The Spy’s Monthly Sprout: Talli Oxnam

Over the last several months, the Spy has been doing short interviews with residents that have been using the Trappe-based Eat Sprout prepared meal company. In a joint effort with Eat Sprout owners Ryan and Emily Groll, we wanted to hear first hand why both individuals and families decided to order using this new food option.

We continue this month with Talli Oxnam who is a Vice President with Wye Financial & Trust, a division of United Shore Bank.

Being a working mom, Talli faced a familiar challenge for many professional women who have to provide a healthy meal for families after a long day at the office. So when Ryan gave an overview of his business plan with her at Rise Up about almost two years ago, she signed up on the spot.

The Spy spoke to Talli, and Rich last month to talk about Sprout and the impact it has had on their physical fitness and general quality of life.

This video is approximately two minutes in length. Full disclosure, Sprout donates food to the Spy from time to time. For more information about Sprout please go here

Food Friday: Holiday Leftovers

I just had a tentative peek inside the refrigerator, which is packed and groaning with leftovers and good intentions.

I honestly meant to bake the annual Fourth of July cake yesterday, but Mr. Friday was using the oven to bake ribs. All afternoon. Half of a rack of leftover ribs is contained by a large Baggie, and it is taking over a shelf in the fridge. Also two pints of blueberries, and a pint of raspberries for my holiday-themed cake. Not to mention the large container of heavy whipping cream. The stuff is packed in there. Tight.

Teetering on a top shelf, next to the container of whipping cream, is a quarter sheet cake pan, still half full of Ghiradelli dark chocolate cake, slathered with the best buttercream icing I have EVER made. No wonder we are Weeble People! There are two pint containers of blueberries (One which I upended and scattered all over the kitchen floor on the Fourth in the heat of battle. The takeaway – Luke the wonder dog has no interest in blueberries.) and one of raspberries. There is a wedge of watermelon, and half a cantaloupe.

Sitting boldly in the middle of the fridge is a huge mixing bowl full of potato salad. And right next to that is a Tupperware container of cole slaw; a gallon o’cole slaw.

Crammed into a drawer are half a dozen ears of corn, and an elastic-bound bunch of asparagus.

Also on the top shelf are rye bread, a can of raspberry La Croix fancy fizzy water, a stainless steel tub of extra buttercream frosting, three bottles of store-bought salad dressing, and one Pyrex cup of homemade vinaigrette. I am not happy with any salad dressings these days, and am searching far and wide for a good recipe. Keep watching this spot.

Scattered into any nooks are bottles of middling white wine, and in the crannies are the cheap white wine, milk, Diet Coke and mayonnaise.

There is a package of salted butter, and another of unsalted butter. Also eggs; brown and white.

The Fourth of July cake goes in the Might Have Been a Good Idea category of good intentions paving that slick route to hell for me: https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-garten/flag-cake-recipe-1941624, thus the raspberries and blueberries. I have read that Ina Garten and Martha Stewart can’t agree who first came up with the now ubiquitous Fourth of July flag cake. I am inclined to believe Ina Garten, but only because she and I grew up in the same town. Martha was late to the Connecticut scene.

Since I could not bake anyone’s Fourth of July cake, we managed to get by with slices of leftover chocolate cake. There are still quite a lot of cake leftover, so stop on by later.

Mr. Friday stepped away from the grill this Fourth of July, and brought his cooking skills inside. It was the heady combination of a new, sure-fire baby back ribs recipe, and the stinking temperatures outside. And it was easier for him to monitor the ribs while they cooked, from the comfort of his sofa, and the World Cup games he had TiVo-ed… https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/220987/baked-bbq-baby-back-ribs/

No Fourth of July could be complete without someone’s mother’s potato salad. This year I chose my mother’s. Of course.

Potato Salad

I don’t always have green onions – Vidalias work just fine. No red potatoes? Go for Russets. A little fresh thyme? Why not? It is dependable, tasty and can be adapted and stretched to feed the masses. Just add more potatoes, and more mayonnaise. Particularly fine for large picnic gatherings. Plus you can make it in the morning, and it is just right by suppertime.

