

The Rock Creek aerators cost $285,000 to install and about $7,000 a year to run, according to Janis Markusic, a planner with Anne Arundel County’s watershed restoration office. The county is now replacing the original aerators, she said, to the tune of $1 million.

Might cost $10-20 million

Doing it in the Bay mainstem would likely cost much more. Working with scientific colleagues, Sheer has estimated that it would cost $10 million–$20 million to install the piping network, bubble diffusers, air compressors, oxygen generators and other equipment. To run it would take another $11 million a year, by their estimates, with much of that spent on electricity to power the air compressors, pumps and other equipment.

While not cheap, that’s far less expensive than the current Bay cleanup tab, Sheer pointed out. In fiscal year 2017 alone, the six Bay watershed states and federal government spent nearly $2 billion on the restoration effort, according to Bay Program figures.

Sheer said the Bay Program model runs showed his aeration proposal would do just as much to raise oxygen levels in the Bay’s depths as the last round of nutrient-reducing cleanup plans drawn up by the watershed states and the District of Columbia.

The model also indicated aeration would actually outperform the Bay pollution diet in another, important way. Artificially increasing oxygen levels would reduce the release of algae-fueling phosphorus and nitrogen back into the water from bottom sediments where they had built up over time. That recycling of nutrients from the sediments has long been viewed by scientists as a potential hindrance to the Bay restoration.

A lot we don’t know

Scientists with whom Sheer has consulted — and Sheer himself — are quick to point out that his proposal relies on some unproven assumptions and could have unintended negative consequences, what engineers and scientists call “revenge effects.”

“There’s a lot we don’t know,” Sheer said. “There’s a lot we think we know that might be wrong.”

Ball, an environmental engineering professor at Johns Hopkins, said that from his experience with aeration in wastewater treatment plants, he’s not sure how well bubblers will work at raising oxygen levels in the Bay’s depths.

“He’s relying a lot on the sloshing of the tides,” Ball said, adding that “there’s a lot more work to do to figure this out.”

Jeremy Testa, an assistant professor at the UMCES lab, called the Bay Program model results “intriguing,” particularly in regard to limiting the flux of nutrients back into the water from sediments. But there are potentially significant downsides, he said.

One is that if the current rate of nutrient pollution isn’t reduced, he said, the phosphorus and nitrogen may simply continue to build up in the sediments, and then pour out into the water in one huge algae-blooming pulse if the bubblers ever shut down, even for a short spell.

That’s what Lora Harris said that she, Testa and other colleagues found at Rock Creek. They also found that the creek was emitting significantly more nitrous oxide — a climate-warming greenhouse gas — than other comparable water bodies.

There’s even a possibility, Harris noted, that pumping oxygen into nutrient-enriched waters could increase the formation of toxic methylmercury, which can build up in fish and is already one of the top two causes for fish consumption advisories in the Bay.

There’s also some concern that a series of aerators would create “bubble curtains” in the water that would impede fish movement.

“You never know what’s going to happen when you start manipulating the environment,” Testa said.

Treating the symptoms

Others say that even if technically feasible, aeration is just treating one of the symptoms of a distressed Chesapeake without fixing the causes of its woes.

While aeration could engineer a remedy for low dissolved oxygen, Testa warned that if nutrient pollution isn’t reduced, “we’re still going to have problems” with algae blooms, sediment-clouded water and important habitat like sea grasses not getting enough light to grow.

“Frankly, from a policy perspective, I think it’s a horrible idea,’’ said Beth McGee, director of science and agriculture policy with the Chesapeake Bay Foundation. It would “let people off the hook,” she contended, weakening public and political pressure to make pollution reductions that would benefit the whole Bay watershed, including its rivers and streams — not just the dead zone.

Indeed, the 2014 Bay Watershed Agreement lays out 10 different goals that go beyond improving water quality to seeking such things as sustainable populations of fish, shellfish and black ducks, increased conservation of land and enhanced public access to the Bay and its tributaries.

‘Horrible idea’ or worth a try?

Sheer acknowledges that aeration is not a substitute for the nutrient and sediment reductions states are having to make under the Baywide Total Maximum Daily Load set in 2010 by the EPA. But rather than sap public interest in saving the Bay, he suggested that it could actually boost it. “If you have a big success,” he said, “maybe you’ll increase momentum to finish the job.”

Lewis Linker, acting associate director of the EPA’s Bay Program office, said that model runs testing Sheer’s proposal are very preliminary and need much more study. But he said “no way, no how” would he see aeration replacing the restoration effort’s current multi-goal approach.

