Food: The Buzz on BeeGeorge

Being surrounded by approximately half a million bees is not necessarily on everyone’s comfort level. But that’s what happened when Chesapeake Harvest visited one of our honey suppliers, George Meyer (aka BeeGeorge.) in Oxford, MD. We were instructed to wear a long-sleeved shirt and long pants, but despite the almost 80-degree weather, added a winter jacket and boots for the extra protection we thought we’d need.

After BeeGeorge outfitted us in the standard beekeepers’ hat and long gloves, we watched as he lightly and bare-handedly moved a swarm to a ‘roomier location.’ As the bees noisily buzzed around us, we asked for reassurances: how many times has he been bitten, could they come through the netting to bite our face, etc. He corrected us: It’s a sting, not a bite. Semantics. Either way, we wanted to experience neither.

We then moved into a large area containing numerous ‘wooden boxes.’ BeeGeorge’s honey is well-known in this area, but we also learned he sells starter hives to new beekeepers. Known as ‘nucs’ these fully functional small hives include a laying queen, which he explained, “We’re going to tag!”

Opening a nuc, he removed each of the five frames containing either brood or pollen. He located and removed the queen, again with no protection on his hands, put her in a special ‘cage,’ where he marked her with a small spot of paint on her back, before gently returning her to her colony.

It wasn’t too long after that we ditched the bulky gloves with the realization that everything we thought about bees had changed. Before leaving, we asked what each of us can do to protect these miraculous creatures. BeeGeorge advised:

Plant flowers.
Buy local honey.
Don’t spray insecticides or weed killer, if possible. But if you do—
Don’t spray when it’s windy.
Don’t spray your flowers.
Spray at first or last light.
Mow before spraying.
Mow but don’t kill your dandelions and clover.

Chesapeake Harvest proudly carries BeeGeorge’s honey on our online marketplace/farmer’s market of locally produced food and food-related products.

Chesapeake Harvest is an organization working to build a vibrant local food economy, producing healthy food, expanding economic opportunities for Delmarva farmers, and growing new markets for local food. For more information, go to https://chesapeakeharvest.com/

Brewer’s Art and Orchard Point Oyster Teamed Up to Create Tasty Brew

The Brewer’s Art of Baltimore, MD, and Orchard Point Oyster Company of Stevensville, MD, have teamed up to produce a light, oyster beer that’s drinkable all year long – “Bugeye: Oyster S’Light”. The beer is brewed using local Orchard Point oyster shells and a new RoastOat™ malt donated by Briess Malt of Wisconsin. A portion of the proceeds will benefit healthy waterways across the Eastern Shore through the work of ShoreRivers. Bugeye drinks like a full, rich stout, but is a gorgeous hazy golden color, with lovely fruit notes and a dense rocky head of lacy white foam. Smooth as silk, brilliant as a golden sunset – it’s like nothing you’ve tasted this summer.

The Brewer’s Art has brewed craft beer in Baltimore since 1996. It has produced many award-winning beers and its brewpub restaurant is consistently ranked as one the city’s best restaurants. Named the Best Beer Bar in America by Esquire Magazine in 2008, the Brewer’s Art supports clean water via partnerships with organizations such as ShoreRivers.

Orchard Point Oyster Company has been raising premium half-shell oysters since 2015. Originating in Rock Hall, it has expanded to operate in Kent, Queen Anne’s, and Talbot county waters. Through its sustainable modern aquaculture practices, it continuously improves water quality via filtration and provides ecological services to the Bay ecosystem. Each adult oyster can filter up to 50 gallons of water per day. Orchard Point’s farming practices are recognized by the EPA and State of Maryland as a Best Management Practice (BMP) in meeting mandatory Bay nutrient reduction goals. The shells are a representation of these efforts and lend the beer essential minerals.

Briess is a global leader in malt and brewing ingredients. Stemming from Czech roots, they currently produce more styles of malt than any other malting company in the world. The malt used in this beer is a brand-new hull-less, lightly roasted oat variety: “Blonde RoastOat™ Malt.” The malt produces a unique beer with a mild sweetness and blonde hue. A velvet mouthfeel and aroma are balanced by calcium and chloride additions from the oyster shells.

