Adkins Arboretum Announces Spring Open House, Native Plant Sale

Adkins Arboretum, offering the Chesapeake gardener the largest selection of native plants for more than 20 years, announces its Spring Open House & Native Plant Sale weekend, April 26–28. The sale benefits the Arboretum’s education programs and affords the public an opportunity to learn about the Delmarva’s native plants and their connection to a healthy Chesapeake Bay.

Plants for sale include a large variety of native perennials, ferns, vines, grasses and flowering trees and shrubs for spring planting. Native flowers and trees provide food and habitat for wildlife and make colorful additions to home landscapes, whether in a perennial border, a woodland garden or a restoration project. Native honeysuckle entices hummingbirds, while tall spikes of purplish flowers grace blue wild indigo. Milkweed provides critical energy for Monarch butterflies on their winter migration to Mexico, and native azaleas present a veritable rainbow of colorful blooms.

Open House and plant sale hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Fri., April 26 and Sat., April 27, and noon to 4 p.m. on Sun., April 28. Presale orders may be placed at adkinsarboretum.org through April 4. Simply place your order, and your plants will be ready for pick-up during the Open House weekend. Following the Open House, plants will be for sale at the Visitor’s Center throughout the growing season.

The Arboretum gift shop will be open during the Open House weekend and will offer books and nature-inspired gifts for gardeners. Members, including those who join during the Open House, receive a 10% discount on plant, gift shop and book purchases. Members at the Contributor ($100) level and above receive a 20% discount on plants.

For more information, call 410-634-2847, extension 0 or visit adkinsarboretum.org.

Adkins Arboretum is a 400-acre native garden and preserve at the headwaters of the Tuckahoe Creek in Caroline County. Open year round, the Arboretum offers educational programs for all ages about nature and gardening. For more information, visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

House of the Week: Royal Oak Perfection

There are probably not enough superlatives in Webster’s dictionary to describe this spectacular site, house and interiors for how many synonyms are there for “perfection”?  As I approached the house along the entry drive flanked by trees, I noted the linear footprint of the house and how part of the length is angled to embrace this waterfront site. The rear elevation shows how the two-story wings are separated by links that cleverly breaks down the massing to one-story wings at each end of the house. The Owner graciously gave me a tour and I learned the main wing was built in 1990 and the subsequent addition of the guest wing/garage followed in 2007.

The floor plan is zoned very well with the main wing containing the entrance hall, kitchen, family room, den and gallery with a breakfast area. The family room with its stone fireplace has a rear wall with a wide elliptical arched opening that connects it to the gallery and water views beyond. The brick-floored gallery is a wonderful space with its row of French doors and elliptical transoms for panoramic views of the water. There is both a seating area and a bay window with a window seat and chairs around a table for casual dining.

The story and a half-wing with the  butler’s pantry, potting room, short hall and screened porch leads to the living room beyond. The soaring two-story ceiling, sunlight from the front and rear windows, dormer windows, deep auburgine walls and full height stone fireplace and chimney gives the living room great interior architecture. On the other side of the living room, another short hall with doors at the front and back leads to the guest suite behind the garage with a sitting room and kitchen. Two bedrooms and two baths are located upstairs.

At the opposite end of the house, the geometry of the stunning solarium with its chamfered rear corners, glass walls and glass roof connects to the gallery and to the master bedroom suite. The master bedroom has a high pitched ceiling and views to the water through the wide rear wall opening to the solarium. Above the center wing of the house are three additional bedrooms, two baths and a third room used as an office. The office has its own stair that leads to the living room below and French doors give access to the deck along the rear of the house for the office and the rear bedrooms.

After walking through the house to understand the floor plan and the flow, I returned to each room to savor the exquisite interior design. I later learned from the listing agent who accompanied me that the interiors were the result of the Owner’s innate sense of design and style. The solarium was clearly my favorite room due to its geometry, transparency and orientation for breathtaking sunsets.

I also loved the charm of the smaller service spaces. The dressing room of the master suite with its blue walls of alternating dark and light vertical stripes, the white dressing table and soft patterned window valances is a serene space to start and end the day. The butler’s pantry could service any size party and the charming potting shed would entice anyone to become a Master Gardener.

The chef’s kitchen has a painted black and white checkerboard floor and warm wood cabinets that contrasted with the lighter wood of the island.  The mirror above the sink above the side wall was a clever way to add perspective to an interior wall and the mirror reflects the decorative tile over the range on the opposite wall.

