School System Recognizes Community Partners

Talbot County Public Schools hosted its third annual Community Partner Recognition Breakfast on May 24 at the Easton Volunteer Fire House. More that 850 businesses, organizations and individuals were invited to the event.  Attendees were treated to a delicious breakfast prepared by the Easton High Culinary Arts students, along with musical entertainment by members of Easton High’s award winning “Warrior Chorale.”

“This is a community that values education,” said Dr. Kelly Griffith in her opening remarks.  “The time, resources and expertise that our community partners provide to our schools truly make a difference for our students and staff.  This includes adopting classrooms, providing internships, donating supplies, funding enrichment opportunities, coordinating after school programs, and so much more.  We are so very grateful for this generous support and cannot thank you enough.”

The program included recognition of a Partner of the Year for each of the nine schools in the district, as well as a District Partner of the Year as follows:

 District Partner of the Year – American Legion Blake-Blackston Post #77

Chapel District Elementary – Andersen Wealth Management
Easton Elementary – Dobson – Family Affair Farm
Easton Elementary – Moton – AQUA Pools & Spas
Saint Michaels Elementary – Christ Church – St. Michaels, MD
Tilghman Elementary -The Candleberry Shoppe
White Marsh Elementary – Higginbottom Orthodontics
Easton Middle School – First Baptist Church of Easton, MD
Easton High School – Dock Street Foundation
Saint Michaels Middle High School – Royal Oak Community United Methodist Church

Saint Michaels High School Students are Inducted Music Honor Society

A ceremony was held at Saint Michaels Middle High School last month to induct new members into the school’s chapter of the Tri-M Music Honor Society.  Tri-M, formerly known as Modern Music Masters, is a high school and middle school music honor society and is a program of the National Association for Music Education

To be considered for induction students must meet criterion in the following areas: Music Participation, Academic Achievement, Leadership, Service, and Character. The Tri M Advisement team is Amy Effler, Chorus Director and Chris Flaherty, Band Director.

New members were recently inducted in the SMMHS Chapter of the Tri M Music Honor Society. L-R: Jack Gill,Jayde Gilliece. Katelynn Cherry, Rebecca Bibeau, Makayla Vasquez.

The SMMHS chapter will raise funds to support local, national and international music programs through bake sales at concerts, local bake sales, and other school fundraisers. SMHS Junior Gretchen Kinnamon is in the process of designing an original logo for them promote the society.

TheSpring 2018 inductees are as follows:

Mackenzie Campbell- President
India Tran- Vice President
Kyla Stinchcomb- Treasurer
Cora Fluharty- Historian
Hannah Bagley- Secretary
Rebecca Bibeau
Katelynn Cherry
Jack Gill
Jayde Gilliece
Makayla Vasquez

Easton High School Students are Inducted into National Honor Society

A ceremony was held at Easton High School last month to induct 8 juniors and 39 sophomores into The J. Willard Davis Chapter of the National Honor Society (NHS). NHS is a national organization established in 1921 which serves to recognize students who have demonstrated excellence in the areas of scholarship, service, leadership, and character.

To be considered for induction into the National Honor Society,students must meet minimum criteria which include a cumulative GPA equal to or greater than 86.5%, cumulative attendance rate equal to or greater than 94%, no more than 2 disciplinary referrals, and completion of at least 100 service learning hours.

Qualifying students are given the opportunity to submit an application and recommendations, which are reviewed by Easton High School faculty. English Teacher Lenore Burkhardt serves as Easton High School’s National Honor Society Faculty Advisor.

The ceremony included the lighting of the Knowledge Candle and the presentation of the Four Qualities of the National Officer by chapter officers Colin Elliott, President; Riley Scott, Vice President; Abigail Wittman, Treasurer; and Elizabeth Hostetter, Secretary.