• 2 pounds little new, red potatoes
• 1 cup Hellmann’s mayonnaise thinned with milk
• 1 bunch green onions, chopped
• Sea salt and pepper to taste

Boil the potatoes until tender. While warm (but not still steaming hot – I have melted my fingerprints by slicing too early and my life of crime may start any minute now) slice potatoes and begin to layer them in a large bowl – one layer of potatoes, then a handful of green onions and salt and pepper. Pour on some of the mayonnaise mixture. Repeat. Gently stir until all the potatoes are coated. You may need to add more mayonnaise mixture when you are ready to serve, as the potatoes absorb it.

Also necessary for summer holiday feasts is cole slaw. My mother’s won. Again.

My Mother’s Boring (Yet Reliably Deelish) Cole Slaw

• 1 cup Hellmann’s mayonnaise (Duke’s if you live father south)
• 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar vinegar
• 1 tablespoon celery seed (not celery salt)
• 1/4 tsp kosher salt
• 1 half teaspoon coarse black pepper
• Some people add carrots for color. I don’t think my mother would approve.
• 1/2 largish head of cabbage, green or purple, your choice, you will have to live with the consequences. You will be dissecting the cabbage to make workable pieces for slicing.

In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the mayonnaise, vinegar, celery seed, and salt until smooth.
Mix in the shredded cabbage and fold over with spatula until completely coated. Cover and refrigerate 2 hours, or overnight.
It is always better the next day.

We were in California last month and had the great pleasure of eating at the Bouchon Bistro. I bought the Bouchon Bakery Cookbook which is a beautiful, yet weighty, tome with intimidatingly precise recipes. I thought I would be whipping out professional-looking macarons and pain au chocolat immediately upon our return home. Instead, I grabbed a box of Ghiradelli dark chocolate cake mix, and turned to my friends at Food52 for icing guidance. I don’t know why I entertained the notion that I would find time, or oven space, to bake a Fourth of July cake. The chocolate cake is something we know and love, and was perfect for watching Macy’s jubilant fireworks, before we returned to our Independence Day film fest.

Basic Buttercream Icing
https://food52.com/recipes/70448-buttercream-frosting-adapted-from-wilton

Tonight we will not be tossing our usual Friday night pizza. Instead I am rooting around in the freezer for some hot dogs. We will top them with leftover slaw, and have a side of potato salad, and yet another slice of chocolate cake. Oh, and some of that cheap white wine. We need to clear out some space. Happy July!

“The most remarkable thing about my mother is that for thirty years she served the family nothing but leftovers. The original meal has never been found.”
― Calvin Trillin

Spy Report: June’s Tantalizing Talbot Wine Tastings

Seems recently, wine tasting around Easton has reached a new level of activity. The final week of June delivered no less than four extraordinary wine and food experiences offered by local establishments.

The week lead off with a unique wine tasting at Osteria Alfredo. Chef Alfredo, known to do things his way, offered a full house on Sunday evening a white wine only tasting with superb seafood pairings accompanying each course. The wines:

Vermentino Tenuta Guado al Tasso by Antinori

Soave / cav Giov Batt / Bertani

Bruno Giacosa Roero Arneis 2016

Castelmonte – Ipsus Passito di Pantelleria

About mid-week, the Talbot Country Club provided an outstanding Italian wine tasting along with skillfully paired food courses by Chef David. Club members left looking forward to the next opportunity to enjoy the fine food and wine. The wines:

Soligo Prosecco Brut NV, Treviso, Vento

Icardi. Cortese L’Aurora, 2015 Piemonte

Contesa Pecorino Abruzzo. DOC 2016

Icardi Surisjvan Nebbiolo Langhe DOC 2013, Castiglione Tinella, Piedmont

Cantine del Notaio L’Atto, Basilicata IGT 2014. Rionero in Vulture, Basilicata

Conte VIstarino Costiolo Sangue di Guida Dolce DOC 2015. Oltrepo Pavese, Lombardy