One of the second floor bedrooms was a serene space with its small scaled patterned wallpaper, window treatments and bed linens. The  master suite’s blue and white color scheme, white bed linens and floral upholstered pieces was a restful retreat.

As I left this exquisite house, I took a final look back at the solarium to make sure Ms. Scarlett wasn’t waiting there with the revolver tucked into her clutch purse….

 

For more information about this property, contact Laura Carney with Benson and Mangold Real Estate at 410-745-0415 (o), 410-310-3307 (c) or laurahcarney@gmail.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity”. Photography by Jim McKee of BroadView Concepts

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

 

Spy House of the Week: “Pretty in Pink”

There are so many architectural styles that I admire but it is always difficult for me to resist the Queen Anne American style for its sheer exuberance. The elements of this style are all here in this house- the asymmetry, dominant front two-story gable projection, side secondary two-story gable projection, square tower with its hipped roof, wrap-around porch with articulated columns and fretwork, eave brackets, lap siding with fish-scale siding on the third floor, bay windows, accent attic windows, stained glass and diamond patterned muntins-this “Pink Lady” stands tall and is dressed in her Sunday best!

The front door opens onto a deep two-story entrance hall with beautiful herringbone patterned wood flooring. The triple run “U” shaped staircase with stained carved newel posts and railing cap with white balusters wraps around the side and rear wall. The side double window and arched transom with top and bottom diamond patterned muntins infilled with stained glass filters light within. The rear double window at the landing with full diamond patterned muntins and clear glass brings in direct sunlight.

The bay-windowed rooms on the first floor are parlors whose interiors designate their different functions. The front parlor has a seating grouping around the fireplace and a Queen Anne style writing desk at the bay window. The rear parlor with its paneled wainscot has a seating grouping around the TV and leads to the “U” shaped kitchen with a peninsula bar. The kitchen is open to the dining area with its trio of double windows along the side and another double window at the rear for views to the back yard. The glassed-in porch off the dining area has direct access to the rear terrace with seating and dining areas. The high fence between the house and the storage shed gives seated privacy for enjoying meals outdoors.

I loved how the stair landings were enlarged to create seating areas under the decorative windows. At the second floor a wide window with narrower sidelights and diamond muntins on the top light and a picture window below would be a cozy space for reading to a child or grandchild before bedtime or a sitting area for the bedrooms to share. The third floor landing at the top of the stair tower has a beautifully detailed window trio with an arched top center unit infilled with diamond muntin segments over a picture pane below. Shorter sidelights with full diamond muntins complete the design and the sofa below would be a quiet spot for an afternoon nap.

Two of the bedrooms on the second floor have one bay-windowed wall for great interior architecture and the third floor with its pitched ceiling that follows the gable roof above and dormer windows is a great space for myriad uses limited only by one’s imagination. This “Pink Lady” has irresistible appeal with its distinctive architecture and numerous period details inside and outside.  It is updated and ready for a new owner to fully appreciate this gem.

   

For more information about this property, contact Retha Arbital with Doug Ashley Realtors at 410-810-0010 (o), 410-708-2172 (c) or rarrabal@hotmail.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity”.

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Ruth Rogers Clausen to Speak About Delaware Botanic Gardens

On Friday, March 22, Ruth Rogers Clausen will give a talk titled “Delaware Botanic Gardens: From a Humble Beginning to an Amazing Reality”. The Delaware Botanic Gardens at Pepper Creek located in Dagsboro, DE is still a work in progress; it will open its doors to the public in September 2019. The mission of the Gardens is to create an inspirational, educational, and sustainable public garden in Delaware for the benefit and enjoyment of all.  The Delaware Botanic Gardens will celebrate the coastal plain with a sustainable garden located on 37 acres. It includes a 25-acre flat uplands plateau highlighted by an innovative meadow designed by Piet Oudolf, a 12.5-acre sloped woodlands with freshwater wetlands, and 1,000 feet of waterfront with tidal wetlands on Pepper Creek. The goal is to inspire visitors to preserve Delmarva’s native landscape.

Ruth Rogers Clausen was trained in horticulture in the UK and has now been in the industry for more than 60 years. She has written several gardening books and lectures widely. Some of Ruth’s books include Perennials for American Gardens (1989), Dreamscaping (2003), 50 Beautiful Deer-Resistant Plants (2011) and Essential Perennials (2015). Ruth was the Horticulture Editor for Country Living Gardener for more than 7 years. Currently she writes the “Plantings” column for Country Gardens magazine.  In 2017 she received the Garden Media Award from the Perennial Plant Association. She is a member of the Corporation for the New York Botanical Garden and is on the Board of Directors for Delaware Botanic Gardens @ Pepper Creek in southern Delaware.

