WC Announces New Partnership with Johns Hopkins University’s MSN

Washington College students who want to pursue a degree in nursing have a new option thanks to a strategic partnership with Johns Hopkins University’s Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) Entry into Nursing Program. With an emphasis on emerging areas of need and health care leadership, the program offers students an accelerated path to a wide array of patient-care careers.

“This Johns Hopkins program is designed for students who have majored in a non-nursing discipline as an undergraduate and decide to pursue nursing after they complete their undergraduate degree,” says Patrice DiQuinzio, Dean and Provost of the College. “Given that this program focuses on leadership and is inclusive of the humanities and public health, it’s a wonderful fit for Washington College and our students.”

The five-semester Entry Into Nursing Program“prepares students to be top patient-care nurses who have unlimited choices after graduation by emphasizing leadership, global impact, quality and safety, evidence-based practice, and inter-professional education,” says Cathy Wilson, Johns Hopkins School of Nursing Director of Admissions. Students “will learn from a framework that integrates the humanities, public health, and physical and organizational sciences into nursing practice.” Students graduate with a master of science in nursing and are prepared to take the nursing licensing exam to become an RN, or to continue studies toward an advanced degree.

The new partnership complements Washington College’s current nursing program, which offers a dual-degree option with the University of Maryland School of Nursing, through which students spend three years at WC, then two years at UMD, earning a bachelor’s degree from WC and a BS in nursing from UMD in five years. Students may also complete a traditional four-year bachelor’s degree in a major of their choice while completing their pre-nursing prerequisite courses.

For the Johns Hopkins MSN Entry Into Nursing program, WC students don’t need to major in biology or psychology as they do in the dual-degree bachelor’s program with UMD, but they must have a cumulative GPA of 3.2 and have completed several specific courses with a B or better to be considered for admission. Johns Hopkins will provide the College with an advisor to meet with interested WC students to help them during the admissions process, and scholarships and financial aid are available.

“Not everybody knows they want to get into nursing until later in their undergraduate career,” says Jodi Olson, Director of Pre-Health Professions Programs, who helped shepherd the new partnership. “This program gives those students an excellent post-graduate option.”

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 39 states and territories and 25 nations.With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

WC Earns $1 Million State Grant to Expand its GIS Program

Washington College has won a $1 million grant from the Department of Commerce’s Maryland E-Nnovation Initiative Fund (MEIF) to establish an endowed directorship for the College’s GIS Program, broadening student avenues for study and professional experience in the growing geographic information systems field, as well as expanding economic development opportunities and encouraging investment in business development and pilot projects.

Matched by a $1 million grant from The Hodson Trust, this grant marks the third time in three years the College has earned funding through MEIF, a program designed to spur basic and applied research in scientific and technical fields. Washington College is the only undergraduate private liberal arts college to receive an award three years in a row, joining Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland at College Park and at Baltimore.

“I’m thrilled and proud that for the third year running, Washington College has earned the support of the Maryland Department of Commerce for this terrific grant. Our outstanding GIS program is among our strongest for offering students real-world experience within the liberal arts framework, and this will only enhance that to create more opportunities,” said College President Kurt Landgraf. “I especially want to thank The Hodson Trust for providing the necessary match to make this possible. Once again, the Trust’s support and confidence have made a critical difference in the education that we provide to students.”

Since 2003, the College’s GIS Lab, overseen by the Center for Environment & Society (CES), has been training student interns in GIS technologies and analyses while executing funded projects across the country, preparing a new generation of GIS specialists who manage projects and work with clients in a professional setting.

The new grant will enable the College to grow the GIS program and extend it more widely throughout the liberal arts curriculum, as well as broaden collaborations with faculty research and teaching, says CES Director John Seidel, who helped inaugurate the GIS program. It will also allow the College to consider an academic program in geospatial technologies in conjunction with the GIS Lab.

“This will expand our ability to engage in interdisciplinary research in our fields of study, as well as provide community level and business support in incorporating geospatial analysis and technology to solve problems,” Seidel says.

