Project WILD Professional Development is Aug. 3 at Adkins Arboretum

Adkins Arboretum will host Project WILD, a professional development workshop about wildlife and conservation, for K–12 teachers on Sat., Aug. 3 from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Presented by Kerry Wixted, wildlife education and outreach specialist with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, the workshop is perfect for teachers in both formal and informal settings, as well as anyone with an interest in environmental education.

A project of the Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies, Project WILD is dedicated to helping students learn how to think, not what to think, about wildlife and the environment. All curriculum materials are back by sound education practices and theory and represent the work of many within the fields of education and natural resource management from across the country.

The workshop will cover pollination, field investigations, inquiry-based learning and more. All participants will receive two free Project WILD guides filled with more than 100 lesson plans. The course counts as professional development for Maryland Green Schools and for Maryland Master Naturalists.

The Project WILD workshop is $25 for Arboretum members and $30 for non-members. Advance registration is required at adkinsarboretum.org or by calling 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

Adkins Arboretum is a 400-acre native garden and preserve at the headwaters of the Tuckahoe Creek in Caroline County. Open year round, the Arboretum offers educational programs for all ages about nature and gardening. For more information, visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

Spy Habitat House of the Week: Hanson Historic

This house in the heart of Easton’s Historic District has a generous lot with a wide side yard and deep rear yard surrounded by fencing or landscaped for privacy. One of my own favorite past homes was an American Four-Square like this house with its wrap-around front porch.  Part of this porch has been infilled with windows to make a sunroom and I appreciated how the continuous wall of windows was carefully detailed to look as if the sunroom had been original to the house. I especially liked the elevation from the street with a dense hedge along the right side and a white picket fence along the sidewalk framing the front elevation with the three-bay porch, second floor windows below the hipped roof broken by a center gable and attic accent window. The roomy front porch depth has a swing and Adirondack rocking chairs for relaxing. 

The front door at the right side porch bay opens onto a spacious entrance hall with light filtering from the window of the “U” shaped stairs to the second floor.  The stairs are beautifully detailed with wood newel posts and top rail with painted paneled stringers and spindles. I was charmed by the petite powder room tucked under the stairs with its small patterned wallpaper and the white porcelain wall mounted lavatory with a scalloped edge and floral accents. Beyond the entrance hall is the kitchen with light green cabinets and butcher block countertops and the pantry/laundry with a view to the lush rear yard. 

A wide wall opening with built-in millwork connects the dining room at the front of the house to the sunroom with its tall casement windows that open to transform this room a screened porch.  The original parlor with side windows is a cozy space to relax by the fireplace.  

Part of the house’s original rear wall was removed for an expansion to create a spacious multi-purpose room.  A long window seat with pillows is the perfect spot for curling up with a favorite book and the upholstered rattan seating group at the rear corner and antique pieces and plants with views of the rear landscaped yard creates a charming and private space.

All the second floor bedrooms were more spacious than you would expect in an older house. The rooms were daylit from windows on at least two sides. All the bedrooms had good sized closets and one bedroom had a nook with a large closet that could also be a sitting area.  Stylish historic architecture, great ground floor plan with easy flow among the rooms, spacious bedrooms and a landscaped lot with a pool-all this and a Historic District location too!

For more information about this property, contact Kathryn Bogan with Shoreline Realty, Inc,  at 410-822-7556 (o), 410-310-6814 (c) or vipvacationrentals.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity”.

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

July Pollinator Programs at Adkins Arboretum

Solitary bee. Photo courtesy of Pollinators Prospering People.

Adkins Arboretum will host a trio of programs this month aimed at educating about pollinators, their needs and ways to increase their vital habitat. All programs will be led by Melinda Fegler and Lindsay Hollister of Pollinators Prospering People (PX3), a nonprofit dedicated to promoting sustainable pollinator habitat. Programs include:

Befriending Bumblebees, 1–4 p.m. on Sun., July 14. Learn about the bumble’s importance for wildlife and for humans’ edible gardens. Participants will learn Maryland bumble ID and how to design a garden to attract bumblebees, as well as build a bumblebee hive box.