This talk is part of the 20th Annual Kent Horticulture Lecture Series organized by the University of Maryland Extension in Kent County. The program will be held at 10:00am at the Kent County Public Library, 408 High Street, Chestertown, MD 21620. This event is free of charge. For more information, please contact Sabine Harvey, 410-778-1661 or sharvey1@umd.edu

The University of Maryland, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources programs are open to all and will not discriminate against anyone because of race, age, sex, color, sexual orientation, physical or mental disability, religion, ancestry, or national origin, marital status, genetic information, or political affiliation, or gender identity and expression.

Spy House of the Week: Little Giddings – At Home with Joan Wetmore

Today as a new feature of Habitat, I will begin to celebrate excellence in interior design, whether the work was done by professionals or owners with innate design talent. Recently I attended a luncheon at Joan Wetmore’s house in Neavitt, As my friends and I arrived, I remarked how charming her shingle style two-story house with a front wrap-around porch was.  After opening the front door, it was clear the interiors were even more charming. As I walked through the beautifully decorated rooms, I noted how well the scale of the furnishings complemented the size of each room. I also appreciated how the floor plan had not been “modernized” to create the ubiquitous “open concept”. Instead, the rooms maintained their original dimensions with very little alteration. I also learned of Joan’s lifelong interest in antiques and many beautiful pieces that her discriminating eye selected graced each room.

Since this was my first visit to Joan’s home, she gave me a tour and explained the changes she had made to the original house. She extended the HVAC closet next to the stairs that had the dual effect of creating an entry alcove and a short hall leading to the bathroom. The half glass door, sidelights and transom added light to the entry and a wooden rack on the side wall held her collection of hats. Next to the HVAC closet, new millwork displayed her art, books, collectibles and family photographs. The wall opening between the sitting and dining rooms was widened to create a vista to the rear wall of the house.

I coveted the two distinctive spindle chairs with high backs and fretwork sides in front of the porch windows of the main sitting room.  The loveseat with side arms that curved slightly inward was carefully chosen to fit between the two front windows. The neutral colors and placement of the furnishings made the space seem larger than it was and the accents of the patterned rug, the Oriental style tray that became the coffee table top, artwork and simple window treatments gave this room a sophisticated look.

The dining room was at the center of the house and had views to the rear yard and all the main floor rooms. The beautiful antique table anchored by an Oriental rug was centered in the room opposite an antique Grandfather’s clock and an antique chest that gave warmth to the space. The delightful sun room with triple side windows and rear double windows was Joan’s office.  Since it has a closet, she is considering replacing the deck chair with a chair/bed for her grandchildren’s visits.

My favorite room was the kitchen at the rear of the house. The pitched ceiling with two exposed collar beams and windows on three sides for daylight created great interior architecture.  Along one side wall cream colored cabinets with glass-fronted upper doors held Joan’s collection of ceramics and glassware. Antique pieces including a distinctive armoire with upper glass fronts, another chest and a small piece between the doorway to the dining room and the pantry/laundry that held more serving pieces. In the center of the room was an antique table with Queen Anne chairs for dining for views through the rear double windows to the deep rear yard.

One of the two upstairs bedrooms spanned across the front of the house and had windows on two sides. This serene bedroom  with its light aqua walls, wood bed frame with low headboard and footboards, white quilted coverlet, striped bedskirt and patterned shams created a restful retreat.  Two small wooden tables with lamps served as nightstands. The rear bedroom walls were painted in butter yellow which was a backdrop for a vertical row of china plates and artful arrangements of art and memorabilia. A set of nesting tables served as one nightstand and on the other side of the bed was an antique washstand.  An antique trunk at the foot of the bed held stacks of art books and design magazines.

As I left Joan’s house, I reflected upon her innate design talent and exquisite taste that produced such wonderful interiors and gave the house its distinctive personality. Brava!

 

Joan Wetmore is a realtor with Meredith Fine Properties and provides staging assistance to her customers. Contact Joan at 410-924-2432 (c) or JoanWetmore@msn.com.

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Mid-Shore Gardens: Protecting Trees from Vines with Lisa Ghezzi

Spring is almost upon us and with it comes a burst of green. For those who yearn for this time of year, the sea of green that unfolds around us can be almost intoxicating. However, not all green is good, and the University of Maryland Master Gardeners have recently turned their attention towards understanding the impact of invasive plant species on local environments.