The endowed position will enable the program to move beyond its dependence on funded projects, giving it greater flexibility to work with non-profits and encouraging investment in business development opportunities and pilot projects. “We are very excited about the strong economic development potential that the expansion of our GIS program will bring to Maryland,” Seidel says, “as well as the hands-on, collaborative experiences that it will provide for Washington College students and faculty.”

The other grant winners were Maryland Institute College of Art, Towson University, and UMD College Park. In 2017, the state awarded Washington College $944,000, matched by $1 million from private donors, to create an endowed chair for the College’s new Eastern Shore Food Lab. And, in 2016, the state granted $1 million to match private funds to create an endowed position in the Center for Environment & Society (CES) aimed at creating entrepreneurial opportunities for students in the sciences.

Learn more about GIS at WC here: https://www.washcoll.edu/centers/ces/gis/

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 39 states and territories and 25 nations.With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Chef John Nocita at the Eastern Shore Food Lab Nov. 20

John Nocita, master chef and president of the Italian Culinary Institute, will visit Chestertown on Nov. 20 to lead two presentations at the new Eastern Shore Food Lab about how to make the most of every bit of your food by not wasting any of it.

Nocita, who is among Europe’s leading consultants for menu development and is a certification specialist for the European Community’s Product Authenticity Program, will demonstrate advanced and conventional cooking techniques to transform refuse into luxury. While necessity ignited the creativity in peasant communities, and what they created from all parts of their meals became the basis for most traditional cuisine, fully 40% of food in the United States goes to waste. Nocita’s presentation, “The Day After: How to Make the Most of Your Food Waste,” will teach a zero-waste approach as you plan the big meal.

These are free events but registration is required. One event has already sold out, but some space remains on Nov. 20 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Reserve your spot here:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-day-after-how-to-make-the-most-of-your-food-waste-tickets-51975915362

Nocita is an award-winning chef, a member of the Italian Olive Oil Masters, and a sommelier. He founded the Italian Institute for Advanced Culinary and Pastry Arts to constantly update cooking techniques and menu development for chefs and pâtissier in the world’s increasingly competitive environment.In 2001, he was awarded for Outstanding Contributions to Promote Fine Dining from the Distinguished Restaurants of North America, whom Wine Spectator describes as “the authority on fine dining.”

The Eastern Shore Food Lab is a one-of-a-kind teaching, learning, and production space, led by Bill Schindler, associate professor of anthropology and a world expert on primitive technologies and ancient foodways. Drawing international chefs and food innovators to rethink our food systems by using ancestral food knowledge and technologies, the ESFL aims to create food for today’s palate that is more nutritious, meaningful, and sustainable. Schindler calls this “learning to eat like humans again.”

While working for global food system change, the ESFL will be grounded in the local, propelled by the notion that environmental and cultural sustainability should be at the forefront in our approach to food. By researching the resources unique to the region based on weather, climate, soil chemistry, and microbial biology, and fusing ancient and historic foodways with modern technologies and methods, faculty, students, community members, and collaborative researchers will re-envision our food system, from how we define food to how we grow it and prepare it.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

WC Increases First-in-the-Nation Automatic Scholarship for National Honor Society Students

College just became more affordable for National Honor Society (NHS) graduates enrolling at Washington College. The only institution of higher education in the country to offer an automatic scholarship to NHS students, WC has announced an increase in its scholarship award from $15,000, to $18,000 annually.

The increase reflects the College’s ongoing commitment to make higher education accessible to all students, especially those who demonstrate promise as tomorrow’s leaders. To qualify, students must be NHS members at the time of admission to the College. The scholarship is awarded for up to four years, contingent on the student maintaining a 3.0 GPA.

“We are so proud to offer this opportunity to National Honor Society students,” said Lorna J. Hunter, WC’s Vice President for Enrollment Management. “These scholars are poised to build a strong campus community and use their experience here as a platform for lasting service and leadership. They are extremely deserving of our support, and we are honored to welcome them to our campus.”