Bas Rouge in Easton describes itself as “a contemporary European restaurant offering an impeccable integration of fine dining, a world-class wine list, and elegant service.” All of this was certainly in evidence when they hosted California winemaker Helen Keplinger and her fine wine. The renowned Keplinger wines from California were paired with four courses by Chef Harley Peet. The wines:

Keplinger – Eldorado 2016

Keplinger – Basilisk 2015

Keplinger — Hangman’s 2016

Keplinger – Holdout 2009

Piazza with Dievole

Piazza Italian Market, which has been holding a series of unique and enjoyable wine tasting events in recent months, brought representatives from Italy’s Dievole winery to the market at the end of the week. Not only were Dievole’s wines sampled with enthusiasm, guests also were able to enjoy some of the extra virgin olive oil from Dievole. All of this with outstanding meats and cheeses from Piazza.

Dievole – Due Arbie Bianco IGT Toscana

Dievole – Due Arbie Chianti Superiore DOCG

Dievole – Chianti Classico DOCG

Podere Brizio – Rosso di Montalcino DOC

Brunello di Montalcino DOCG

The Olive Oil:

Chianti Classico E.V. Olive Oil DOP

100% Italiano E.V. Olive Oil

We should count ourselves fortunate to have caught the attention of some outstanding winemakers who recognize we in Talbot County have a taste for fine wine and thank those establishments bringing these wines to us along with wonderful and creative food pairings.

Food Friday: Cookout Season

Summer is here, and with all those hot, languid afternoons come the cookouts. As my Gentle Readers will remember, I live for summer and delegating the cooking responsibilities to Mr. Friday, who actually enjoys standing outside on the back porch, in 90-degree weather, hovering over a hot gas grill, tenderly flipping burgers, adjusting ears of corn, and prodding susurrus steaks. It is a fine seasonal division of labor.

I get to stay inside, enjoying cool air and cooler wine. I do my outdoor bit first thing in the morning. After I walk Luke the wonder dog for half an hour, I spray all exposed wobbly flesh with insect repellent, and then I charge out into the mosquito-infested side yard to water and weed the raised garden bed. And I harvest the crops.

This small garden has been our first proper vegetable garden in years. We had been getting by with container gardens of spindly tomatoes and etiolated bean plants. This year we are jokingly worried that Jack’s beanstalk will be tapping on the kitchen window soon, as the bean plants have grown up and out and soon we will find a magic goose in the back yard, pecking around with the robins. And yet – we have only harvested five measly beans. There must be more to this gardening than just planting seeds and rigging up strings for the beans to climb. We might have to analyze the soil, and consider when we should have planted the beans. In the meantime, though, the tomato plants are going to town.

We have been enjoying a surfeit of tomatoes: heirloom tomatoes, patio tomatoes, Tom’s Big Boy tomatoes. There are a dozen ripening tomatoes lining one of the kitchen windowsills right now. This is the second dozen that I have picked this week. It is probably just as well that we didn’t plant zucchini this year, or we would have been reduced to even more of a suburban stereotype than we already are. I guess this means I am finally going to have to introduce myself to the new neighbors, and hope that they like tomatoes.

Consequently I have had to do research and find more to do with tomatoes. I can’t just quarter them and throw them on top of a bed of crunchy iceberg. Luckily I can reduce our considerable tomato inventory if I make something large enough to share at a Fourth of July cookout. I have been pouring over this handy dandy cookbook,The Southerner’s Cookbook, from Garden & Gun Magazine. I love the folks at Food52, but the clever cooks from G&G indulge in gracious living. At least in the summer. (This is a killer cocktail: https://gardenandgun.com/slideshow/summer-south-20-must-try-recipes/7/)