Solitary Bee Beginnings, 1–4 p.m. on Sun., July 21. What is a solitary bee? Learn about the ecology, life cycles and groupings of these lone workers. Participants will also learn about garden additions for solitary bees, build a solitary bee condo and practice identification.

Caterpillars to Butterflies, 1–4 p.m. on Sun., July 28. Learn about the mysteries of and threats to these beautiful pollinators and the important role they play in the natural world. Participants will build a chrysalis tree, learn to use identification resources and practice skills during a NABA butterfly count.

Each program is $35 for Arboretum members and $40 for non-members. All three sessions count as continuing education for Master Gardeners and for Maryland Master Naturalists. Advance registration is required at adkinsarboretum.org or by calling 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

Chesapeake Bay Herb Society Program on Decorative Gourds

Stephanie Wooton, horticulturalist, will lead a workshop on decorative gourds as part of the July 11th Chesapeake Bay Herb Society meeting.  A limited number of assorted gourds will be provided to make birdhouses or scoops.  There will be plenty of seeds to take home.

Stephanie attended the University of Wisconsin and later received a degree in horticulture from the University of Maryland.  She was horticulturist at Garden Treasures for 17 years and just retired after 5 years at Unity Nursery in Church Hill.

The meeting will be held at the Christ Church Parish Hall, 111 S. Harrison Street in Easton, starting at 6:00pm.

The Herb Society was formed in 2002 to share knowledge of herbs with the local Eastern Shore community.  It is a non-profit organization which welcomes guests to share in the joys of cultivating, harvesting and using herbs.  For more information call 410-310-8437.

Spy House of the Week: Modernism in Neavitt

The previous house on this waterfront lot in Neavitt was a dim memory by the time the architect Mark McInturff saw the site’s potential for a weekend home for himself.  Given the Critical Area constraints, the lot was surveyed and the foundation was carefully excavated to determine the allowable buildable area. Since the allowable footprint turned out to be the size of a double-wide trailer, the architect’s design solution maximized the house’s footprint with a rectangular ground floor and three other floors layered asymmetrically above in various arrangements that also created decks at each upper level.  

The exterior’s wood shingled siding has weathered naturally to a beautiful warm gray accented by white window frames without trim. Cantilevering the front and rear walls of the house a few feet above grade from the recessed foundation gave the walls an appearance of floating in air. The stairs to the front door and from the sliding doors at the rear have deep treads to elongate the form to become another layer of the house and the railings’ combination of weathered boards and stainless steel cables accentuate their transparency.

Given the house’s three stories and roof top deck for the swimming pool, the weight of the structure is borne by cross-braced steel frames which define the three-bay ground floor plan. The entire steel frame is exposed so the beams create coffered ceilings and each bay’s interior “wall” is another “X” frame.  One bay contains the main seating area with a fireplace and millwork; the middle bay is the dining area and the other end bay is another sitting area next to the kitchen at the front of the house. The service functions (laundry, stairs) are located at the front of the house. I especially liked how the “X” bracing segments crossed over the solid end walls’ center porthole windows to become a layer of muntins over the glass. Each bay of the entire rear wall is elegantly detailed with full height picture windows flanked by single sliding doors with horizontal rails so the entire space becomes a porch. One sliding door leads to the deck and steps to the rear lawn.

Stacking the two bedrooms creates total privacy and makes each suite an individual penthouse. The master suite on the second floor has a spacious sleeping area with its picture window and sliding doors to access the deck that surrounds the entire floor for panoramic water views, broken only by the stairwell. The luxurious bath includes an oversized shower.

The third floor guest suite has its picture window flanked by sliding doors with horizontal rails at the water side.  The rear wall of the third floor sleeping area extends over the deck below to create a covered outdoor space for the second floor bedroom. The stair landing at the third  level also leads to a side deck with stairs up to the rooftop pool and its deck. How could one resist a moonlight swim or early morning lap before breakfast, high above the rooftops of the adjacent houses?

