Spy House of the Week: “Snug Cove”

Like many sites on the Eastern Shore, a meandering road leads through the woods to “Snug Cove”. The front elevation of the story and a half house is a traditional architectural style with the front door flanked by tall windows with shutters and two dormers above, a smaller depth wing and a double garage. Not unlike other waterfront houses, the rear of the house is dramatically different to open up the house to Leadenham Creek. The main floor wall of windows at the dining room, the screened porch with triple windows behind it to the great room and a two-level screened deck pavilion with a hot tub all offer expansive water views. A large dormer at the second floor creates a spacious master suite complete with a deck for star-gazing.  

The great room, sunroom, kitchen and dining room with their water views are the hub of the house and the rooms flow seamlessly to create wonderful spaces to relax with family or for entertaining. I liked the dining room with its sloped ceiling, the rear wall of windows and the window and door to the adjacent screened porch for long views to the water.  The interior design with the wood table, wood sideboard, art, pendant lights and the texture of the dining chairs creates an inviting space to linger over a meal. The adjacent sunroom/screened porch and the outdoor “pavilion” would be perfect spaces to relax after a day on the water. I especially liked how the pavilion had a two-level floor so the hot tub on the lower area did not block the water views from the upper level seating area.

The spacious master suite was simply irresistible to me. The large bedroom had a gambrel shaped ceiling for interior architectural interest. The TV armoire and  fireplace are flanked by pairs of French doors that lead to a deck for “bird’s eye” views to the water. The lovely wood furnishings, a patterned rug over the beautiful wood floors and upholstered seating completed the serene look.

 

 

For more information about this property, contact Kurt Petzold with Chesapeake Bay Properties at 410-820-8008 (o) 410-310-1050 (c), or kpetzold@goeaston.net “Equal Housing Opportunity”.

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

4-H January Events

Volunteers needed in 4-H:  Looking for volunteers as Kent County Fair 4-H Division chairpersons, judges and much more!  Call the Extension Office if interested, 410-778-1661.  The University of Maryland, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources programs are open to all and will not discriminate against anyone because of race, age, sex, color, sexual orientation, physical or mental disability, religion, ancestry, or national origin, marital status, genetic information, or political affiliation, or gender identity and expression.

January 2019

Mon. 1/7 – 4-H Nature Afterschool Club, 4-5 pm, Kent Co. Library.
Tues. 1/8 – Puppy Pals Club Mtg, 6:30 pm, Running W
Wed. 1/9 – Kent Clover Calf Mtg., 7:00 pm, Kennedyville United Methodist Church
Sat. 1/12 – 4-H Market Beef and Dairy Steer Weighing & Tagging, 10 am, Kent Ag Center. Please contact office with # and type of steer asap. Animal must be present. (Snow date 1/19)
Sun. 1/13 – Triple Shots Shotgun Practice, Kent Gun Club
Tues. 1/15 – Senior Portfolios for Out-of-State Trips due to MD State 4-H Office.
Wed. 1/16 – Toy Drive Wrap-up & Thank You Writing, 6-7 pm, Ext. Office
Wed. 1/16 – Jr. Leadership Council (JLC), 7 pm, Ext. Office
Thurs. 1/17 – Ag Center Board Mtg, 7 pm, Ext. Office
Thurs. 1/17 – UME 4-H Online Volunteer Training Webinar, 6:30 – 8:30 pm. For all new 4-H volunteers. Must register in Kent Office 3-5 days prior.
DEADLINE: Kent 4-H Gala Basket Items due by end of day. Please support our donation to help raise funds at the MD 4-H Gala. Items can be anything that fits our theme of “4-H Family Fun Night”
Sun. 1/20 – Triple Shots Archery Practice, Cypress Creek
Sun. 1/20 – MD 4-H Gala, 3-6 pm, Martin’s West, Baltimore. 7 4-H’ers will be recognized with awards or scholarships and Kent 4-H & Triple Shots will receive grants.
Mon. 1/21 – Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday – Ext. Office Closed
Tues. 1/22 – DEADLINE: All 4-H Record Books and Clover Memory Books are due by 4:30 pm or after hours from 5:15 – 6:00 pm in the Extension Office.
Tues. 1/22 – DEADLINE: 4-H Achievement Award Nominations due to Ext. Office or electronically.
Wed. 1/23 – 4H Online Re-enrollment Help Session, 6:30 – 7:30 pm, Ext. Office. Must register.
Fri. 1/25 – Record Book Judging Night (all volunteers welcome!!!), 6:00 pm Pizza and Judging training, 6:30 pm – Judging begins.
Sat. 1/26 – Record Book Judging, 10:00 am – until, Ext. Office.
Sat. 1/26 – 4H Online Re-enrollment Help Session, 11 am – 12 pm, Ext. Office. Must register.
Sun. 1/27 – Kent Clover Kids (Marshmallow Science & Fun!), 1-3 pm, Ext. Office
Mon. 1/28 – Fuzzy Tails club Mtg., 6:30 pm, Greenscapes
Tues. 1/29 – Leaders Council, 7:00 pm, Ext. Office – Award Voting!
Wed. 1/30 – DEADLINE: 4-H Club Charter Renewal Packets Due to Extension Office. Uploaded to State Office by 1/31.
Wed. 1/30 – Interview Skills for seniors, 7:00 pm, Ext. Office. Interview How to workshop but especially for seniors interviewing for out-of-state trips on 2/2.
Thurs. 1/31 – Code Your World 4-H Science Experiment, 6:30 – 8:30 pm, Ext. Office.