“We are delighted that Washington College recognizes the value NHS students bring to their campus,” said Nara Lee, Director of the National Honor Society, a program of the National Association of Secondary School Principals. “The students’ proven commitment to scholarship, leadership, service, and character places them on a path to lifelong contribution in every community they enter. NHS welcomes Washington College as a partner who invests in the potential of these extraordinary students and is committed to cultivating a strong pipeline of tomorrow’s citizen-leaders.”

Washington College has been offering an automatic scholarship to NHS students for more than 20 years. According to the NHS, it is the only institution of higher education in the U.S. to do so.

The scholarship increase will take effect for students enrolled for the Fall 2019 semester, with an application deadline of November 15 for Early Decision, December 1 for Early Action, and February 15 for Regular Decision. Visit washcoll.edu/academic-tuition-scholarships for more information about Washington College Academic Tuition Scholarships.

About National Honor Society

A program of the National Association of Secondary School Principals, the National Honor Society (NHS) is the nation’s premier organization established to recognize outstanding high school students. More than just an honor roll, NHS serves to recognize those students who have demonstrated excellence in the areas of scholarship, service, leadership, and character. These characteristics have been associated with membership in the organization since its beginning in 1921. Today, it is estimated that more than one million students participate in NHS activities. NHS chapters are found in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, many U.S. territories, and Canada.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu

Jo Smail and Paul Jeanes Exhibit at Kohl Gallery Nov. 2

Paul Jeanes

Kohl Gallery at Washington College is pleased to announce “Clippings, Voids and Banana Curry,” a two-person exhibit featuring Baltimore-based artists Jo Smail and Paul Jeanes. To celebrate the opening of this exhibit, Kohl Gallery will present a salon-style conversation between the two artists on Friday, November 2, at 4:00 p.m., followed by an opening reception from 5:00 to 6:30 p.m. Both events are free and open to the public. The exhibit will be on view through December 9, 2018.

Jo Smail, who was born and raised in South Africa, is an internationally renowned artist and lifelong educator who has taught at the University of the Witwatersrand, the Johannesburg College of Art, and most recently at the Maryland Institute College of Art until her retirement in 2017. Smail’s recent works in paint and collage incorporate scraps torn from her personal archive of newspaper articles, family recipes, and photographs that confront personal and political histories through the reconfiguration of memory. Her work has been reviewed in The New York Times, Art in America, Art on Paper, The Baltimore Sun and The Hudson Review, among many others, and is represented by Goya Contemporary gallery in Baltimore.

Paul Jeanes, originally from North Carolina, is the interim Director of the Master of Fine Arts in Studio Art graduate program at the Maryland Institute College of Art, where he has taught for 12 years. He earned a MFA in 2006 from the Hoffberger School of Painting at MICA while studying with noted abstract expressionist, Grace Hartigan. His current body of work consists of paintings, photographs and models that focus on notations of absence and on the enigmatic play of space, color and light. Jeanes’s work has been extensively exhibited along the east coast and in the Baltimore and Washington, D.C. region.

With divergent cultural upbringings and more than three decades between these two artists in age, Smail and Jeanes formed a special friendship while teaching together at MICA and maintain an ongoing dialogue built around their personal musings, their mutual love for tennis, and their sincere admiration for one another’s art practice. Though their works alternately explore political, spatial, interpersonal, and perceptual experiences, an abiding curiosity and idiosyncratic sensibility fuel each artist’s creative output. This exhibit will pair the two artists’s works together for the first time, offering a compelling view into two distinctive creative practices, through the lens of artistic symbiosis and friendship.