At best, Linker suggested, aeriation might serve as an “add-on,” after all needed pollution reductions have been made, to help maintain healthy oxygen levels in the Bay’s mainstem even under extreme weather conditions.

The only way to find out if aeration can help, Sheer said, is to test the idea someplace in the Bay, with a pilot project costing around $2 million.

“This is not ripe to go out and do,” Sheer said, “but it is ripe, really ripe to go out and do a pilot. … I really think what we need to do next is put a station out there and see what the hell happens.”

Some of the scientists with whom Sheer has consulted agree that for all its potential pitfalls, it’s still worth further study.

“It’s not necessarily the complete solution,” Harris said, to the Bay’s nutrient overenrichment. But, she said, “It’s potentially nudging one of the symptoms that we do care about. …We have an obligation to think about all sides.”

By Tim Wheeler

Tim Wheeler (twheeler@bayjournal.com)is associate editor of  Bay Journal, published by Bay Journal Media, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, to inform the public about issues that affect the Chesapeake Bay. 

This Weekend in Easton – July 5 – 7, 2019

The Talbot Spy shares with its readers each week Discover Easton’s “This Weekend in Easton” events newsletter. Each edition takes a look at the community events going on in Easton for the coming weekend, and highlights Signature Events hosted by Discover Easton. From shows at the Avalon Theatre, fundraisers, art exhibits, in-store promotions, festivals, and more, there is always something to do in Easton, Maryland.

 

 

Fourth of July Sidewalk Sale
Thurs., July 4 | 8 a.m. to noon
Downtown Easton

This cash-and-carry sale will offer HUGE savings on clothing, apparel, home furnishings, and more! Enjoy live music, summer deals, breakfast treats, and other fun activities. Shop Local, Save Big! More Info


Easton 4th of July Carnival & Fireworks
Thurs., July 4 | 4 p.m. to 11 p.m.
Behind Target (28539 Marlboro Ave)

Easton’s Independence Day celebration features carnival rides, fun games, & yummy food! The Janglebachs take the stage at 6 p.m. with music from the Woodstock generation. Fireworks begin at dusk. More Info


First Weekend
July 5 – July 7
Easton, Maryland

Shop | Dine | Arts

Experience Easton on the first weekend of each month. Our local merchants are excited to show you what makes our business community special and showcase our Eastern Shore hospitality! More Info


Easton Ghost Walk
Fri., July 5 | 8 p.m.
Meet in Front of Tidewater Inn

Take a nighttime ghostly walk through the Eastern capital of Maryland. Filled with history and mystery, the Easton ghost walk is a hauntingly entertaining evening that is fun for the entire family. More Info


Farmers Market
Sat., July 6 | 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Public Lot; 100 Block of N. Harrison St

Local produce, nursery stock & bulbs, breads, pastries, handcrafted gifts, Rise Up Coffee, fresh cut flowers, local honey, pet treats, kombucha, rum, and prepared foods. Live music begins at 10:30 a.m. every Saturday. More Info


Bluepoint on the Block Presents Max Fisher & Jimmy Mcguire
Sat., July 6 | 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Bluepoint Hospitality (5 Federal St)

This summer, Bluepoint Hospitality hosts a collection of local & regional talent during Live Music Saturdays on Federal Street. More Info


Free Musical Theatre Showcase
Sat., July 6 | 2:00 p.m.
EHS (723 Mecklenburg Ave)

Over 30 students, from 3rd grade through college who participated in Crashbox’s Summer Theatre Intensives, will showcase their talents in some of musical theatre’s favorite numbers! More Info


Chesapeake Classic Car Club
Saturday Cruise-ins
Sat., July 6 | 5 p.m.
Waterside Village (28632 Marlboro Ave)

The CCCC is hosting Cruise-ins the first Saturday of each month May through October from 5 to 8 pm. All makes and models are welcome. More Info


XPD’s – Outdoor Concert!
Sat., July 6 | 7:00 p.m.
Harrison Street (In Front of Tideater Inn)

The series offers free live music, dancing in the streets, and fun activities that engage kids in learning about caring for the Chesapeake Bay. More Info


Save the Date: Easton Culture Crossing Inaugural Gathering!
Sat., July 13 | noon to 4 p.m.

Easton Arts District Culture Crossing is an artisan’s showcase celebrating the diversity of Easton’s neighborhoods. As an open air style market along the rails to trails in Easton, the Culture Crossing will feature art made or performed by locals of different cultures and ethnicities. More Info

The Spy Newspapers of America with Steve Goldman

When I started the Chestertown Spy in 2009, I wasn’t convinced that having a local newspaper with “spy” in the masthead was the best idea around. During the months prior to launching my concept of a web-based, hyper-local and educational news source, I continued to postpone deciding on its name until the very last minute.