The Spring 2018 inductees are as follows:

Juniors

Joshua Atwood
Kendall Bishop
Jaden Cassell
Sabrina Davis
Nyaja Jackson
Stephen Kerchner
Ian Mann
Tabius Wilson

Sophomores

Azqa Asad
Tristan Atwell
Madeline Book
Owen Callahan
Evelyn Campbell
William Cook
William Denny
Abigale Detrich
Anna Ewing
Didier Exantus
Noah Greene
Emily Griffith
Henry Hills
Taylor Jackson
Myia Jeter
Christopher Kaminskas
Maryam Khalid
Katherine Kilbourn
Isabella Kuchnio
Danielle Mills
Andrea Morgan
Taylor Nail
Joshua Newmier
Sara Park
James Parkinson
Akshay Patel
Zachary Paugh
Lilly Roser
Danielle Schuman
Maya Skirka
Courtney Stevens
John Stinson
Abigail Szymanski
Eleanor Walter
Julie Warner
Corey Wazniak
Craig Weedon
Anna Wheatley
Keana Williams

Kent School to Offer Summer Programs for Children

Kent School will offer several summer programs for children from age 3 to 12.  For the youngest children, ages 3 to 5, Kent School is offering two week-long sessions of Little Camp. Little Camp is led by Kent School teachers, Julia Gross and Karen Schauber. The first session of Little Camp, Seuss on the Loose will be held June 18 – June 22. Campers will explore everything Seuss through art, literature, science and physical activity.  The second session, Beach Party, will run June 25 – June 29. In Beach Party campers will create, imagine, read about and investigate who and what can be found during a trip to the seashore. The camp day runs from 9:00 a to 4:00 pm. Extended day is available starting at 8:00 am. and is also available until 5:00 pm. The camp fee is $185 per week. Extended day care is $10 per hour. Visit kentschool.org for more information. Call 410-778-4100 ext. 110 to request a brochure or email admissions@kentschool.org.

In addition to Little Camp, Kent School will also host YMCA summer programs for the second consecutive year. The YMCA will offer week-long Preschool camps for children ages 3 and a half to age 5 starting the week of June 18 and concluding the week of August 13. Themes will include Paw Patrol, Storybook Station, Petite Picasso and much more. Specialty camps, for children ages 5 – 12 will include sessions for children who want to cook, build, create and explore with session like Mad Scientist, Glee Camp, Nerf Madness, Sweet Shop and many other terrific choices. The full catalog of YMCA camp offerings will be available soon. Visit the YMCA of the Chesapeake website for more information at ymcachesapeake.org.

Nancy Mugele, Head of School at Kent School said, “We are looking forward to having a busy summer with dozens of children enjoying our beautiful campus. In addition to Little Camp and the YMCA summer programs, Kent School will also be hosting Horizons of Kent and Queen Anne for six weeks.” Mugele continued, “It is a pleasure and an honor to host these wonderful programs that will keep children actively engaged in learning and fun during the summer months.”

For more information about Kent School visit www.kentschool.org. Kent School, located in historic Chestertown, MD is an independent day school serving children from Preschool through Grade 8. The School’s mission is to guide our students in realizing their potential for academic, artistic, athletic, and moral excellence. Our school’s family-oriented, supportive, student-centered environment fosters the growth of honorable, responsible citizens for our country and our diverse world.

Laura Johnson Steps Up Into Role as Vice President of Finance

Washington College President Kurt Landgraf announced today that Laura Johnson, who has served as Washington College’s chief budget officer for the past four years, will be promoted to Vice President of Finance.

Johnson, who before joining Washington College was the senior global financial analyst with the DuPont Company in Wilmington, Delaware, succeeds Rahel Rosner, who has accepted a position with St. Paul’s School in Baltimore.

“I am honored to continue to serve Washington College and excited for the opportunity to partner with Kurt, faculty, and senior leadership to ensure the sustainability of our future,” Johnson says. “We have some of the most talented and dedicated students, faculty, and staff and a board that is generous and insightful.  I look forward to the relationship with the community of Chestertown and to the exciting challenges and opportunities that lie ahead.”

In announcing the transition, Landgraf applauded the work of the Finance and Administration team, which is managing capital projects in various stages of development, from the construction of the Hodson Boathouse and Semans-Griswold Environmental Hall, to the upcoming renovation of the Cullen residential hall, the completion of a full facilities condition assessment, and a master plan update.