If you, too, have tomato overload, try this recipe. It was divine. Even if I did have to steam an ear of corn, and cook two pieces of bacon. I always need something to complain about…

Heirloom Tomato Salad with Green Goddess Buttermilk Dressing

(SERVES 6)
6 ripe garden tomatoes, sliced inch thick
1/2 cucumber, thinly sliced
Kernels from 1 cooked ear Silver Queen corn
2 thick bacon slices, cooked and crumbled
1 tablespoon sliced fresh chives

Green Goddess Buttermilk Dressing

(MAKES ABOUT ¾ CUP)
1/3 cup whole buttermilk
1/3 cup mayonnaise
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 tablespoon sliced fresh chives
1 tablespoon chopped fresh dill
2 teaspoons chopped fresh tarragon

For the Heirloom Tomato Salad:  Arrange the tomato and cucumber slices artfully on a platter. Drizzle with half of the dressing. Sprinkle with the corn kernels and bacon. Garnish with the chives. Serve with extra dressing on the side. (Any remaining dressing will keep, refrigerated, for up to 1 week.)

For the Green Goddess Buttermilk Dressing: Combine the buttermilk, mayonnaise, lemon juice, Worcestershire sauce, salt, pepper, chives, dill, and tarragon in a blender. Blend until smooth.

https://gardenandgun.com/slideshow/summer-south-20-must-try-recipes/1/

“It’s difficult to think anything but pleasant thoughts while eating a homegrown tomato.”
– Lewis Grizzard

Spy Food: Brightwell’s Brendan Keegan Moves to Mason’s

The changes at Mason’s will get even better now Brendan Keegan has recently joined as Executive Chef. Keegan was most recently Co-Owner and Executive Chef at Brasserie Brightwell in Easton and was also Co-Owner and Executive Chef at 208 Talbot. Prior to coming to the Eastern Shore, he worked in some of the best restaurants on the East Coast, including Prune Restaurant in New York, NY and Kinkead’s American Brasserie in Washington, DC. He was trained at L’Academie de Cuisine in Gaithersburg, MD.

Brendan Keegan

Owner Chance Negri comments, “Brendan’s innovative and progressive cooking style coupled with honoring Eastern Shore food traditions will align with the vision for Mason’s of serving Modern American Cuisine.”

Mason’s Redux is so expanding its food offerings this summer with foods you know and love, reimagined with bold and distinctive flavors.

Chance comments, “People made suggestions and we listened. The response has been overwhelmingly positive to the changes we have made.”

Its expanded lunch menu now includes favorites like the Rachel Sandwich made with all-natural roasted turkey, Boursin cheese and homemade collard slaw, which rounds out its zesty flavor. Crab bisque with a pinch of old bay and touch of sherry, a salmon burger, braised roast beef cheese melt, Niçoise and Chef Salads are just a few of the other highly popular new offerings on Mason’s lunch menu. Mason’s Lamb Burger with homemade Tzatziki Sauce remains one of the restaurants best sellers. Sandwiches are now served with the popular Terra Chips and the dessert menu has added homemade ice cream from Nice Farms Creamery in Federalsburg for the summer season. Bob Miller and his family say, “We make ice cream the old-fashioned way, on their farm, ‘from cow to cup’ – rich and creamy, no preservatives, just pure delicious flavor.”

For dinner, Mason’s is offering a steak feature with different cuts of beef changing weekly, such as hangar steak, rib eye, tenderloin, and New York strip. Look for savory sauces such as watercress mayonnaise, horseradish, port and mushroom, roasted red pepper, or salsa verde to accompany the steak.

Sunday brunch is served from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and includes omelets/eggs served with sautéed fingerling potatoes, Strata, Mason’s legendary Cinnamon French Toast and Buttermilk Silver Dollar Pancakes with Grade A cardamom maple syrup. Savory additions to the brunch menu include Shaved Country Ham, salads and sandwiches, as well as the Lamb Burger. Libations include house made Blood Mary’s, White Peach Bellini’s, and Mimosas.