Kohl Gallery is located on the first floor of the Gibson Center for the Arts at Washington College in Chestertown, Maryland. The gallery is open Wednesday through Friday 1:30 to 5:30 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday noon to 4 p.m. For more information, please email: kohl_gallery@washcoll.edu.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Kevin Hayes Discusses “George Washington: A Life in Books” Oct. 23

Few Americans think of the nation’s founding father as a writer, or an avid reader. More often than not, we picture George Washington as a vigorous leader astride a horse, commanding an army, or crossing stormy rivers in the cold of night. Kevin Hayes’s prize-winning narrative, George Washington: A Life in Books, dismisses these popular images of Washington as a man of all action and no ideas or learning. By examining Washington’s personal library, his reading notes, and his personal journals, Hayes shows how books influenced the development of Washington’s intellect, his character and leadership skills, and by extension, the development of a new nation.

Hayes, who won the 2018 George Washington Prize, will speak about his book at Washington College on Tuesday, October 23 at 5:15 p.m. in Hynson Lounge, Hodson Hall. A book signing will begin at 4:30 p.m. A reception will be held after the talk. Hosted by the Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience, all events are free and open to the public.

The full schedule for the Washington Prize celebration follows:

• 4:30 – 5:00 p.m. Book signing with Kevin Hayes
• 5:15 – 6:15 p.m. “Making History: A Conversation with Kevin Hayes and Adam Goodheart”
• 6:15 p.m. Public reception.

In awarding Hayes the prize, a jury of noted historians praised him for revealing a new side of Washington, by “uncovering an intellectual curiosity that dozens of previous biographers have missed.” Adam Goodheart, the Starr Center’s Hodson Trust Griswold director says: “A Life in Books demonstrates that while Washington never attended college and felt self-conscious about his lack of formal education compared to some of his peers, he was a broadly inquisitive man who found pleasure as well as instruction in books.”

Hayes’s project began with a fellowship that he received in 2008 from Washington College’s Starr Center. The award allowed him to spend a month working with rare volumes at the Boston Athenaeum, which holds a large portion of George Washington’s personal library.

The recipient of numerous research fellowships, Hayes is emeritus professor of English at University of Central Oklahoma. His interests in literature and American history intersect in his publications The Road to Monticello: The Life and Mind of Thomas Jefferson (2008) and A Journey through American Literature (2012).As a graduate student at the University of Delaware he studied under Professor J. A. Leo Lemay, a leading scholar of early American literature. Hayes lives and writes in Toledo, Ohio.

The George Washington Prize campus celebration is co-sponsored by Washington College Department of History, American Studies Program, Department of English, Sophie Kerr Committee, and Phi Alpha Theta, the College chapter of the national history honors society.

The $50,000 Washington Prize was awarded to Hayes at a black-tie dinner at George Washington’s Mount Vernon Estate in May. Sponsored by Washington College, the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, and Mount Vernon, the Washington Prize is one of the largest literary prizes in the nation. Awarded annually for the year’s best written work about America’s founding era, it particularly recognizes works that contribute to a broad public understanding of the American past.

Established in 2005, the George Washington Prize has honored a dozen leading writers on the Revolutionary era including the Tony Award winner Lin-Manuel Miranda and Pulitzer Prize winning historians Annette Gordon-Reed and Alan Taylor.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Washington College Alumna Caryn York to Speak on Oct. 8

Fifty-three years ago, millions of Americans descended on the National Mall for the “March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom” to hear Martin Luther King Jr.’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech, in which he called for racial and economic justice denied to millions of black Americans. Today, 50 years after King’s assassination, the same fight continues for millions of Americans, even in the blue-ish state of Maryland.

In an Oct. 8 visit as part of the Goldstein Program’s Young Alumni Series, Caryn York, executive director of the Job Opportunities Task Force, will discuss the implications of prior and existing public policy decisions that threaten the possibility of King’s dream ever fully becoming a reality.

The event in Hynson Lounge, Hodson Hall, begins at 5:30 and is free and open to the public.

York is the first African American woman to lead the Job Opportunities Task Force, an independent, statewide nonprofit organization that promotes policies and programs to help low-wage workers advance to high-wage jobs. In her role, York encourages key policymakers and stakeholders to adopt and support policies and programs that eliminate educational and employment barriers and facilitate the successful entry, or re-entry, of low-wage workers.