The rear yard is a true outdoor room with its tall walls of green hedges and trees that frame the water view. Chairs and tables set onto the lawn provide front row seats for relaxing and contemplating the sunset after a day on the water. At dusk when the rooms are illuminated from within the stacked composition of light and structure is breathtaking.

The deceptively simple floor plan was in reality very carefully thought out to maximize every square inch of space, and meticulously detailed, not unlike boat design. The white interiors that reflect the light, the decks on the upper floors and the crisp detailing of this remarkable house by a Modernist Master is simply stunning.

Architecture by McInturff Architects, 301-229-3705,  www.mcinturffarchitects.com. Design Team:  Mark McInturff FAIA and Christopher Boyd.  Photography by Julia Heine

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

From Moth to Monster

A few weeks ago you were sitting back admiring your freshly planted garden. Neat little rows of tomato, pepper, squash, and cucumber plants accompanied by flowers and herbs were all planted in view from your back deck. As you sat there basking in the evening sun, relishing in your hard work, a little moth fluttered from flower to flower sipping nectar.  With her hummingbird like flutters, the Carolina Sphinx moth floated through your garden, unassumingly laying her eggs on your newly planted tomato and pepper plants. Within a few days, from her little green eggs emerged a tiny but very hungry green caterpillar. Since that day, the ravenous little green Tobacco Hornworm caterpillar has spent his days munching away, perfectly hidden by the copious green foliage of your tomato plants, growing bigger and bigger. You begin to notice stems of complete defoliation. Maybe you think it’s a bunny or deer having a nighttime nibble as the little green caterpillar stays camouflaged, until the moment you notice the red-tipped horn and the very large green body of a caterpillar measuring almost 4” in length hanging on your prize winning tomato plant. During the last month the hornworm caterpillar has gone through 4-5 instars (growth stages) while feasting in your garden. If the hornworm reaches the final growth stage he will begin to wander looking for the perfect site to pupate. Once the perfect site has been found the caterpillar will form a pupal cell below the leaf litter or soil.

Hornworm parasitized by Braconoid wasps. Photo taken by Rachel Rhodes.

However, in our area there are many natural predators that love to make a meal of the delicious protein rich hornworm caterpillar or eggs. Birds, small animals, and insects find the hornworm caterpillar particularly delicious. Paper wasps use the caterpillars as a future food source in nest cells containing the wasp’s eggs. In sci-fi movie fashion, parasitic wasps (Braconid wasps), also use hornworms as a food source for their young, but in a much more diabolical manner. The small parasitic wasp inconspicuously stings the caterpillar depositing her eggs inside the hornworms body. As the larval wasps develop they devour the caterpillar, feeding on its blood as they grow. In the final pupal stage, the immature wasp spin small white cocoons that resemble grains of rice that protrude from the body of the living hornworm. Eventually, the parasitized hornworm will fall victim to the wasp and will stop eating and die. Using nature as your method of control is perhaps the best way to rid your garden of this very hungry caterpillar, so just sit back and watch the show.

For further information, please visit https://extension.umd.edu/queen-annes-county/master-gardener-home-gardening or see us on Facebook @ https://www.facebook.com/QueenAnnesCountyMasterGardeners. For more information contact: Rachel J. Rhodes, Master Gardener Coordinator at (410) 758-0166 or by email at rjrhodes@umd.edu.

University of Maryland Extension programs are open to all people and will not discriminate against anyone because of race, age, sex, color, sexual orientation, physical or mental disability, religion, ancestry, or national origin, marital status, genetic information, or political affiliation, or gender identity and expression.