KENT COUNTY 4-H CLUB MEETING DATES

Bits and Bridles Horse Club – Meets 1st Monday business meeting: Feb., Apr., June, Aug., Oct., Dec. Activity on all other months 6:00pm, Kennedyville United Methodist Church.

Kent 4-H Triple Shots Shooting Sports Shotgun – Meets 2nd Sunday, Noon, Kent County Gun Club, 4th Sunday, Noon, Sudlersville Skeet Club, Archery, 1st and 3rd Sundays, 2pm, Cypress Creek Archery, Millington, Summer: Kent Ag Center, Rifle, 2nd and 4th Sundays, 2-4pm, Kent Ag Center Rifle Range, Tolchester. Business meeting held the 1st Wednesday of every month, 6:30pm, Kent Co. Public Works Complex

Junior Dairy AssociatesMeets 3rd Friday monthly, 7pm, Kennedyville United Methodist Church

Kent Clover CalfMeets2nd Wednesday, 7pm, Kennedyville United Methodist Church

Kent Fuzzy Tails & Shiny Scales– 4th Monday monthly, 6:30pm, Greenscapes Land Care, Kennedyville

Kent Puppy Pals 4-H Dog ClubPractice 3rd and 4th Wednesdays, 6:30pm, winter: Radcliffe Creek School, summer:  Running W Kennels, Worton. Monthly business meeting, 2nd Tuesday, Running W Kennels, 6:30pm

The University of Maryland, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources programs are open to all and will not discriminate against anyone because of race, age, sex, color, sexual orientation, physical or mental disability, religion, ancestry, or national origin, marital status,genetic information, or political affiliation, or gender identity and expression.

Spy House of the Week: St. Mary’s Square: Tarr House Transformation

James Braddock’s eighteenth century urban design for St. Michaels created St. Mary’s Square as a residential street with public open space.  Unfortunately, only half of the square remains today whose boundary is defined by a ring of nineteenth century homes. William Tarr made his living from the water and his home, circa 1860, is one of the largest and best preserved. The front elevation retains its original massing with a main wing, full front porch with a decorative handrail and eave brackets under a hipped metal roof and a secondary “telescoped” wing.  The lap siding, 6/6 windows with wood shutters and the wood shake roof have been carefully preserved. Remarkably, the rear yard still includes two detached outbuildings one of which was the original kitchen.

The house has been restored and renovated by a developer with a special appreciation for historic preservation whose portfolio includes houses in the Historic District on Locust, Carpenter and Fremont Streets. To update the house for today’s living, a rear addition added space on the main floor for a kitchen/family room and screened porch. The second floor of the addition added a spacious master bedroom with exposed beams and double pairs of windows, a master bathroom with both a shower and a claw foot tub, a half bath and another screened porch. The original main floor contains the center stair between the living and dining room and the “telescoped” area is now a bedroom and bath for a main floor master suite or guest bedroom. The original second floor bedrooms and bath remain. The windows, deep elliptical archways with wood trim, refinished hardwood floors and the fireplace surround and mantel evoke another era.