ShoreRivers is a local non-profit dedicated to improving water quality on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. With six major shore tributaries under their purview, ShoreRivers works to improve the health of our waterways through science based advocacy, restoration, and education initiatives. It is the organization when it comes to understanding our rivers’ health and implementing projects that have a direct effect on improving it.

We are excited to announce the release of Bugeye. Each Bugeye brewed and consumed, will directly contribute to the restoration of the Chesapeake Bay. Bringing together industry leaders and clean-water advocates can certainly yield delicious results. Please support this effort by asking for a Bugeye, wherever fine beer is served on tap!

Big Veggies and Local Support of St. Michaels Farmers Market

Christmas in St. Michaels Board Members. Front Row L-R: Pat Martin, Barbara Rose. Back Row L-R: SMFM, Treasurer T. Dixon, Joan Schneider, Linda Seemans and Ginny Cornwall.

The St. Michaels Farmers Market is honored to announce support from Christmas in St. Michaels. The non-profit market supportslocally producer-only farmers market operations.  Founded in 1998, SMFM provides fresh, locally sourced foods, education and outreach and economic options for farmers and food producers.  The SMFM also participates in SNAP/EBT, WIC, FMNP and Senior Voucher programs. The market is open Saturdays in St. Michaels, at the public parking lot located at 204 S Talbot Street. 8:30-11:30 AM, through November 17, rain or shine.  For more information or to volunteer see our Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/loveyourfarmer/ Mailing address: 606A N. Talbot St. Suite 113, St. Michaels MD.

For over 33 years Christmas in St. Michaels has provided resources to assist local non-profit groups enhance the quality of life for residents of the Bay Hundred Community.  www.christmasinstmichaels.org

Bountiful, Jamie Merida Interiors Announce Move to Gateway to Easton

Jamie Merida with staff

The Bountiful Interiors family of brands has announced the acquisition of a 16,000 square foot building located at the corner of U.S. Route 50 and Goldsborough Street in Easton, just across from The Country School. The property will serve as the new home of Bountiful Home, Bountiful Flooring, and Jamie Merida Interiors. Renovations are well underway and the new location is on track to open in late summer.

“We are thrilled to have found the perfect location at the Gateway to Easton,” said Jamie Merida, owner of Bountiful. “This year is our twentieth anniversary, so we have a lot to celebrate! It was the right time for us to buy a property that is large enough to house the entire company under one roof.”

Once renovations are complete, the building will feature an open floor plan with distinct areas for each part of the business. There will be a large furniture showroom for Bountiful Home, which will include much-needed space to expand the store’s selection of home accents and gifts. Bountiful Flooring will have an adjoining showroom that will allow for an expanded selection of flooring, carpet, stone and tile, and Hunter Douglas window treatments.

There are also plans to build a new mezzanine that overlooks the furniture showroom within the first year. The mezzanine will house the Jamie Merida Interiors design studio.“We’re fortunate that our interior design services continue to grow like wildfire,” said Merida. “We’re currently looking to hire new designers and need much more space for the studio. Adding the second level will really help us maximize the building’s potential.”

In addition to housing the Bountiful brands, the property will be home to Turnbridge Talbot, a new bakery and café by owners Rob Griffith and Chef Steve Konopelski. Konopelski is a pastry chef who has earned a strong local following through his flagship bakery Turnbridge Point in Denton and his many appearances on Food Network. Turnbridge Talbot will offer daily selections of pastries, breads, and cakes, as well as grab-and-go gourmet sandwiches and salads. The café will provide seating and free WiFi. Guests will also have a view of the cake decorating room where Konopelski will produce all of his couture wedding cakes.

“We’ve had customers asking for an Easton location for a long time,” said Konopelski. “We’re thrilled we can tell them that it’s finally happening!” Konopelski said the new location will not affect Turnbridge Point in Denton. “We will continue to offer all the same treats and events at our original location,” said Konopelski.

Merida said incorporating Turnbridge Talbot into the new building made a lot of sense for both businesses. “We love that our customers will be able to grab a coffee and a treat while they shop. And between interior design and cake design, there’s going to be so much creativity happening under one roof!”

Bountiful will continue to operate at its current locations in the Talbot Towne Shopping Center until the new building opens later this summer. Project updates and photos will be shared on Bountiful’s social media accounts and its website, JamieMerida.com.