Resources:
Horning in on your tomatoes-Tomato and Tobacco Hornworms: https://bugoftheweek.com/blog/2013/1/9/horning-in-on-your-tomatoes-tomato-and-tobacco-hornworms-imanduca-quinquemaculatai-and-imanduca-sextai?rq=tobacco%20Hornworm

Tobacco-Tomato Hornworm:
https://extension.umd.edu/hgic/topics/tobacco-tomato-hornworm-vegetables

Featured Creatures: University of Florida http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/field/tobacco_hornworm.htm

House of the Week: Board & Batten on Bailey’s Neck 

I love the texture of board and batten siding and how sunlight casts shadows over the walls so this traditional story and a half house’s exterior elevations caught my eye. The proportions and massing of the front elevation is very pleasing with the main pitched roof extending over the three-bay porch,  the garage wing with its gable projection and the brick faced pitched roof wing of the living room on the opposite side in contrast to the white board and batten walls. The rear of the house opens up with a shed dormer over the center wing for the second floor bedrooms and a gable over the sunroom adds further interest. The house sits in the middle of two beautifully landscaped acres adjacent to the golf course.

I rarely write about houses whose furnishings have been removed since I love interior design but this house gave me an opportunity to study the interior architecture. The front door opens into a spacious entrance hall with a side “L” shaped stair that connects to the handrail at the second floor hall.  Vistas through to the dining room windows and to the living room maintains the feeling of openness. The large living room with a fireplace leads to the sunroom overlooking the rear lawn and landscaping. The house flows very well from the sunroom to the dining room, kitchen, breakfast room and family room and the large terrace at the rear is easily accessible  for relaxing with family and friends. A side entry door next to the garage leads to the mud room and laundry. The remainder of the main floor is the master suite, accessed from a short hall off the entrance hall.  

The second floor is larger than it looks from the exterior with three  bedrooms and a smaller fourth one that could become a home office or studio. I liked the sloped areas along the perimeter of the ceilings and the hardwood floors of the second floor rooms. One thing I would do if this house were mine would be to open up the wall between the breakfast room and the family room. Small change to a space plan that has great bones!

For more information about this property, contact Barb Watkins with Benson and Mangold at 410-822-1415 (o), 410-310-2021 (c), or barb.c.watkins@gmail.com,  “Equal Housing Opportunity.”

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Spy House of the Week: Cooke’s Hope Cottage

Last week I attended a board meeting at a member’s house in Cooke’s Hope and once again I was charmed by the layout of the neighborhood. The entry drive past the bucolic pastures, the non-grid streets lined with sidewalks under mature trees, distinctive architectural styles and walking trails are a few of the amenities that give this well-established neighborhood great appeal.

I drove past this house and the massing, offsets and architectural details of this cottage style house caught my eye. The entry wing has a triangular dormer with a half-moon accent window centered over the entry door below and the main roof breaks to become a shed roof that covers the five bay full front porch with its articulated columns and handrail. The kitchen is offset just enough to provide a side window for the front sitting room for additional sunlight. The wide bay window at the side elevation is the focal point of the kitchen within.  The final offset of the garage wing provides a side window for the dining room as well as access from the rear yard and patio to the mud room/laundry.

The floor plan works very well with the entire right side of the house devoted to a spacious master suite including an office at the front of the house overlooking the porch.  Another sitting room is across the office from the entrance hall. At the middle of the house is the living room, dining room and family room. Even though it is an interior room, the living room feels spacious since the stairway has an open handrail, the room’s high ceiling is open to the second floor and the cross vista through the adjacent family room ends in windows. The living room seating is grouped around the fireplace with millwork for books and collectibles. I liked how the back wall of the millwork was painted a deep red, all the better to highlight the colorful ceramics. The dining room is connected to the living room with a wide doorway and the antique furnishings, chandelier and faux-finish walls with a white wainscot below creates a gracious space for making any dinner an occasion.

The spacious family room at the rear of the house has triple pairs of sliding doors to the patio and views to the beautifully landscaped areas around the perimeter of the property. The large room has several seating areas for relaxing or watching TV.  I loved the kitchen with its hutch styled cabinetry on one side with a backdrop of deep green to accentuate the fine china and crystal, the wide bay window instead of upper cabinets and the contrasting dark wood island and wood floor.

The master bedroom at the rear of the house has windows on two walls for daylight throughout the day. The pale yellow walls, drapery and valance, wood furnishings, the delicate floral pattern of the curved padded headboard and bedskirt with the white bed linens creates a serene retreat. The second floor bedrooms are separated by the upper volume of the living room for privacy and share a small sitting area open to the stairs and the living room below.