The bar menu has also been expanded to include mezze platters and small plates made for sharing, including lamb meatballs w/eggplant sauce, grilled shrimp w/chermoula sauce and a cheese course, as well as larger fare if patrons want a late lunch or light dinner. The wine list is diverse, and the bar is now offering Lyons Distillery Rum, a local favorite.

Pictured left to right are Chance Negri, Owner of Mason’s Redux 2017, with Zach Ray, Mason’s Manager, in front of the restaurant’s new signage.

Seasonal offerings, sourcing foods from local farmers and purveyors when possible, makes Mason’s dining experience even more memorable. Local tomatoes, corn, and berries will highlight the summer offerings.

Mason’s hosts private and corporate events and rehearsal dinners in its private rooms upstairs or in the garden.

Chance adds, “The old Mason’s was well-respected and well-known in the community with a loyal following. We have brought our own creative culinary twist to Mason’s and the response has been very positive.”

He adds, “I want to surprise people in a culinary way and provide a memorable dining experience, not just have the same old thing. I like to say, come to expect the unexpected and it’s good . . . very good!”

 

Mason’s is open for lunch from 11:30 to 2 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Sunday brunch is from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. The bar menu is offered between 3 and 6:30 p.m. daily. Dinner is offered on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Sundays from 5:30 to 9 p.m. and Thursday through Saturday from 5:30 to 10 p.m.

Captions:

Food Friday: Out of the Mouths of Babes

An impressive array of fruits and vegetables are ripening this very minute. As you sit reading this on your phone, I hope you have got some reusable shopping backs in the back of your car, and you are ready to hit the farmers’ markets with enthusiasm. You need to go stock up on blueberries and cherries. Right now. No delay. Because you can make the easiest desserts without worrying about anything but the deliciousness that comes with summer fruits.

I have finally reached an age where my son can share his own advice and recipes. This is one of the wonders of overlapping lives. Had I known this about him back when we were pacing the floor early in the morning, when he was wailing and wouldn’t sleep, when I discovered that the farm report on TV was a real thing, and not just a myth, it might have cheered my sleep-deprived self a little, and lifted my weary soul knowing that one day he would grow and thrive and be much taller than I was. That after the dark despair of those nights, I would one day be given a recipe for blueberry cobbler by a mewling, puking, outraged infant. Imagine that!

Chez Panisse’s Blueberry Cobbler (courtesy of the New York Times)
https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/9291-chez-panisses-blueberry-cobbler

INGREDIENTS
THE BERRIES:
4 ½ cups fresh blueberries
⅓ cup sugar
1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
THE DOUGH:
1 ½ cups all-purpose flour
½ teaspoon kosher salt
1 ½ tablespoons sugar
2 ¼ teaspoons baking powder
6 tablespoons cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
¾ cup heavy cream, plus additional for serving, if desired

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. To prepare the berries, place in a bowl and toss with the sugar and flour. Set aside.
To make the dough, mix the flour, salt, sugar and baking powder in a bowl. Cut in the butter until mixture resembles coarse meal. Add the cream and mix lightly, just until the dry ingredients are moistened.

Put the blueberries in a 1 1/2-quart gratin or baking dish. Make patties out of the dough, 2 to 2 1/2 inches in diameter and 1/2-inch thick. Arrange them over the top of the berries. Bake until the topping is brown and the juices bubble thickly around it, about 35 to 40 minutes.
Let cool slightly. Serve warm, with cream to pour on top, if desired.

Sadly, there is a hitch to my fairy tale: I prefer cherry crumble. I am not a big fan of baked blueberries, unless they come wrapped in a nice warm muffin. Forgive me, Tall One. Let me suggest that you try baking this cherry crumble this weekend, as one adult to another.