Less visible, he said, has been the team’s work on financial sustainability, budget modeling, and projections—areas of primary focus for Johnson. She has been the main liaison between both the Provost’s Office and the Office of Finance and the academic and administrative departments for matters related to resource allocation, financial planning, and approval of actions related to employees, major purchases, and capital projects. She serves on the Finance and Benefits Committee, the Planning Committee, the Donor Relations & Stewardship Committee, and as an adviser for the Washington College Veterans Association, helping lead the annual holiday drive to gather and send supplies and gifts to those deployed in the active military.

“Laura Johnson is an incredibly talented financial officer who has proven to be up to the challenge of maximizing the College’s resources,” says Landgraf. “She’s also totally committed to the welfare of this institution. I am delighted to be able to tap one of most our talented and committed employees for a position of greater responsibility.”

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Construction Starts at The Country School

Willow Construction, one of the largest and most trusted commercial construction firms on Delmarva, has begun work on The Country School, a private school in Easton, Maryland. Work began on Monday, April 23rd, and is expected to take 16 months to complete the project and be ready for the 2019-2020 school year. The project consists of three phases. Phase one includes construction of a new parking lot and drop off/pick up lanes and associated site work. Phase two consists of construction of a new, two story, 20,000 square foot brick building to house the upper school. The last phase of the project will include renovations of the existing Lower School. “Our team is beyond thrilled about this opportunity to not only enhance this prestigious institution but also to update the gateway to Downtown Easton. Additionally, we are proud that The Country School has put their trust in a locally owned and operated company, such as ours, to meet their construction needs” says Mike Hiner, President of Willow Construction. “We love these kinds of projects because we understand what it is going to mean to the people that will be benefiting from the upgraded facilities and supporting the communities we serve.”

Willow Construction has a long history of building educational facilities on the Delmarva Peninsula, including Chesapeake College’s Learning Resource Center, Mace’s Lane Middle School in Cambridge, and The Wye River Upper School in Centreville, Maryland.

English Major Caroline Harvey Wins Washington College 2018 Sophie Kerr Prize

Caroline Harvey, an English major and creative writing minor from Arlington, Virginia, whose writing frequently examines otherness through the perspective of the insect world, has won the 2018 Sophie Kerr Prize. National Public Radio book critic and author Maureen Corrigan announced the winner of the nation’s largest undergraduate prize, this year valued at $63,711, at Washington College this evening.

Harvey, who served as editor-in-chief of The Collegian and managing editor of the Washington College Review, submitted a portfolio that included poetry, nonfiction, and academic scholarship from her thesis, entitled “Poetics of Otherness: The Marginalized Experience Through the Insect Lens.” She attributes her fascination with the insect world to her early reading of Jurassic Park, which propelled her interest in connecting science and writing.

“Caroline’s work is gorgeously detailed and specific. As a poet and academic writer, she takes as her subject matter things that others may find distasteful and difficult and finds the beauty in them. As an editor, she has worked to facilitate of the writing of others and to build a dynamic and supportive literary community on campus,” says Professor Kathryn Moncrief, Chair of the English department and Sophie Kerr Curator.

“I had the distinct pleasure of directing Caroline’s thesis, which incorporated complex literary and identity theory with contemporary poetry in order to posit that Otherness can be owned and deployed in subversive and empowering ways,” says James Hall, Director of the Rose O’Neill Literary House. “Her own poems find new metaphors to think in striking ways about gender, faith, and representation. Caroline uses traditional forms like sonnets and villanelles to subvert patriarchal assumptions about who has the right to speak. Reading Caroline Harvey’s work, I’m reminded of what Wallace Stevens said about how every poet has to reinvent the language for herself.”

At the announcement, Harvey thanked her family, friends, staff of the Rose O’Neill Literary House, and her professors, especially James Allen Hall, from whom she took her first undergraduate class and who advised her senior thesis. She also thanked her former professor, Jeanne Dubrow.

“She was the first person to sit me down and call me ‘poet,’ and that was so important,” Harvey said. “And finally, I have to thank my cohort. Everyone I grew up with in this community, everyone who wrote with me, who read with me, and especially Rhea, and Brooke, and Mallory, and Casey [fellow Sophie Kerr Prize finalists], all of whom came together in this moment. There’s so much about this place that I love, and so much I would like to change. But the one thing that I hold on to at all times is the people—the wonderful people who helped me get where I am.”