My heart said yes; I loved the fact that the new publication could be named after Chestertown’s first newspaper in 1793, but my mind said this could be a grave mistake. For every one person in town that knew of the original newspaper’s existence, there were nine people who could easily interpret the the word “spy” in less than generous ways.

Nonetheless, John Lang, the Spy’s first executive editor and former AP reporter, lobbied hard to use the old name, and I agreed to look again at the 18th century Spy one more time before we were to turn on the new site.

And in looking at the old version of the Chestertown Spy, I began to see how these two entities, divided by over two hundred years, would be remarkably similar in the content they would provide the community. While public affairs remained a primary focus, you can see in the early Spy a surprisingly wide range of topics that reflected a passion for the arts and culture.

With subjects as diverse as philosophy, health, education, spirituality, poetry, and storytelling, the first Spy surprisingly incorporated many of the same topics the new Spy inspired provide greater Chestertown. It was a perfect fit and I’ve never regretted the decision nor the responsibility in carrying on the original Chestertown Spy’s mission.

But this journey into the historic roots of the Spy also led me on a quest of sorts in understanding why so many colonial newspapers used that name in their masthead. By 1820, there were more than 14 newspapers in America that used that Spy in their name, starting with the venerable Massachusetts Spy which started in 1770.

And when I discovered that the largest private collection of historical newspapers in the United States was located in none other than Oxford Maryland, I drove over to meet its owner, Steve Goldman, who build this remarkable archive of American history to get a crash course on the Spy newspapers of America as well as his thoughts on journalism then and now.

This video is approximately five minutes in length. For more information about Stephen A. Goldman Historical Newspapers please go here.

 

 

 

 

This Weekend in Easton – June 28 – 30, 2019

The Talbot Spy shares with its readers each week Discover Easton’s “This Weekend in Easton” events newsletter. Each edition takes a look at the community events going on in Easton for the coming weekend, and highlights Signature Events hosted by Discover Easton. From shows at the Avalon Theatre, fundraisers, art exhibits, in-store promotions, festivals, and more, there is always something to do in Easton, Maryland.

 

Easton Carnival
June 28 – July 4
Behind Target (28539 Marlboro Ave)

Enjoy a week-long community celebration with carnival rides, fun games, yummy food, and traditional summer carnival activities.The big party and celebration happens on the 4th of July with fireworks and concert! More Info


Jellyfish Glass Workshop
Fri., June 28 | 6 to 8 p.m.
Kiln Born Creations (1 S. Washington St)

Learn the basics of glass fusing to recreate the jellyfish design. Layer, fire, and arrange glass in just the right way to make it look like the jellyfish are dancing! More Info


Vivian Sessoms
Fri., June 28 | 8 p.m.
Stoltz Listening Room (40 E Dover Rd)

A wunderkind that got her start opening at the age of 9 for Marvin Gaye, she’s worked with legendary artists like Michael Jackson, Cher, Stevie Wonder, and many others throughout the course of her multi-faceted career. More Info


Farmers Market
Sat., June 29 | 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Public Lot; 100 Block of N. Harrison St

Local produce, nursery stock & bulbs, breads, pastries, handcrafted gifts, Rise Up Coffee, fresh cut flowers, local honey, pet treats, kombucha, rum, and prepared foods. Live music begins at 10:30 a.m. every Saturday. More Info


Tiny Tunes!
Sat., June 29 | 9 a.m.
Coastal Retreat (717 Goldsborough St)

Silly and fun, this musical exploration invites you and your little one to sing and move together while also engaging with others! During the 40 minute class you’ll get to shake your sillies out. Grab a tambourine and march to the beat! More Info




STEM Saturdays at The Lab

Sat., June 29 | 9 a.m.
Coastal Retreat (717 Goldsborough St)

Every Saturday this summer, kids work in tribes to complete various STE(A)M based challenges. A morning packed with engineering & imagination! $12/class (one time $20 supply fee) More Info


Bluepoint on the Block Presents Jayme D.
Sat., June 29 | 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Bluepoint Hospitality (5 Federal St)

This summer, Bluepoint Hospitality hosts a collection of local & regional talent during Live Music Saturdays on Federal Street. More Info


Gridline
Sat., June 29 | 8:00 p.m.
Stoltz Listening Room (40 E Dover Rd)