My favorite rooms were the second floor screened porch where I could imagine falling asleep on a hammock while catching a gentle breeze and the room behind it tucked under the “telescoped” wing with a gambrel shaped ceiling and exposed beams. I would use that room as a TV room and combine it with the screened porch to make a perfect indoor/ outdoor family room.

 

For more information about this property, contact Cornelia Heckenbach at Long and Foster Real Estate Inc., 410-745-0283 (v), 410-310-1229 (c) or info@corneliaheckenbach.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity.”

 

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Spy Architecture Lecture by Simon Jacobsen Set for January 19

The Spy is pleased to announce that Simon Jacobsen will make a presentation of his firm’s work over the Martin Luther King holiday weekend on Saturday, January 19th, from 5:00 to 6:30 at the St. Michaels Inn in St. Michaels. Simon is the son of Hugh Newell Jacobsen and they formed Jacobsen Architecture in 2007.  Tickets can be purchased here.

Our Habitat Jenn Martella, summarized their work recently in the Spy and we have re-published it here: 

My second job as an architectural intern was with Gini L. Pettus & Associates in Atlanta. The focus of her practice was interior commercial architecture but we both enjoyed discussing residential architecture and soon discovered our mutual admiration for the work of Hugh Newell Jacobsen.

After I moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004, I was delighted to discover two of his houses from excursions with friends on the water. After visiting the firm’s website, I learned that Jacobsen had designed several houses in Talbot County and his Bachelor of Arts degree was from the University of Maryland. I like to think that on breaks from his studies he made sojourns to the Eastern Shore to enjoy the peaceful pre-Bay Bridge rural architecture and landscape.

What I admire about Jacobsen’s work is how he drew his inspiration from the distinctively American vernacular rural architecture-sheds, smokehouses, detached kitchens and barns. The essence of his iconic style were series of pavilions devoid of ornamentation that evoked Shaker architectural design. His contemporary interpretation of the “telescope” houses of the Eastern Shore, became, in his gifted hands, simple geometric plans with gable roofs and chimneys that rose through the steep roof planes to become sculptural elements. His unique style set him apart from his fellow second-generation Modernists peers.

He also designed houses ranging from Jackie Kennedy Onassis’ home on Martha’s Vineyard to the “1998 Life Dream House,” Life Magazine’s promotion of houses designed by famous architects whose plans were made available to the public.

His son Simon is the Founding Principal of Jacobsen Architecture and explains his firm’s design philosophy as “…our detailing is deliberately sparse and linear in order to enhance the spaces within and without … the site is the dominant factor. The quality of the light upon that particular area of earth is always unique and determines the path the architecture will take.” The firm’s houses on the Eastern Shore embody that design philosophy and my favorite of the Eastern Shore houses is the original Green Residence that as of 2017 has a new owner.

The Greene Residence was built on the Wye East River close to the Chesapeake Bay. The client, a New York advertising executive, retained Hugh Newell Jacobsen in 1971 to design a year-around house. On one of his first visits to the site, the client sprinkled cedar seedlings along the shoreline that have matured into a tall grove to protect the house from the winter storms off the Bay and to frame and shade the exquisite house.

Like the older houses of the Tidewater, the Green house has white walls and steep roofs but the similarity ends there. Unlike historic Tidewater houses, this plan’s massing and functions are organized into pavilions defined by the function within. Some of the pavilions are linked by connections with walls of frameless panes of glass resting on brick sills for a striking solid/void juxtaposition of wall and glass. Other pavilions are slightly shifted from each other with just enough space for construction workers to accomplish their tasks. The lack of exterior soffits, gutters and trim is a careful and deliberate abstraction of traditional detailing.

Many of the pavilions have floor to ceiling glass panes at the main level to create an “outlook” to the landscape and water beyond. Above the large glass panes are two levels of multi-paned transoms. The bottom row is open to the main floor of the pavilion and the upper row becomes windows for the second floor. The lack of interior trim allows the wall and floor planes to seamlessly merge and the steep pitched roofs with dormers creates delightful spaces for the guest suites or the loft for the Owner’s artistic endeavors.