About Bountiful: The Bountiful family of brands includes Bountiful Home, an award-winning retailer of furnishings, home accents, gifts, and one-of-a-kind antiques and handcrafted items; Bountiful Flooring, a retail store offering flooring, carpet, stone and tile, and Hunter Douglas window treatments; and Jamie Merida Interiors, the region’s premier interior design firm. Located in Easton, Maryland, Bountiful is known for its “traditional made modern” aesthetic. The Jamie Merida Interiors design studio serves clients throughout the Mid-Atlantic region and beyond. The studio’s work has been featured in leading publications, such as Southern Home, Romantic Homes, Home & Design, Chesapeake Views, The Cottage Journal, and House Beautiful. Owner Jamie Merida designs a furniture and home accents collection under the brand Jamie Merida Collection for Chelsea House. For more information, please visit jamiemerida.com.

DrinkMaryland Returns to the Town of Centreville

DrinkMaryland returns to Centreville on Saturday, June 15 from 12:00pm to 5:00pm. The market-like event will pop up for the afternoon at Lawyers Row and Broadway. Featuring ten Maryland wineries and nineteen breweries and distilleries, this gathering is an opportunity for
consumers to explore and learn about Maryland-made products.

The 2019 DrinkMaryland event series will pop up in three Maryland cities this summer. Kicking off in Gaithersburg on June 7, DrinkMaryland makes stops in Centreville on June 15 and in North Beach on June 29. Produced by the Maryland Wineries Association and the Town of Centreville, the DrinkMaryland series brings local wineries, breweries, and distilleries together with local artisans, musicians, and food vendors.

Unlike traditional wine tasting events, the DrinkMaryland series is an open marketplace for visitors to explore. Tasting passes allowing the sampling of wine, cider, mead, beer, and distilled spirits are available to buy; though, public entry to these events is free.

WHO: Maryland Wineries Association, Town of Centreville, attending public, and media

WHAT: DrinkMaryland: Centreville

WHERE: Lawyers Row & Broadway, Centreville, Maryland 21617

WHEN: Saturday, June 15, 2019, 12:00-5:00PM

Members of Maryland Wineries Association and participating vendors can be scheduled for interviews through Jim Bauckman.

Mid-Shore Food: Jordan Lloyd Takes Over Eagle’s Cafe

It’s not often that you hear of people going out of their way to have lunch at a golf course. But then again not many golf courses have chef Jordan Lloyd taking over the Eagle’s Café at the Hog Neck Golf Course. Featuring a new and tempting menu which ranges from pulled pork BBQ sandwiches to pasture-raised beef burger, there are two things hungry clients can count on: they’re going to get an affordable, delicious meal and, as much as possible, the produce will be locally grown and raised. That’s because Lloyd is passionate about both quality and the farm-to-table model, and he has a plan to show others in the food and hospitality companies how it can benefit both the community and local economy.

The idea probably began when he and wife Alice opened Bartlett Pear Inn Restaurant in 2009. “We never intended on being a farm-to-table restaurant,” he says. “We never thought of this as a concept. This was just our way of life. We wanted to open up a really great restaurant, and I was always taught that the way to do that is through providing the highest quality available. We do that by making sure we know where our products are coming from, and we make sure that they’re at the freshest peak value that they can be.”

But running a successful fine-dining eatery that only had 30 seats, was not making financial sense and in 2016 they decided to close the restaurant while continuing to operate the Inn. The lessons learned, however, were invaluable and ones he felt he could teach others to do. They included: how to create superior food, how to hire quality management, how to incorporate fresh local produce, and how to create the right atmosphere to attract clients who appreciated quality service. He turned his focus to Hambleton House, LLC, the contracting and consulting company he and Alice formed when they first went into business. Through Hambleton House, Jordan Lloyd would use his vision to transform the hospitality and food business, all while supporting the local economy.

After taking on a couple of DC-based restaurants. Lloyd invigorated their recipes, changed their menus, and trained new staff. The reshaped businesses picked up new customers and rave reviews. With those accomplishments under his belt, he began looking for something local that fit the scope of his dreams. It appeared when Nauti’s, the new seafood restaurant project at the Ferry Point Marina, asked him to oversee and design their kitchen operations. Despite that project being currently on hold due to permit issues, other opportunities arose as his successes became known.