The band has opened for artists such as Iggy Azalea, Galactic, Max Creek, Kung Fu, Sister Sparrow & The Dirty Birds, and The Nigel Hall Band, and continues to set their sights higher and higher. More Info


Save the Date: Fourth of July Sidewalk Sale
Thurs., July 4 | 8 a.m. to noon

Join our downtown merchants as they clear out their racks and make room for new inventory! This cash-and-carry sale will offer HUGE savings on clothing, apparel, home furnishings, and more! Enjoy live music, summer deals, breakfast treats, and other fun activities. More Info

This Weekend in Easton – June 21 – 23, 2019

The Talbot Spy shares with its readers each week Discover Easton’s “This Weekend in Easton” events newsletter. Each edition takes a look at the community events going on in Easton for the coming weekend, and highlights Signature Events hosted by Discover Easton. From shows at the Avalon Theatre, fundraisers, art exhibits, in-store promotions, festivals, and more, there is always something to do in Easton, Maryland.

 

Ladies’ Night
Fri., June 21 | 5 to 9 p.m.
Kiln Born Creations (1 S. Washington St)

All ladies 18+ receive 40% off created items (some exclusions). Please bring friends, snacks, & beverages. Book a spot now – it’s free to reserve! More Info


9 & Dine at Hog Neck
Fri., June 21 | 5:30 p.m.
Hog Neck Golf Course (10142 Old Cordova Rd)

9 holes scramble format with two person teams. After golf, dinner is served at Eagle’s Cafe. Enjoy a Shi-Mar Farms Prime Rib dinner with sides. $25 for members, $40 for non-members. More Info


Let’s Roll Summer Skate Nights
Fri., June 21 | 7 p.m.
Talbot Community Center (10028 Ocean Gtwy)

Let’s Roll Summer Skate Nights during special Friday evenings this summer! Live DJ, Snack Bar, & 2-Hours of Open Skating with your family & friends. Rent skates or bring your own. More Info


Michelle Walker – Jazz Vocalist
Fri., June 21 | 8 p.m.
Stoltz Listening Room (40 E Dover Rd)

Michelle Walker is often compared to Cassandra Wilson, Nina Simone, and Betty Carter in style and tone but has developed her own unique sound and singular voice. More Info


Farmers Market
Sat., June 22 | 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Public Lot; 100 Block of N. Harrison St

Fresh produce, nursery stock & bulbs, breads, pastries, handcrafted gifts, fresh cut flowers, local honey, pet treats, kombucha, rum, and prepared foods. Live music begins at 10:30 a.m. every Saturday. More Info


Juneteenth
Sat., June 22 | 11 a.m.
Academy Art Museum (106 South St)

This year celebrates African-American Music Appreciation Month with a variety of musical performances with African-American roots. Enjoy family art projects, face painting, photo booth, food, & more family fun events! More Info


Bluepoint on the Block Presents Ginger Cats
Sat., June 22 | 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Bluepoint Hospitality (5 Federal St)

Bluepoint Hospitality hosts a collection of local & regional talent during Live Music Saturdays on Federal Street. More Info


Roland Comtois – Spiritual Medium
Sat., June 22 | 8:00 p.m.
Stoltz Listening Room (40 E Dover Rd)

Roland takes you on a journey through the door to the afterlife in a stage reading of his near-death experience, including an original musical score and songs. More Info


Save the Date: Easton Carnival & July 4th Celebration
June 28 – July 4 (Music & Fireworks July 4) | More Info

Christopher Tilghman Chats about “Thomas and Beal in the Midi”

Mystery Loves Company Booksellers  of Oxford Welcome will be welcoming back Christopher Tilghman at the Robert Morris Inn Thursday June 20th from 5:00 – 7:00 pm. The public is welcome to chat with him over French wine and canapés about the third in his Maryland Mason’s Retreat saga. Thomas and Beal in the Midi follows Thomas heir to The Retreat set in Queens Anne’s County and his love for Beal a free black servant on the estate.

Due to Maryland’s miscegenation prohibiting black and white marriages, Thomas takes Beal from their home in Maryland to Paris where Thomas hopes they marriage and live freely. They arrive with help from a nun and friends whom they meet along the way. Beal becomes the toast of Paris as an artists model and is accepted into Paris society. Thomas researches how he can make a living and turns once again to his knowledge of farming and purchases a vineyard. Moving to the south of France, with trepidation from Beal, they find that marriage and the family they desire is not always without hardship.