A member of Omicron Delta Kappa, the leadership honor society, and Sigma Tau Delta, the English honor society, Harvey plans to take a gap year before pursuing an MFA in poetry and a PhD in English.

Harvey was among five finalists chosen from a number of student portfolios, encompassing essay, poetry, non-fiction, journalism, academic scholarship, and print projects. Although the Sophie Kerr Prize is not limited to English majors, this year’s finalists were all majors in English with one who double majored in political science. Several were creative writing minors, and all represented multiple honors societies and campus leadership activities. Several have worked on College publications including the student newspaper, The Elm, the student review, The Collegian, and Cherry Tree, the College’s national literary journal.

“It is always a privilege to read these portfolios. They illuminate the best of the literary culture and the commitment to writing that is the heart and soul of this College,” Moncrief says. “These students and their outstanding work highlight their diverse interests and approaches, their promise in the field of literary endeavor, their dedication to craft, and their shared passion for the written word.”

Top Grad is Pursuing American Dream through Education

Sofiah Ali’s immigrant journey began in the Philippines and is the reason behind her success.

Ms. Ali, a Stevensville resident, is a biology major and aspiring medical researcher. Tonight, she will be honored with the John T. Harrison Award, the highest student honor at Chesapeake College.

A first-generation college student, Ms. Ali will receive her associate’s degree along with 300 other graduates and will deliver her acceptance speech to them. President and CEO of University of Maryland Shore Regional Health Ken Kozel will deliver the commencement address.

A 2016 graduate of Kent Island High School, Ms. Ali has a cumulative 4.0 Grade Point Average. Since enrolling at Chesapeake, she has been on the Dean’s List every semester.  As an Honors Program student, Ms. Ali completed four Honors Contract projects during her time at Chesapeake.

Ms. Ali, 20, was a semi-finalist for the prestigious national Jack Kent Cooke Transfer Scholarship this year and was a 2017 nominee for the NCHC Portz Award. She is an active member of Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society and participated in recruitment drive that significantly boosted membership.

This record of success if part of a long journey that began more than 15 years ago.

Parents Farzand and Aileen Ali, brought Ms. Ali and her sister Shavanah to Maryland as very young children. This is the only home that Ms. Ali has ever known.

“I don’t remember living in the Philippines, so the United States is what I know. I’ve always had a great sense of pride in my background and where I came from. But when I was younger, because of the influences of my peers, I felt the need to quickly assimilate with those around me,” Ms. Ali said. “I tried to hide something that was an integral part of my identity, I was embarrassed of who I was and the differences I had compared to everyone else. As a result, I began to feel detached from my parents and my culture because of who I was trying to be. Now that I’m older, I realize how silly that was. My differences are what sets me apart from those around me.”

Faculty and staff at Chesapeake say that Ms. Ali’s dedication and drive set her apart.

Ms. Ali works a full schedule at Ledo Pizza on Kent Island while she maintains her perfect GPA at Chesapeake. This semester, she is taking 21 credits. She also volunteers her time with Youthline Eastern Shore Crisis Center.

She was the first-place winner in the Spring 2017 Honors Poster Exhibition and earned a trip to the National Collegiate Honors Council Conference in Atlanta last fall.

On the honors trip, Ms. Ali had the opportunity to visit the Centers for Disease Control. Ms. Ali said she was inspired by both the history and mission of CDC. She hopes to conduct medical research in the future that can be used to improve lives around the globe.

Chesapeake faculty cited, among many attributes, Ms. Ali’s extraordinary work ethic when recommending her for the Harrison Award.

“My mother and father always wanted me to achieve the American Dream. Like millions of other immigrant parents, they left their home country to establish a new life—a better life—for my sister and me. They had sacrificed everything they’d ever known—their language, family, friends, and jobs—in hopes that the new life they sought out for us would open doors to opportunities they never had. From the moment I entered Pre-K until now, I made sure I worked hard in all of my endeavors so that everything they had to give up on would one day be worth it,” Ms. Ali said. “I felt the need to prove myself and work twice as hard. I was not going to hold myself back from living a life without purpose. The tears I once shed out of hopelessness have been replaced with hope and motivation for my life-long ambitions.”