This winter, Master Gardener Lisa Ghezzi formed an invasive plant committee under the University of Maryland Extension Office to tackle invasive plant problems in Talbot County. The group met over the winter to review the kinds of invasive plant species in our area, the best ways to control or eradicate the invasive species, ways educate the public on invasive plants and to choose a sight to demonstrate invasive removal.

An area on Bay Street has been selected for many reasons. Often referred to as the “Bay Street Ponds,” the site chosen was teeming with invasive plants. When the committee previewed the sight in mid-February, the negative impact of invasive plants was obvious; 8 invasive plant species were identified for removal. Vines choked the trees and shrubbery, and one very observant committee member commented that they didn’t witness or hear a single songbird at this sight; it was a little too quiet. This property, owned by Waterfowl Chesapeake provides the perfect opportunity for the Master Gardeners to showcase the benefits of invasive removal in an area with easy public access. Improving the sight not only benefits Waterfowl Chesapeake and the Town of Easton, but at heart, our planet.  

So, what are invasive plants? Invasive plants are alien species that do not normally grow in our region. Not all non-native plants are necessarily bad. Some non-natives can coexist and cause little environmental damage such as hosta or weeping willow. However, some non-native plants thrive a little too much, out competing natives species, while providing no nutritional value for wildlife like butterflies, bees and songbirds. When an invasive plant species takes over an area, native plants die and the habitat becomes altered. Over time, these stricken areas provide less resources for our native wildlife so birds, bees and butterflies look elsewhere to thrive. While pollinator and songbird populations are in precipitous decline, invasive plant species are proliferating unchecked and are destroying the biodiversity our landscape needs.

Invasive species identified in this particular area include: white mulberry, japanese honeysuckle, amur honeysuckle, english ivy, privet, porcelain berry, multiflora rose, and sweet autumn clematis. Many of these plants were introduced to our landscape in the 1800’s or even earlier. For example, the White Mulberry Tree, native to China, was introduced in the U.S. during colonial times for the purpose of establishing a silkworm industry. It is outcompeting and replacing our native red mulberry through hybridization and possibly through transmission of a harmful root disease. English Ivy was introduced by European Colonists in 1727. It is a very aggressive vine that can choke trees and block sunlight to its foliage, ultimately killing a tree over the course of several years. English Ivy harbors bacterial leaf scorch, a harmful plant pathogen that affects a wide variety of native trees such as elms, oaks and maples. (Plant Invaders of the Mid-Atlantic Natural Areas, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

In addition to eradication of the invasive plants at this site, the Master Gardeners have identified several native species they will enhance such as red bud trees, a native holly, several eastern red cedar trees and a box elder tree, among others.  Box elder is a member of the maple family and provides food for a beautiful yellow bird in the finch family called the evening grosbeak . The box elder is currently being smothered by amur honeysuckle. Eastern red cedar tree berries are consumed by over 50 species of birds. They are currently being strangled by porcelain berry.

To learn more about invasive plants and this upcoming project, please join the Master Gardeners for an informational walk and talk on Saturday March 9th at 9am at the Bay Street Ponds. If you are interested in assisting the Master Gardeners with this project our work day is on Wednesday March 13th at the Bay Street Ponds (Rain date is March 15th). There will be two informational/work sessions. One from 8 A.M. to 11A.M. and another from 12P.M. to 3P.M. Each session will start with a short talk about invasive plants, how to identify them, and a demonstration of the best tools to use. Complimentary drinks and snacks for all participants will be provided throughout the day.

Recommended attire is long pants, long sleeves, mud boots and gloves. The Master Gardeners and volunteers will not be applying any herbicides. However, due to the virility of some of these plants, a limited use of direct application cut stump treatment will be administered by a single certified herbicide specialist. This will occur after all hand work has been completed.  

If you cannot join us, there are still ways you can help. When planting this spring, consider native plants. Native plants have a tremendously positive ecological impact, they are already adapted to the area, and they provide much needed beneficial habitat and food for native wildlife.  They are also very attractive, which makes native plants both beautiful and functional. When observing native gardens, they look like they belong in the Talbot County landscape, and they do! There are several local nurseries that stock a wide variety of native plants to choose from.