In elegant lush prose, as in Mason’s Retreat and The Right Hand Shore, Tilghman once again illuminates the lives of all of the levels of society as he informs us of our humanity.

 

Date of Event: June 20, 2019
Time of event: 5:00 – 7:00 pm
Place: Robert Morris Inn, Oxford Maryland 21654

Mystery Loves Company Booksellers in Oxford will have Mr. Tilghman’s books for sale at the free event. For more information please contact Kathy Harig, Mystery Loves Company Booksellers 410-226-0010 or info@mysterylovescompany.com

This Weekend in Easton – June 14 – 16, 2019

The Talbot Spy shares with its readers each week Discover Easton’s “This Weekend in Easton” events newsletter. Each edition takes a look at the community events going on in Easton for the coming weekend, and highlights Signature Events hosted by Discover Easton. From shows at the Avalon Theatre, fundraisers, art exhibits, in-store promotions, festivals, and more, there is always something to do in Easton, Maryland.

 

2019 Chamber Music Festival
June 13 – June 15
Various Locations

It is the final weekend of the Chamber Music Festival. Weekend performances include From Rags to Riches, Romancing & Dancing, and The Art of the String Quartet. More Info


Sullivan Surgery & Spa Open House
Fri., June 14 | 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Sullivan Surgery & Spa (1 Goldsborough St)

Join them this Friday for an open house! Come learn about D.O.S.E., meet the staff, and more! Plus all SkinCeuticals sunscreens are 15% off for the month of June! More Info


Faith, Family, Freedom Board Art
Fri., June 14 | 6 to 8 p.m.
Kiln Born Creations (1 S. Washington St)

Prepare for the 4th of July and join Kiln Born to paint this patriotic board art. $10 to reserve space, $25 board art (includes 3 stars/twine) More Info


Flag Day Concert & Ceremony
Fri., June 14 | 6:30 p.m.
Easton Elks Lodge (502 Dutchmans Ln)

Concert of patriot music followed by the Elks amazing Flag Day Ceremony. Concert will be held on the Elk’s lawn or inside due to weather. Bring chairs/blankets. Ice cream social follows. More Info


CLAP HANDS: Bovine Social Club Performs the Poetry and Song of Tom Waits!
Fri., June 14 | 8 p.m.
Stoltz Listening Room (40 E Dover Rd)

The Bovines creatively mine Waits poetry, lyrics, obscurities, & oddities, interpreting & performing them in pure Americana style. More Info


Bike MS: Chesapeake Challenge 2019
Sat., June 15 | 7 a.m.
Talbot Community Center (10028 Ocean Gtwy)

This annual two-day fundraising event takes cyclists through the scenic Eastern Shore. The ride is fully supported, includes fun rest stops, and an end of race celebration! More Info


Farmers Market
Sat., June 15 | 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Public Lot; 100 Block of N. Harrison St

Fresh produce, nursery stock & bulbs, breads, pastries, handcrafted gifts, fresh cut flowers, local honey, pet treats, kombucha, rum, and prepared foods. Live music begins at 10:30 a.m. every Saturday. More Info


Running Marvel 5k
Sat., June 15 | 9 a.m.
EHS (723 Mecklenburg Ave)

The Running Marvel 5k race was created as a memorial celebration of the life of Don Marvel, and to honor his memory by raising funds in support of cancer research at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center. More Info


Bluepoint on the Block Presents Colby Sard
Sat., June 15 | 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Bluepoint Hospitality (5 Federal St)

Bluepoint Hospitality hosts a collection of local & regional talent during Live Music Saturdays on Federal Street. More Info


3rd Annual Paddle-Jam
Sat., June 15 | 3 to 10 p.m.
Easton Point Marina (975 Port St)

A leisurely, 6-mile out-and-back paddle on the beautiful Tred Avon River. The fun continues with a cool after-party. Live music, prizes, food trucks, cold beer, hot steamed crabs, fun lawn games, and so much more. See you there! More Info


Clean Water Concert Series
Sat., June 15 | 7 p.m.
Harrison Street (In Front of Tidewater Inn)

An evening of classy, toe-tapping tunes by the Commodores, the U.S. Navy’s premier jazz ensemble.The annual concert series is a great way to celebrate the beauty and vitality of the Bay area. More Info


Pierce Edens
Sat., June 15 | 8:30 p.m.
Stoltz Listening Room (40 E Dover Rd)

Pierce Edens draws on his Appalachian songwriting roots & blends them with the grunge sounds that took him in his teenage years. The result is a haunting and fiery mixture that is notoriously hard to pin down. More Info

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