In nominating his student for the Harrison Award, Phi Theta Kappa faculty advisor Jeremy Crowe described Ms. Ali as one of Chesapeake’s great assets.

“Sofiah is an excellent student, an excellent human being and she will bring prestige to this college as an alumna. She is the daughter of immigrants who instilled in Sofiah the importance of hard work, perseverance and kindness. Her Pakistani and Filipino heritage brings diversity to our campus, and you won’t meet a friendlier student Skipjack,” said Associate Professor Jeremy Crowe.

Ms. Ali said that she hopes her Commencement will be as rewarding for her parents as it is for her.

 “I’m eternally grateful for their decision and everything that they had to sacrifice. Although at times, the obstacles we would be presented with are enough to lose hope, I will never forget the things they had to give up on just for the sake of my sister and me. All of their blood, sweat, and tears will one day be exchanged for a better life when my sister and I will be able to one day take care of them the way they did for us,” she said.

Ms. Ali will pursue a bachelor’s degree this fall at either the University of Maryland or Tufts University. She plans to major in molecular biology with the goal of earning a doctorate and becoming a medical researcher.

EMS 8th Graders Perform with Jeff Antoniuk and the Jazz Update

Members of the Easton Middle School band had the rare honor of performing with professional Jazz Saxophonist Jeff Antoniuk and his band, the Jazz Update, live on stage at the Avalon.  The Talbot County and Maryland Arts Councils, the Avalon Foundation and the Dock Street Foundation joined together to generously provide artist-in-residence workshops with Antoniuk and his band for the Easton Middle 8th grade band students.

Antoniuk is internationally respected as a jazz composer and musician. Now living in Annapolis, Maryland, the Canadian born artist appears on numerous recordings and has been consistently well received by critics.  He worked with students at the school in several sessions during band class.  At the end of the final week of the program, the 8th grade musicians performed for their classmates in the morning, then performed a free public concert the same evening. Antoniuk and his band also performed several selections independently, and the concert included a brief history of the origin and development of jazz in the U.S.

“This is a phenomenal opportunity for our students,” said Donna Ewing, Easton Middle School Band Director.  “To perform in this wonderful theatre with professional musicians of this caliber is truly an inspiration. We are so grateful to the Avalon Foundation, Dock Street Foundation and the Arts Councils for making this possible.”

Five WC Seniors Named Finalists for the 2018 Sophie Kerr Prize

Five Washington College seniors today were named finalists for the 2018 Sophie Kerr Prize, the nation’s largest undergraduate literary award, this year worth $63,711. All will read from their work at an event this Friday, where author, journalist, and literary critic Maureen Corrigan will announce the winner.

The finalists’ reading and the announcement of the winner begins at 7:30 p.m. in Hotchkiss Recital Hall in the Gibson Center for the Arts and is free and open to the public. It will also be live streamed at https://www.washcoll.edu/offices/digital-media-services/live/.

Although the Sophie Kerr Prize is not limited to English majors, this year’s finalists are all majors in English with one who is a double major in political science. Several also are creative writing minors, and all represent multiple honors societies and campus leadership activities, including Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma Tau Delta, and the Cater Society of Junior Fellows. Several have worked on College publications including the student newspaper, The Elm, the student review, The Collegian, and Cherry Tree, the College’s national literary journal.

“It is always a privilege to read these portfolios. They illuminate the best of the literary culture and the commitment to writing that is the heart and soul of this College,” says Professor Kathryn Moncrief, Chair of the English department and Sophie Kerr Curator. “These students and their outstanding work highlight their diverse interests and approaches, their promise in the field of literary endeavor, their dedication to craft, and their shared passion for the written word.”

The work submitted for the prize ranges across genre and topic, encompassing essay, poetry, nonfiction, journalism, academic scholarship, and print projects.“The finalists address politics,entomology, history,family, and social issues including feminism and racism. And they do so with the writer’s devotion to delight, provocation, and craft,” says James Hall, Director of the Rose O’Neill Literary House.

(L to R) Casey Williams, Brooke Schultz, Mallory Smith, Caroline Harvey, and Rhea Arora, are the finalists for the 2018 Sophie Kerr Prize.