Cooke’s Hope is one of the most popular neighborhoods along the sought after Easton-Oxford corridor and this traditionally styled house would be a great place to call home.

 

For more information about this property contact Janet Larson with Benson and Mangold at 410-822-6665 (o), 410-310-1797 (c) or jlarson@bensonandmangold.com, Equal Housing Opportunity”.

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Habitat: The Work of Architect William Draper Brinckloe

I have a particular fondness for the “Period” style of American architecture from the early twentieth century. Partly as a reaction to the previous elaborate Victorian style, these Period homes were compact, with space plans defined by separate rooms according to function. Designs were inspired by English Tudor, Colonial Revival, French Colonial, Spanish Colonial, Bungalow and Craftsman styles. Two of my favorite Period houses in Easton’s Historic District are a bungalow on Washington Street and a Dutch colonial on S. Harrison Street.  After some research, I discovered they were designed by the same architect, William Draper Brinckloe, who lived to Easton from 1911 until his death in 1933. He was also an author of two books, “The Small Home” and “The Volunteer Firemen”. In his book “The Small Home” he mentions that he is designing a small bungalow for his family which became known as the “Dutch Cottage” on Harrison Street.

“A Small Home” is out of print but through the Easton Library’s loan program, I obtained a copy that was invaluable to me in my research. Brinckloe discusses sixteen categories of planning and building a house and includes plans and perspectives of sixty of his charming designs. I chuckled when I saw rooms on several plans named “sewing room” as my sewing skills are limited to sewing buttons or fixing hems!  As a veteran of many home makeovers, his chapter on “Making Over the Old Home” had a simple rule “Do as little tearing out as possible; remodel by building on new work, rather than by changing old” and my architectural practice has endeavored to adhere to that rule. I then wryly read his comment that he “…specialized on remodeling to some extent; and I have probably done more of it than my brother architects”. Little did he know that today all but one of Easton’s architectural firms have women principals.

åBrinckloe also designed several commercial projects, including renovations to the landmark Stewart Building that the Prager Group has updated to become the Jewel in the Crown of Federal Street. Brinckloe’s design for the brick building near the corner of Dover and Aurora Streets is simply delightful.  Red brick with accents of white banding between the lower floor windows and the arched transoms, the recessed archway that is an open vestibule to the French entry door beyond, three single windows that step up in tune to the stairway and two pairs of four window units create a lively façade. I especially liked how the white lintel band created a small open transom for the vestibule beyond. The wall above the stairwell rises above the parapet and is crowned with an arched top that steps down to the adjacent roof.  The second floor windows are covered by a deep shingled roof overhang and enhanced by window boxes below.

In addition to Brinckloe’s designs for the Washington and Harrison Street residences, Aurora Street has a row of his Period designs across from Idlewild Park.  When I was active in real estate, I showed the irresistible red brick bungalow with a tile roof. The roofline flares at the front elevation and a wide shed dormer creates space for a second floor.  I loved the symmetry of the front elevation with two pairs of shed roof dormer windows that were centered over the front door below and the end windows that were centered over the wide bay windows below that are tucked under the wide soffit.  The exquisite one-story semicircular bay wing on the right of the house is surrounded by continuous windows for sunlight and views of the park.`

The other Aurora Street bungalows are equally charming with their brick facades and the variety of roof styles that create a delightful streetscape. One house has a hipped roof with two dormer windows and a front porch gable flanked by two pairs of windows.  The center and each end of the elliptical window headers are accented in white to match the façade’s white quoins. Another house has lighter brick with white quoins and two shed dormers in its tile roof. The third house has a gambrel roof, double window dormers above an asymmetrical façade of a triple window bay with quoins, front door and double window. The fourth house is a lovely elongated façade of light brick with white quoins, the entry porch at one side, a wide shed dormer that meets the front wall of the main floor below and a single window wing at the end.