Fresh Cherry Crumble
(Thanks you, https://www.countryhillcottage.com/cherry-crumble/)

For cherry filling
2 lb / approximately 6 cups sweet cherries, cleaned and pitted
1/4 cup granulated sugar
3 tablespoons cornstarch

For the hazelnut streusel
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 cup brown sugar, cane sugar
1cup ground hazelnuts
2/3 cup cold unsalted butter, cut into cubes
1 teaspoon cinnamon

For decorating
confectioners’ sugar for decorating
1) Prep work
Preheat the oven to 350°F. Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper. Grease the ramekins or pie dish with butter, vegetable, oil or baking spray.

2) Cook the cherries
Add the cherries, granulated sugar, and corn starch into a heavy bottom saucepan and stir until well combined. Let the cherries macerate for 20 minutes to 1 hour, so the fruits soften and draw juice. If the cherries don’t draw a lot of moisture, add 3/4 – 1 cup water or cherry juice.  Then cook the cherries for 10 to 15 minutes, until the cherries soften, and the mixture thickens. Stir constantly, so the fruit doesn’t burn at the bottom of the saucepan.

3) Make the hazelnut streusel
Add the all-purpose flour, brown sugar, hazelnuts, cinnamon, and cold butter cubes into a large mixing bowl. And knead into a crumbly mixture. Use your fingertips to squeeze together the dough to form large clumps.

4) Bake the crumble
Spoon the cherry mixture into the prepared baking dish(es) and top with the streusel. Bake for 20 – 25 minutes. Dust with confectioner’s sugar and serve warm or cold with cream, or ice cream.

I’m not trying to have the last word. Really. I’ll make the Blueberry Cobbler for Mr. Friday. And he will be amazed, just like I was, that everyone is growing up and changing.

“And so with the sunshine and the great bursts of leaves growing on the trees, just as things grow in fast movies, I had that familiar conviction that life was beginning over again with the summer.”
― F. Scott Fitzgerald

Spy Food: St. Michaels Farmers Market Turns 20 Years Old

On Saturday, June 30th from 8:30 to 11:30am, the St. Michaels Farmers Market invites everyone to come on over to 204 S. Talbot St. in St. Michaels to join them in celebrating their 20th year of offering fresh, healthy, delicious items from regional farms and local producers to the Bay Hundred community.

The Market will be a busier-than-usual beehive of activity for its 20th birthday with free tastings from guest chefs, including longtime Talbot County resident, Michael Rork; “birthday cake” from Arlene’s Creations; ice cream donated by Justine’s; and a raffle of market baskets full of tasty items donated by vendors.

As always, customers, families and friends are invited to come together to not only shop but also celebrate summer and yummy foods. On the special Market birthday, customers will be treated to music by Cambridge-based band, Blackwater, who will offer their unique repertoire of rock, blues, reggae and bluegrass. With an ever expanding array of original songs, and their own versions of not-so-familiar covers, something new is always on the playlist!

The new leadership for the Market has grown it in several new directions this year. It’s ‘producer-only’ focus—meaning everything sold at the market is grown or produced by the person selling it—makes the St. Michaels Farmers Market a unique asset for the mid-Shore community. This year, they have expanded to include an adjacent lot, allowing for several new vendors, and have made the Market SNAP-friendly so that more people and community can purchase the fresh healthy meats, vegetables and other goods available.

To keep up with the St. Michaels Farmers Market and the celebration, check them out at www.facebook.com/loveyourfarmer.

Spy Report: Sipping Vermouth at Piazza

Easton’s Piazza Italian Market offered a wine tasting with a new twist, literally!

Emily Chandler, Piazza’s founder, teamed up with Washington, D.C. friend Kat Hamidi, Capitoline Vermouth co-creator, to produce a unique tasting experience. Four different offerings were poured and the participants were, as always, treated to a plate of wonderful pairings from Piazza.

Special agent 7 (00 Section) was there to file in a report.

This video is approximately one minute in length. For more information about Piazza please go here.