The finalists:

Rhea Arora, an English and political science double major from Kolkata, India, is a member of Zeta Tau Alpha, the peer mentor program, an intern at the Admissions department, and a tutor at The Writing Center. She is also a member of Pi Sigma Alpha, the political science honor society, Sigma Tau Delta, the English honor society, and Omicron Delta Kappa, the leadership honor society. Arora’s writing portfolio includes a collection of fictional essays based on her experience as a person of color in the U.S., excerpts from her senior thesis, and journalistic pieces. After graduation, Arora intends to enter the political journalism industry as a writer and reporter.

Caroline Harvey, an English major and creative writing minor from Arlington, Virginia, served as editor-in-chief of The Collegian, managing editor of the Washington College Review, and is a member of Omicron Delta Kappa, the leadership honor society, and Sigma Tau Delta, the English honor society. Harvey’s writing portfolio includes poetry, nonfiction, and academic writing focused on insects and a psychotic episode. After graduation, she is taking a gap year before pursuing an MFA in poetry and a PhD in English.

Brooke Schultz, an English major from Moorestown, New Jersey, served as editor-in-chief of The Elm, prose editor of The Collegian, president of Sigma Tau Delta, the English honor society, and was a member of Phi Beta Kappa, the nation’s first academic honor society. Her portfolio includes a collection of short stories, an excerpt from her Senior Capstone Experience about Sophie Kerr, and clips from her journalism that appeared in The Elm. Upon graduation, she plans to pursue journalism and literary editing and publishing.

Mallory Smith, an English major and creative writing minor from Ellicott City, Maryland, was a Sophie Kerr Scholar and served as president of the Writers’ Union, poetry editor of The Collegian, and was a member of both Sigma Tau Delta and the Cater Society of Junior Fellows. Her portfolio includes a collection of creative nonfiction and poetry. After graduation, Smith will be a pursuing an MFA in poetry at the University of Florida.

Casey Williams, an English major and creative writing minor from Wilmington, Delaware, has served as president of the Writers’ Union, designs book covers for a local author, is a member of Sigma Tau Delta, and bee-keeps at the Campus Garden. She has served as project manager for The Pegasus and worked as a Literary House summer intern. She has also screened for Washington College’s literary journal, Cherry Tree, and The Summerset Review. Williams’ portfolio focuses on the intertwining of humanity and nature and includes book cover design, a collection of free verse and mixed-media poetry, and her thesis. After graduation, Williams will be attending Emerson College to earn an MA in writing and publishing.

Maureen Corrigan, who will announce the winner on Friday, is a book critic for NPR’s Fresh Air and The Nicky and Jamie Grant Distinguished Professor of the Practice in Literary Criticism at Georgetown University. She is an associate editor of and contributor to Mystery and Suspense Writers (Scribner) and the winner of the 1999 Edgar Award for Criticism, presented by the Mystery Writers of America. Corrigan served as a juror for the 2012 Pulitzer Prize in Fiction. Her book So We Read On: How The Great Gatsby Came To Be and Why It Endures was published by Little, Brown in September 2014. Corrigan’s literary memoir, Leave Me Alone, I’m Reading! was published in 2005. Corrigan is also a reviewer and columnist for The Washington Post’s Book World. In addition to serving on the advisory panel of The American Heritage Dictionary, she has chaired the Mystery and Suspense judges’ panel of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and is currently a curator at the American Writers Museum in Chicago.

About the Sophie Kerr Prize and Legacy

Eastern Shore native Sophie Kerr published 23 novels, hundreds of short stories, and even a cookbook. When she died at 85 years old, she bequeathed the College a half-million-dollar trust fund, requiring that half of the earnings annually go to a graduating senior who shows the most promise for future literary endeavor. The other half funds student scholarships, visiting writers and scholars, and library books. Through this remarkable gift, Washington College has been able to host some of the nation’s most gifted writers, as well as provide its students with extraordinary opportunities to explore their creative potential in writing and literature. Learn more at http://www.washcoll.edu/departments/english/sophie-kerr-legacy/.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at http://www.washcoll.edu/.