I was very fortunate to have tours of both the Washington Street bungalow and the Harrison Street “Dutch Cottage” that Brinckloe once called home. The Washington Street bungalow is the last illustration of his book. Brinckloe wrote that “the living room is particularly attractive with its curved ingle-nook bordered by bookshelves” and it has remained so. I absolutely love the front elevation with its gable front, deep eave broken by an “eyebrow” to mark the front door, the deep wrap-around porch with its wide, flared columns, the hipped roof wing next to the gable with a triple window-a perfect example of proportion and style that has been lovingly maintained by its current owners.  

Brinckloe’s “Dutch Cottage” residence is set back and angled from the street for privacy. A weathered wood fence along the street frontage is broken by a curved brick path that leads to a gate in the fence. After a short walk through the landscape you cross over a bridge where a stream once bisected the property. You arrive at the two-story gambrel roofed cottage that is sited parallel to the dry stream bed for maximum privacy from the street. The exterior walls are painted dark gray that disappear into the landscape and the crisp white multipaned windows, trim and pale brown shutters are appealing accents.  The front door opens to a view of the stairs that split at the landing in two directions. The dining room has a fireplace with a surround of Delft tiles and an arched niche above for family photographs. One bedroom is tucked under the eaves with a triple window dormer for sunlight.

Brinckloe’s home will be featured in the first Fall Spy House Tour of Homes on Sunday October 6th.  Homes will be designed by architects and interior designers  in a celebration of Talbot County’s great architectural heritage, past and present. Stay tuned to the Spy for more information.

Many thanks to the owners of the Washington Street and S. Harrison Street residences who graciously welcomed me into their homes and shared their photographs.

I am indebted to my friend, the artist Carol Minarick, for leading me to the work of this gifted architect of an earlier generation.  I am also grateful to the architect Charles Goebel for his help during my research.

Exterior Photography by Ted Mueller, tedmuellerphotography@gmail.com, 443-955-2490

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

House of the Week: Winsome Winton

I know this house well as I had it under contract when I moved from Pittsburgh in 2004. Unfortunately, the buyer for my Pittsburgh house was not able to obtain financing so I had to reluctantly withdraw my offer for this charming bungalow. Even after fifteen years, all the features that first attracted me to the property are even better. The corner lot’s landscaping has grown taller and broadened out to provide privacy for the side yard and the front porch that is partially screened.  All the Craftsman style details were unaltered-the wide shed dormer at the front elevation, the arrangement of rooms, the narrow French doors on either side of the fireplace, the wood stair balustrade, the beautiful wood floors, trim and period doors. In 2004, I had a sheltie and the rear fenced yard would have been the perfect spot for her to enjoy being outdoors under plenty of shade from the mature trees while I gardened. The French door from the deck would have provided quick access for that last walk before bedtime.

The main floor plan is typical of early 20th century bungalows. The front door opens onto the living room that spans the full length of the house with the stair to the second floor at one side for flexible furniture arrangement.  Behind the living room what was probably the original dining room is currently used as a TV room next to the kitchen. Stairs from the kitchen lead to the deck at the rear yard and then to the basement. Behind the dining room and the kitchen is the original sunroom that is currently a roomy office and a powder room. Narrow half-French doors on either side of the brick fireplace lead to the screened portion of the wrap-around porch. The stair leads to a center hall on the second floor with a large bath and two bedrooms.  The rear bedroom connects to a room that could become a dressing room or office.

Two of the five houses I have called home so far have been bungalows; I simply can’t resist their quirky charm. This bungalow on its corner lot, landscaping for privacy, rear yard with terrace under mature trees and plantings, porches and great floor plan is irresistible too-someone else agrees for this bungalow is under contract. Once again, I missed my chance!

For more information about this property, contact Meg Moran, GRI, with Long and Foster Real Estate-Christies International Real Estate at 410-770-3600 (o), 410-310-2209 (c), or megmoran007@gmail.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity”.

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

×
×
We're glad you're enjoying The Talbot Spy.

Sign up for the the free email blast to see what's new in the Spy. It's delivered right to your inbox at 3PM sharp.

Sign up here.