She has been instrumental in leading numerous state and local policy reform efforts including, but not limited to, “Ban the Box” on job and college applications, expansion of criminal record expungement and shielding laws, postsecondary access and affordability, and reducing the impact of incarceration on working families through development, passage, and implementation of the Maryland Justice Reinvestment Act and statewide bail reform.

York majored in international studies at Washington College and has worked within state and local politics for over 10 years.

The Goldstein Program’s Young Alumni Series was established in 2011 to highlight the accomplishments of talented alumni working in public affairs, and to foster connections between alumni and current students. Once a semester, the program sponsors a tea and talk for students and alumni and a public lecture featuring a recent alumnus.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Andrew Lawler to Discuss His Book “The Secret Token” Oct. 4

The ultimate fate of the more than 100 men, women, and children who landed on Roanoke Island in 1587, with the intent to establish a European settlement in the New World, has been one of the greatest mysteries in American history. Within a few years, the settlers vanished, leaving behind a single clue: a secret token etched into a tree.

In his new book, The Secret Token: Myth, Obsession, and the Search for the Lost Colony of Roanoke, author Andrew Lawler sets out to probe our national need to know. His narrative of America’s oldest unsolved mystery and the people racing to unearth its answer exposes sobering truths about race, gender, and immigration, and ultimately, why historical myths matter.

Lawler will present a book talk and signing on Thursday, Oct. 4 at 5:30 p.m. in Litrenta Lecture Hall, Toll Science Center, at Washington College. Sponsored by the Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience, the program is free and open to the public.

Colorful characters, past and present, populate Lawler’s account, from English knight Sir Walter Raleigh and the Croatoan Indian, Manteo, to archeologist Ivor Noel Hume and Fred Willard, a “maverick Lost Colony seeker.” Digging deep into the archival and archeological evidence, Lawler has written what Publisher’s Weekly hails as “part detective novel, part historical reckoning. . . leading to a thoughtful and timely discourse about race and identity.”

Lawler, the Starr Center’s 2016 – 2017 Hodson Trust-John Carter Brown fellow, is the author of the highly acclaimed Why Did the Chicken Cross the World?. He is a contributing writer for Science, a contributing editor for Archaeology Magazine, and has written for The New York Times, The Washington Post, National Geographic, Smithsonian, and Slate.His book The Secret Token was written in part while in residence in Washington College’s 18th-century Patrick Henry House on Queen Street in Chestertown.

The Hodson Trust-John Carter Brown Library Fellowship

The Starr Center administers the fellowship in partnership with the John Carter Brown Library at Brown University, one of the nation’s oldest and most prestigious institutions for the study of early America. Founded with a $1 million endowment from The Hodson Trust, the fellowship supports work on significant projects related to the literature, history, culture, or art of the Americas before 1830. Now in its fifth year, it welcomes submissions not only from traditional historians, but also from filmmakers, novelists, and creative and performing artists. washcoll.edu/centers/starr/fellowships

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Washington College Poets Win Two Major National Poetry Awards

A second-year English faculty member and an alumna who is now assistant director at the Rose O’Neill Literary House each have earned two top national literary awards in poetry. Kimberly Quiogue Andrews, assistant professor of English and creative writing, has won the 2018 Akron Poetry Prize for her first full-length collection,A Brief History of Fruit, while Lindsay Lusby ’08 has won the 2018 Agha Shahid Ali Prize, awarded by the University of Utah Press, for her first full-length collection, Catechesis: a postpastoral.

“It is a testament to the talented writing community fostered here at Washington College that we can celebrate not one but two incredible poetic achievements,” says James Allen Hall, director of the Rose O’Neill Literary House, associate professor of English, and award-winning poet and essayist. “Each of these prizes—the Akron Prize and the Agha Shahid Ali Prize—are nationally competitive prizes with presses that make beautiful and award-winning books. One of Akron’s books was a finalist for the National Book Award in poetry last year, for instance. I feel honored to work with both of these poets and thrilled that poetry is thriving at Washington College.”