Food Friday: Father’s Day

We have a holiday family tradition. If the holiday is not food-centric (i.e. Thanksgiving=turkey) we usually try to have a good, buttery, messy, celebratory lobster dinner, complete with corn, beer and lots of laughter. I think a lot of laughter is called for these days, and so we will celebrate mightily on Father’s Day as we toss some bugs into the lobster pot. It will be an Instagram moment!

I read a lovely tribute to Anthony Bourdain the other day. Actually, every story about him has been a moving paean. What an incredible force of nature with an appetite for all the wonderful and mundane that the world offers up. I’m adding a link to a story about his daughter, and a food choice she made which delighted him. Lobster used to be the working man’s food of New England, not fussy or rarefied, or expensive. No candlelight is needed, nor is there any call for a maitre d’. I think Bourdain would approve of a simple lobster fest for Father’s Day. He would enthuse. Read this and see if you don’t agree with me: https://www.bonappetit.com/people/chefs/article/ever-wonder-how-anthony-bourdain-came-to-be-anthony-bourdain-and-what-he-looked-like-in-1972

A two-pound lobster, serving one, fetches $9.99 per pound this summer. (Conversely, ground chuck is $3.99 per pound, and I bet I can get four hamburgers from that pound.) Before lobster became a pricy treat, it was considered food good enough for servants and prison inmates. Colonial dock workers had a contract stating that they would NOT be fed lobster more than three times a week. People fed lobster to their cats. (https://psmag.com/economics/how-lobster-got-fancy-59440) Lobsters were abundant, easily caught, and simple to prepare. Lobster grew in popularity as the nation expanded west, and it began popping up on restaurant menus in hotels and on trains. It developed cachet. And as lobsters are not caught in South Dakota or Ohio, both the demand and appeal grew.

We steam our lobsters in a huge honking pot. Heartless as we are, we usually stage a lobster race on the kitchen floor. Our children have been deeply scarred as they watched the race participants being tossed into pots of boiling water.

Choose a pot large enough to hold all the lobsters comfortably; do not crowd them. A 4 to 5 gallon pot can handle 6 to 8 pounds of lobsters.
Put 2 inches of salted water in the bottom of a large kettle.
Set a steamer inside the pot and bring to a rolling boil over high heat.
Add the live lobsters one at a time, cover pot, and start timing.

It takes about 10 minutes for a 1-pound lobster, 12 minutes for 1 1/4 pounds, 18 minutes for 2-pounds. The shells will be bright red. Be sure to melt plenty of butter. https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/perfectly-steamed-lobster

Or, you can broil lobster tails: https://sweetcsdesigns.com/10-minute-perfect-broiled-lobster-tails-recipe/

You can skip right to the lobster roll and discover if you come from the butter camp or the mayonnaise camp: https://www.chowhound.com/recipes/lobster-rolls-29308

Or you can get Food52 fancy and poach them in oil: https://food52.com/recipes/4155-olive-oil-poached-fish-or-shellfish

I’m sure you and your group will find the ideal lobster recipe, and will write your own family’s chapter about lobster races on the kitchen floor. Enjoy your Father’s Day. Don’t spend money on a tie, buy a lobster! It will be much more memorable! Grab the gusto and torment your children!

“Lobsters display all three of the classical biological characteristics of an insect, namely: 1. It has way more legs than necessary. 2. There is no way you would ever pet it. 3. It does not respond to simple commands such as ‘Here, boy!’”
-Dave Barry

https://www.history.com/news/a-taste-of-lobster-history

Food Friday: Summer Prep

Now that we are finally drying out from all the May and early June showers, it seems appropriate to turn our thoughts to summer and the last day of school. Faithful (or long-suffering) Food Friday readers will remember that once the heat of summer sets in, I do my best to skeedaddle out of the kitchen. I do not enjoy hovering around the stove when I could be lounging gracefully in the shade, clad in floaty white linen, reading important books, and drinking cool wine.