The next venture was the retirement community, Londonderry on the Tred Avon. Lloyd redesigned their menus, hired a chef, and brought in Chesapeake Harvest to provide some locally sourced foods to the restaurants. Chesapeake Harvest, part of the Easton Economic Development Corporation, connects farmers to the consumers (both wholesale and retail) through an online farmer’s market that Lloyd helped create. “The carbon footprint impact with Londonderry buying local is huge, he said. “That’s thousands of dollars a year in the pockets of local farmers.” But his excitement didn’t end there. “The residents were coming to me saying, ‘Jordan, ever since you started cooking here my feet don’t swell. Ever since you started cooking here, I don’t have headaches like I used to.’ I mean, we are making real nutritional impacts with food. In the past, if their feet were swelling, they may have taken medicine. Now, it’s being helped with good nutritious food.”

Which brings us back to the Eagle’s Café at the golf course. Right now, Lloyd says, they’re able to tap into the best of what is available locally. “The café is serving Hummingbird Farm tomatoes. It has Bramble Blossoms Farm lettuces. It has Shi-Mar Farms pork shoulder. All available like good local products at a concession stand.” Affordable, locally sourced, flavorful food, served in a beautiful setting excellent has led to some fantastic feedback from clients. “It was just a matter of resetting the facility with products and a nice menu,” he says. He’s equally proud that the ‘amazing foundation of employees,’ despite all the changes, are enthusiastic and want to remain with the café.

And that’s the whole point Lloyd feels. “If you’re bringing in Hambleton House you are bringing in a company that has a constant pursuit for higher quality. We will be relentless for that pursuit because we believe that’s what makes great businesses great. The quality that they execute and that quality is not just food and beverage, but it’s also in its people and its atmosphere, and it’s in its presentation. So, it’s quality across the board is really our pursuit.

Next on their client list is Pope’s Tavern in Oxford. “I’m there to set them up with a business plan,” Lloyd says. “Really good food for sure, but on a consistent level that the staff on-site can execute consistently with quality and with understanding. For example, if they’re ever having trouble with a particular soup, I’m either going to work extra hard to train them on making it correctly, or we’re just going to change it to something easier for them to execute.”

Lloyd also sees Hambleton House’s mission as being an incubator for other businesses. Starting June 1st, Amanda Cook, a world-class pastry chef and baker will be moving into the area and starting a wholesale baking company at the Bartlett Pear Inn kitchen. Lloyd, looking at the future, doesn’t discount a storefront retail situation, but for now, the focus will be to support her on the wholesale side.

Not surprising, Hambleton House’s reach has extended beyond the restaurants and cafés. As part of a task force, Lloyd has been meeting and working with Maryland Delegates and Senators to create a state level bill called Maryland Food for Maryland Institutions. The goal of this proposal is to mandate that a percentage of all food procured by state institutions be bought from in-state farms. “Imagine how this impacts the farmers in our area,” Lloyd says. The bill is expected to become law within the year.

Stay tuned. There is much to be done and much that Jordan and Alice Lloyd would like to accomplish. “I would say our mission as a couple and as community participants is that we really do care. We care a tremendous amount about the success of the community and anything that we can do to support the efforts of our community business leaders or community aspects, we’re 100% there.”

Val Cavalheri is a recent transplant to the Eastern Shore, having lived in Northern Virginia for the past 20 years. She’s been a writer, editor and professional photographer for various publications, including the Washington Post.

Wine Notes: Simpatico-Scossa Wine Dinner Set for Friday April 26

Bobbi Parlett of Simpatico, Italy’s Finest Noah Stevens, owner of Global Wines, are very excited to welcome Dr. Martin Kerres of Toscana Valdonica to the USA from the Maremma area of Tuscany for a special “Release Party” wine dinner at Scossa Restaurant & Lounge Friday April 26th at 7 PM in association with WineFest at St. Michaels. Dr. Kerres will be introducing selections of his wonderful organic line of wines to the USA in Maryland at this dinner and also at Simpatico’s Italian venue at WineFest.

Dr. Kerres will speak about his story of his vision for the winery, his small passionate artisan team and the history of the vineyard in a unique place in Tuscany in the hills of Maremma which produce his limited production unique award winning wines. The wines literally just arrived into the USA.

Giancarlo Tondin of Scossa Restaurant and Lounge and Bobbi Parlett have planned a fabulous evening with Dr. Kerres with a dinner menu to pair with a selection of the Valdonica wines. Call Scossa 410-822-2202 for reservations or call Bobbi on 610-209-5409 for information.