Sponsors of this Habitat Restoration Project include: University of Maryland Extension, Shore Rivers, Waterfowl Chesapeake, and Garden and Garnish Caterers.  Members of the Invasive Plant Committee include: Lisa Ghezzi (chair), Carol Jelich, Joe Jelich, Rita Miley, Renee Rice and Cathy Schmidt. For more information and to let us know you will be attending, please contact Lisa Ghezzi at (703) 328-6322.

Ways You Can Help:

Don’t introduce invasive plants

  • Don’t plant them
  • Don’t share them with others
  • Don’t accidentally transport them. Remove seeds from muddy shoes, burrs stuck on clothes. Avoid mixing their root pieces or seeds in soil with other plants
  • Avoid disturbing soils unnecessarily; invasives are quick to colonize.  Quickly replant vacant soils

Encourage native plants

  • Increase use of natives in home landscapes to order to increases the native seed and gene pool
  • Set aside some untouched natural areas to preserve native genotypes
  • Support deer control where deer over-population is decimating native plants
  • Replace invasive plants with a native plant or, at least, a non-invasive plant

Educate yourself and others

  • Encourage local nurseries to stock native plants, particularly local genotypes, and buy them
  • Bring nurseries’ attention to invasive stock and invasive weeds hitchhiking on stock
  • Share the news about invasive plants to friends, neighbors and family

Remove invasive plants

  • Familiarize yourself with invasive species in local parks and natural areas
  • Report sightings of invasive plants in parks to the managing agency
  • Support community efforts to clear invasive plants and restore native plants

 

Kate Livie to Speak About “Splendor in the Grass” March 15

On Friday, March 15, Kate Livie will give a talk titled “Splendor in the Grass: the Chesapeake Bay’s Native Aquatic Grasses”.

Kate Livie is a professional Chesapeake educator, writer and historian. An Eastern Shore native, Livie is passionate about the Chesapeake Bay’s culture and landscape. Livie has written extensively about the regional travel, history and foodways for publications from Wooden Boat to Baltimore Magazine to the Bay Journal. Her 2015 book, Chesapeake Oysters: The Bay’s Foundation and Future, won the Maryland Historical Society’s Marion Brewington prize for Maritime History.

Formerly the director of education and associate curator at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum, Livie is currently the head creative and founder of Alosa Communications. Livie is also adjunct faculty at Chestertown’s Washington College, where she teaches courses about the Bay’s environment, economy and culture with the Center for Environment and Society.

This talk is part of the 20th Annual Kent Horticulture Lecture Series. The program will be held at 10:00am at the Kent County Public Library, 408 High Street, Chestertown, MD 21620. This event is free of charge. For more information, please contact Sabine Harvey, 410-778-1661 or sharvey1@umd.edu

The University of Maryland, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources programs are open to all and will not discriminate against anyone because of race, age, sex, color, sexual orientation, physical or mental disability, religion, ancestry, or national origin, marital status, genetic information, or political affiliation, or gender identity and expression.

Centreville Farmers’ Market Recruiting Farmers/Producers for 2019 Market Season

With the first day of spring less than three weeks away, it’s time to think about warmer days and supporting local farmers and producers at your local farmers’ market. The Centreville Farmers’ Market is accepting inquiries from Maryland farmers/producers for the 2019 farmers’ market season.

The market will be returning to the Centreville Plaza, 611 – 631 Railroad Ave. next to Queen Anne’s County High School. This location has served as the market’s home away from home during the town’s infrastructure project. Hosted by Centreville Plaza in partnership with Acme Markets, the Centreville Farmers’ Market will open Wednesday, May 1 from 2 to 6 p.m. and will continue through Wednesday, October 23.

Vendor openings include farmers/producers for vegetables, fruits, organic vegetables and fruits, artisan breads, cheese, mushrooms, gluten-free baked goods and specialty items. The market will host a farmer/producer vendor event on Wednesday, March 20, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. to sign up vendors and address questions and inquiries. The ​event is free and open to farmers and producers who are interested in selling at the market this year. RSVP by Monday, March 18 by calling (410) 758-1180, ext. 17 or emailing mainstreet@townofcentreville.org.

These lovely sunflowers were grown at Sand Hill Farm in Greensboro, one of the farmers who sell at the Centreville Farmers’ Market.

Seasonal P/T market manager and internship

In addition to new vendors, the market is seeking a seasonal part-time market manager to nurture and grow the market. The ideal candidate would be passionate about farmers’ markets and locally sourced fresh food and have a working knowledge of farmers markets or sales of fresh food items. Tasks include recruiting vendors, onsite management, and promoting the market.