The reality of my humdrum existence, however, means that I still have to plan for night-time meals, because Mr. Friday must be fed. And so I must find foods that meet the basic summer criteria: one-dish meals which don’t heat up the kitchen. And despite my deeply-flawed and lazy-damn-git nature, I do enjoy sitting down at the end of the day, sharing a meal, and catching up. I will even open a can of tuna for that man.

I do rely on a heavy rotation of salads in the summer. Last night we had a chicken salad that is always in a summer staple. I’m not sure it serves any healthy purpose – it contains mayonnaise, bacon, and croutons fried in bacon. But it is deelish. I boiled the chicken while I was eating a lunch sandwich made from Monday night’s leftover tuna salad. (Mayonnaise is a valuable commodity in our house in the summer.)

Chris’s Chicken Club Salad
serves 4

1/2 pound bacon, crisp and crumbled (save the fat)
1 cup bread cubes
3 cups cooked chicken, cubed and chilled
2 large tomatoes, quartered (or a handful of cherry tomatoes, halved)
1 head Romaine, torn (not cut) into bite-size piece

Dressing:
3/4 cup mayonnaise
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon fresh parsley, chopped
1 tablespoon fresh chives, chopped
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
1/2 teaspoon Lawry’s Seasoning Salt
1/2 teaspoon dried basil
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1 tablespoon capers

Sauté the bread cubes in the bacon fat, tossing constantly to toast all the sides. Drain on paper towels. Sprinkle with garlic powder, Lawry’s Seasoning Salt, and dried basil. Put the chicken in a bowl, cover with dressing, add the capers and toss to coat each piece with dressing. Chill for half an hour. Arrange lettuce on individual plates and mound the chicken salad on the lettuce. Crumble the bacon on top, surround with tomato quarters and top each with the crunchy, wonderful croutons. Serve with a delectable Chardonnay. Yummm. Perfect for picnics.

Here is a variation on that salad which might actually be good for you:

Kosher salt and pepper
1 1/2 pounds cooked boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cubed
1/4 cup low fat sour cream
2 tablespoons mayonnaise
4 radishes
2 stalks celery
1 small green apple
2 scallions

In a large bowl, whisk together the sour cream, mayonnaise and salt and pepper. Add the chicken and toss to coat.
Add the radishes, celery, apple and scallions and mix to combine.

It is a spicier salad, incorporating peppery radishes. Normally I eat radishes sitting out on the back porch in the summer, filching them one by one from a bowl filled with ice water, the spicy radish bite tempered by the icy coolth of the water. And maybe sometimes I’ll be fancy, and swipe a schmear of butter on a radish, using the fancy French butter for something other than warm bread.

This is a very continental approach to take with radishes, which appeals to my languorous inner life: wash and gently dry a handful of radishes. Serve the radishes with slightly softened high fat content butter and a bowl of fleur de sel sea salt. Maybe it is Saturday night, and you could add some crusty French bread and the casual insouciance of a glass or two of Prosecco. Yumsters.

If you feel the ridiculous compulsion to serve a hot meal, here is an interesting pasta, with radishes added at the end: https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/strozzapreti-carbonara-with-radishes

Radishes are high in Vitamin C, are low cal (about 1 calorie per radish, until you add the schmear of butter) and provide cheerful color and bite to an everyday salad. You will thank me come August, when your crowd is surly, and will not eat one more cool vegetable, and is screaming for meatloaf and mashed potatoes. Until then, we have the radishes, chicken salads, and the occasional glass of wine.

Here are some radish varieties to tickle your tongue on your way to the farmers’ market: Watermelon, White Icicle, Cherry Belle (what we usually see in the grocery store), Sparkler White Tip, French Breakfast, Easter egg, Black Spanish, White Beauty, Early Scarlet Gold, Daikon Long White, Fire and Ice and China Rose.

Here are some more radish recipes: https://www.bonappetit.com/test-kitchen/ingredients/article/radish-guide

“Long stormy spring-time, wet contentious April, winter chilling the lap of very May; but at length the season of summer does come.”
-Thomas Carlyle