Food Summit in Kent County February 22nd

On Friday, February 22nd, the University of Maryland Extension Office in Kent County is holding a Food Summit from 8am until 12:15pm at the Emmanuel Church in Chestertown. The summit will bring together growers/producers, recipients of food donations as well as various community organizations that could help in identifying people or places in need of extra food. The goal of the summit is to find answers to questions such as:

• Do we have excess produce/food in Kent County?
• What, if anything, happens to this produce?
• Who can use extra produce and what kind is most desirable?
• Where can people get excess produce?
• How can your organization help?
• Can we come up with a plan to get food to where it is needed most?

Three separate panels will try to address these questions. By the end of the summit, we should have the beginnings of a plan on how to distribute excess produce this upcoming growing season.

Growers Panel: Bob Arnold, Jen Baker, Barbara Ellis, Theresa Mycek, Wayne Gilchrest.

Recipients: Dave Menzie (Community Food Pantry), Cheryl Hoopes (Community Table, First United Methodist Church), representative from Mt. Olive AME, John Queen (Reconnect for Life).

Other agencies: Amy Cawley (MD Food Bank), Rosey Ramsey Granillo (LMB), Emily Vooris or Lynn Rubin (FSNE), Elizabeth Massey (WAC, Food Recovery Network).

The event is supported by the following local entities: Chester River Wine and Cheese Co., the Emmanuel Church, Evergrain Bread Company, Figg’s Ordinaty and Play it Again Sam.

The event is free and open to the public, but attendees are encouraged to register by calling 410-778-1661, emailing sharvey1@umd.edu or by registering online at Eventbrite (Food Summit).

“The University of Maryland is an Equal Opportunity Employer and Equal Access Programs”

Piazza Italian Market Kicked Off its Monthly Food and Wine Pairings

Piazza Italian Market kicked off its 2019 season of monthly Food and Wine Pairings featuring the island of Sardinia which is the second largest island in the Mediterranean Sea. The Tyrrhanean Sea separates Sardinia from the west coast of Italy. The geography of Sardinia ranges from sandy beaches to the mountainous interior with hiking trails through the ubiquitous macchia shrubbery. The rugged landscape is dotted with thousands of “nuraghi”-curious bee-shaped ruins dating from the Bronze Age, remnant of the Nuragic civilization that lasted nearly twenty centuries until the Roman conquest.

The Argiolas Winery is the largest and foremost wine estate on Sardinia. It produces archetypal wines from native varietals and was the first on the island to convert to modern viticulture in the pursuit of quality over quantity. Its vineyards are located in Serdiana in the Trexenta hills just north of the capital of Cagliari. Argiolas farms 600 acres of native Sardinian grapes including Nuragus, Monica, and Cannonau.

As guests were seated, plates of Caciocavallo cheese with Pane Carasau (Sardinian thin cracker bread) awaited them. For the first pairing, the Argiolas S’elegas Nuragus di Cagliari DOC was paired with grilled octopus over roasted potatoes with preserved lemon and capers. The grape is 100% Nuragus, a white grape that is thought to have been brought to Sardinia by the ancient Phoenicians. The distinctive wine label features one of the Nuraghi bee hive forms. Flavors of lemons and peaches, undertones of nuts and herbs, bright acidity, light body, and a slightly bitter finish made a perfect pairing with the octopus. The pairing was a hit with the guests and one of my friends asked if Piazza would add the octopus salad to its menu.

For the second pairing, the Argiolas Costera Cannonau di Sardegna DOC was paired with “fregolotto”;very small, round pasta with grape tomatoes (the toasted Sardinian pasta is cooked as a risotto with a saffron broth).The grape is 100% Cannonau, which is the local name of the granache grape. Since Sardinia was on the Mediterranean ancient trade route, this grape was likely brought to Sardinia from the Iberian peninsula where is has become the principal red grape of Sardinia.Costera, a name referring to hills, is the workhorse red grape of Sardinia that produces a deeply-colored, full-bodied red wine. Flavors of very ripe strawberries, black cherries, herbs, and spices and aging in French oak barriques provide rounded tannins and flavors of vanilla.