Desirable skills include excellent communications skills, ability to work independently and as a collaborator, and strong computer, organizational and time management skills. The market will pay a cash stipend and provide a weekly shopping allowance at the market.

A summer communications internship for college communications, journalism or public relations student is also available for students interested in gaining valuable experience in event promotion, advertising and publicity.

For more information about Centreville Farmers’ Market opportunities or to RSVP to the farmer/producer event, call (410) 758-1180, ext. 17 or email mainstreet@townofcentreville.org.​

Spy House of The Week:  Le Gates Cove Charmer

The textures, massing, symmetry and accent colors of this house immediately caught my eye. The house with its center two-story wing clad in red brick below the wood shake gambrel roof and the one-story wings clad in creamy white siding nestles under the trees in this wooded setting on the Tred Avon River. The combination of the center wing’s symmetry with the two asymmetrical wings gave this house great character. The right side is a single story wing but the left side telescopes down to a wing with a triple window dormer then down again to a one-story hipped roofed room with a bright red door.

The front door opens to an entrance hall with a French door at the rear and an “L” shaped stair that evokes Maryland’s historic center-hall floor plans. Both entry doors and a window at the stair landing filter daylight inside and the apricot walls and wood floors create a warm and inviting entry. The main floor plan is linear and one room deep so as one moves through the house the water is always visible.

The entrance hall separates the living room and the dining room. The focal point of the living room is the fireplace and pairs of windows at the front and rear of the house make this a sunny space. The dining room also has pairs of windows at the front and rear and it connects to my favorite space, the kitchen and sunroom furnished as a family room with a breakfast area. The sage green walls, warm wood floors, triple windows above the front cabinets, fireplace, beautiful Craftsman styled cherry cabinets, solid surface countertop, triple windows with the sills at the top of the counter along the front cabinets and a wall of windows that wraps around the sunroom create an irresistible space.

Beyond the living room is the spacious master suite. The master bedroom’s light blue walls, the fireplace opposite the poster bed with pale blue linens, millwork with books and family memorabilia and a wide chaise create a serene retreat.  The three upstairs bedrooms are tucked under the geometry of the gambrel roof and one charming bedroom has windows at the rear and a triangular wrap-around side window that follows the roofline below. As I walked through the house with the agent, I admired the interior design and was not surprised to learn that the owner is an artist whose flair with warm wall colors, antiques, art and collectibles created a home with great personality.

The site’s outdoor rooms offer many  opportunities for relaxing and enjoying the river views.  Off the sunroom is a brick terrace with a fireplace and pizza oven for al-fresco dining.  Large stone pavers connect to another brick terrace accessed by the rear entrance hall door and a door to the master bath for quick access to the hot tub.  If a hot tub is not enough, there is room for a pool on the site. Another seating area is close to the river with a fireplace to warm cool fall evenings. The lawn slopes gently away from the rear of the house to the river to complete this picturesque setting.

 

For more information about this property, please contact Cheri Bruce-Phipps at Long & Foster Real Estate at 410-745-0283 (o), 443-994-2164 (c), or RCheri@lnf.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity.”

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

 

“Amphibians & Reptiles of the Garden/Home Landscape” Talk March 8

On Friday, March 8, Heather Cunningham will give a talk about “Amphibians & Reptiles of the Garden/ Home Landscape”. The talk is based on the recently published book The Maryland Amphibian & Reptile Atlas. The atlas was written after 5 years of observations and recordings by nearly a thousand citizen scientists. From 2010 until the end of 2014, these volunteers collected data about the frogs, salamanders, turtles, snakes and lizards that can be found in Maryland. All in all, the atlas describes the natural history of 89 species of amphibians and reptiles.

Heather Cunningham is an Associate Professor of Biology at Chesapeake College. She was the project coordinator of the Maryland Amphibian & Reptile Atlas and she is co-editor of the Atlas in which all the data from the project were gathered.

This talk is part of the 20th Annual Kent Horticulture Lecture Series. The program will be held at 10:00am at the Kent County Public Library, 408 High Street, Chestertown, MD 21620. This event is free of charge. For more information, please contact Sabine Harvey, 410-778-1661 or sharvey1@umd.edu

The University of Maryland, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources programs are open to all and will not discriminate against anyone because of race, age, sex, color, sexual orientation, physical or mental disability, religion, ancestry, or national origin, marital status, genetic information, or political affiliation, or gender identity and expression.

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