In its announcement of the 2018 Akron Prize, the University of Akron Press describes A Brief History of Fruitas shuttling “between the United States and the Philippines in the search for a sense of geographical and racial belonging. Driven by a restless need to interrogate the familial, environmental, and political forces that shape the self, these poems are both sensual and cerebral … Colonization, class dynamics, an abiding loneliness, and a place’s titular fruit—tiny Filipino limes, the frozen berries of rural America—all serve as focal markers in a book that insists that we hold life’s whole fragrant pollination in our hands and look directly at it, bruises and all.”

Kimberly Quiogue Andrews and Lindsay Lusby

This year’s judge, Diane Suess, selected Quiogue Andrews’s collection from 687 entries, calling it a “superb collection” that “offers up history—personal, familial, post-colonial, geo-political, ecological—and indeed the history of fruit, fruit as sustenance, pleasure, exploitable product, as image, parent, love, and wound… The formal variety is remarkable without calling too much attention to itself . . . the experiments arise organically from each poem’s purpose and particular emotional hue.”

Quiogue Andrews’s BETWEEN won the 2017 New Women’s Voices Prize from Finishing Line Press, and she is a two-time Academy of American Poets prize winner and a Pushcart nominee. Her poems have appeared in Poetry Northwest, Grist, West Branch, Nat. Brut, The Shallow Ends, and Tinderbox Poetry Journal, among others. Her essays and criticism have appeared in the Los Angeles Review of Books, ASAP/J, and elsewhere.

Kimiko Hahn selected Lusby’s Catechesis: a postpastoral, and the University of Utah will publish the book in June 2019. Lusby is invited to read as part of the University of Utah’s Guest Writers Series from the Department of English.

In Catechesis: a postpastoral , Lusby poses the question: If Clarice Starling and Ellen Ripley could warn the girls and women to follow, what would they tell us? The work combines Grimm fairy tale with understated horror movie and the Book of Revelation to construct a vision of the lush green dangers and apocalyptic transformations inherent in girlhood. This lyric lore, which includes strange diagrams and collages of the botanical and the anatomical, contains hidden instruction to prepare girls for the hazards ahead. The manuscript was a finalist for the 2018 Dorset Prize at Tupelo Press and a semi-finalist for the 2018 Brittingham & Felix Pollak Prizes at the University of Wisconsin Press.

Catechsis by Lindsay Lusby is a daring and true debut collection,” said Kimiko Hahn in judging the award.

Lusby, assistant editor for the Literary House Press and managing editor for Cherry Treeis also the author of two chapbooks, Blackbird Whitetail Redhand (Porkbelly Press, 2018) and Imago (dancing girl press, 2014), and the winner of the 2015 Fairy Tale Review Poetry Contest. Her poems have appeared most recently in Passages NorthThe Account, North Dakota QuarterlyTinderbox Poetry JournalFairy Tale Review, and elsewhere. Her visual poems have appeared in Dream Pop Press and Duende.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Mid-Shore History: William Smith’s Washington College with Colin Dickson

It is a common mistake to assume that George Washington was the founder of Washington College in 1782. That was not the case, but the future first president of the United States did agree to allow the use his name for an entirely new liberal arts college in Chestertown as well as hard cash as a donation, which was hard to come by after the Revolution.

No, that honor goes to William Smith, a brilliant academic who had helped start the College of Philadelphia (now University of Pennsylvania) with Ben Franklin and became its first leader. Forced to leave Philly due to his loyalist politics, he came to Chestertown at the request of the town, to start a revolutionary new form of undergraduate education.

In the fall of each year, as Washington College starts its new semester, we like to share an interview with former WC professor Colin Dickson in 2012 about William Smith and how extraordinarily lucky Chestertown was to have such a visionary and innovator in American education start their new school.

This video is approximately ten minutes in length. For more information about Washington College please go here