For the third pairing, the Vigne Surrau Isola dei Nuraghi IGT 2015, was paired with Panadas (savory pastry) filled with braised lamb and potatoes. Vigne Surrau is a newer winery founded by a former industrialist family.The vineyards are located in the sunny valleys of Gallura, a region in the northeast part of Sardinia. The grape is 100% Syrah, and Surrau has won five awards to date, including Tre Bicchieri from Gambero Rosso,  for its vintage 2009—the equivalent of 95+ points from Wine Spectator.

Emily has set the bar high for our 2019 food and wine pairings so mark your calendars for Piazza’s  winter offerings:

February 9Abruzzo

Buy tickets now https://bit.ly/2G9SEXq deadline Feb 8 at 5 PM

February 26: Wine Dinner A five-course wine dinner with special guest Catarina Sartarelli of the Sartarelli family winery.  Piazza will be Ms. Sartarelli’s only wine event in the area. Chef Chris and Emily will create a very special menu to accompany the all-Verdicchio line up from Sartarelli.

Buy tickets now https://bit.ly/2CTdAPf

March 9:Alto Adige

Spy Wine Notes: The Sardinia Food-Wine Report

Piazza Italian Market kicked off its 2019 season of monthly Food and Wine Pairings featuring the island of Sardinia which is the second largest island in the Mediterranean Sea. The Tyrrhanean Sea separates Sardinia from the west coast of Italy. The geography of Sardinia ranges from sandy beaches to the mountainous interior with hiking trails through the ubiquitous macchia shrubbery. The rugged landscape is dotted with thousands of “nuraghi”-curious bee-shaped ruins dating from the Bronze Age, remnants of the Nuragic civilization that lasted nearly twenty centuries until the Roman conquest.

The Argiolas Winery is the largest and foremost wine estate on Sardinia. It produces archetypal wines from native varietals and was the first on the island to convert to modern viticulture in the pursuit of quality over quantity. Its vineyards are located in Serdiana in the Trexenta hills just north of the capital of Cagliari. Argiolas farms 600 acres of native Sardinian grapes including Nuragus, Monica, and Cannonau.

As guests were seated, plates of Caciocavallo cheese with Pane Carasau (Sardinian thin cracker bread) awaited them. For the first pairing, the Argiolas S’elegas Nuragus di Cagliari DOC was paired with grilled octopus over roasted potatoes with preserved lemon and capers. The grape is 100% Nuragus, a white grape that is thought to have been brought to Sardinia by the ancient Phoenicians. The distinctive wine label features one of the Nuraghi bee hive forms. Flavors of lemons and peaches, undertones of nuts and herbs, bright acidity, light body, and a slightly bitter finish made a perfect pairing with the octopus. The guests agreed and one of them asked me if Piazza would add the octopus salad to the menu.

For the second pairing, the Argiolas Costera Cannonau di Sardegna DOC was paired with “fregolotto”; very small, round pasta with grape tomatoes (the toasted Sardinian pasta is cooked as a risotto with a saffron broth). The grape is 100% Cannonau, which is the local name of the granache grape. Since Sardinia was on the Mediterranean ancient trade route, this grape was likely brought to Sardinia from the Iberian peninsula where is has become the principal red grape of Sardinia. Costera, a name referring to hills, is the workhorse red grape of Sardinia that produces a deeply-colored, full-bodied red wine. Flavors of very ripe strawberries, black cherries, herbs, and spices and aging in French oak barriques provide rounded tannins and flavors of vanilla.

For the third pairing, the Vigne Surrau Isola dei Nuraghi IGT 2015, was paired with Panadas (savory pastry) filled with braised lamb and potatoes. Vigne Surrau is a newer winery founded by a former industrialist family. The vineyards are located in the sunny valleys of Gallura, a region in the northeast part of Sardinia. The grape is 100% Syrah, and Surrau has won five awards to date, including Tre Bicchieri from Gambero Rosso,  for its vintage 2009—the equivalent of 95+ points from Wine Spectator.

Emily has set the bar high for Piazza’s 2019 food and wine pairings so mark your calendars for next month’s offerings:

February 9:  Abruzzo

Buy tickets now, deadline Feb 8 at 5 PM

February 26: Wine Dinner  A five-course wine dinner with special guest Catarina Sartarelli of the Sartarelli family winery. Piazza will be Ms. Sartarelli’s only wine event in the area. Chef Chris and Emily will create a very special menu to accompany the all-Verdicchio line up from Sartarelli.  Tickets here.

 

 

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