The Green house consists of six pavilions. There are two center pavilions with the front pavilion being the entrance hall and support functions. Behind the entry pavilion a short hall leads to the rear sitting room pavilion that faces the water. The rear corners of this dramatic room are floor to ceiling glass panels and the massive chimney rises through the pitched ceiling. At the front corners, glass walled connections on each side lead to two pavilions that are set on a diagonal to the entry and sitting room pavilions. The kitchen/breakfast and dining room pavilion is on the right and is slightly shifted from the garage pavilion by a solid connection. Off the kitchen pavilion, the long pool reaches out to the water and a fence hides the motor court of the garage pavilion. On the left, another sitting room pavilion and the master suite pavilion complete the composition. Terraces off the sitting rooms offer expansive views of the water.

Two guest suites were located on the second floor. One suite is accessed by a “U” shaped cantilevered stair that floats above the floor of the diagonal sitting room pavilion and the other suite is accessed by a spiral stair in the kitchen pavilion. Since the two suites are separated by the main sitting room pavilion, they have total privacy.

The interiors are white to better reflect the light from the varied sources and the firm’s signature “Eggcrate” bookcases are found in the diagonal sitting room. The Mid-Century Modern furnishings include the leather and polished chrome Le Corbusier sofas and the wood Scandinavian dining room table and chairs. It would be very difficult for this architect to choose a favorite detail but the vista from one of the glass-walled connections through the glass corner of the adjacent pavilion to the water beyond was breathtaking.

The Green Residence is a masterpiece of a gifted architect’s vision of domestic architecture in the early 20th century. The photographs that accompany this article were taken last year and belie the age of this iconic house.

Jacobsen Architecture was founded in 2007 by Hugh and Simon Jacobsen and is the recipient of over 140 awards in architecture, design and interiors. The firm’s work spans from much of the US, Caribbean, Europe, and Asia. Besides many accolades and publications, the firm has been nominated for the AIA’s Gold Medal four times and is longest running recipient of Architectural Digest’s AD100, the magazine’s list of the top 100 design talents internationally. The Jacobsens are currently working on a new book to be published by Rizzoli titled “Jacobsen Architecture: 12 Houses by Hugh and Simon Jacobsen”.

If you are one of the lucky few on the Eastern Shore to own a Jacobsen house, please contact the Spy as we would welcome another opportunity to feature more of these unique American houses.

For further inspiration, visit the firm’s website . Photographs of the Green Residence courtesy of Sean Shananhan Photography, Sean@shanahanphotography.com, 703-582-9462. 

The Spy is pleased to announce that Simon Jacobsen will make a presentation of his firm’s work over the Martin Luther King holiday weekend on Saturday, January 19th, from 5:00 to 6:30 at the St. Michaels Inn in St. Michaels MD, 1228 S. Talbot Street. Click here for ticket sales.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Spy Holiday House: Boxwood Hall

This is my second holiday card to Spy readers and I am delighted to feature the Easton home of Jeffrey Parker. Jeffrey is a native of Cambridge, MD and received an undergraduate degree in interior design and architecture from the University of Maryland at College Park. After working for a roster of international clients for prestigious firms in Washington D.C. , Muscat, Oman and New York City, he established his own interior design firm in New York city in 1998.  

After spending weekends in his East Hampton home for 20 years, the Eastern Shore beckoned and he bought a weekend house in Cooke’s Hope in 2012.  The two-story traditional brick house had a detached garage that was connected to the main house by a breezeway. Upon moving into the house Jeffrey then began his transformation. A second floor above the garage became a family room with guest bathroom, the screened porch became a French-doored sunroom and the two structures were united by a breezeway with French doors leading to the newly constructed swimming pool.

After solving other interior architecture issues, Jeffrey turned his discriminating eye to the interiors. Moldings and custom finishes added a layer of elegance and each of the bathrooms were redesigned. The dormant third-floor space became a proper third floor for the residence which now has two generous guest suites. What had been a large attic was transformed by the addition of three traditional dormers on the front façade and a shed dormer on the rear elevation to expand the space.  

The rear yard was then enclosed by a traditional brick wall with Napoleon caps and was enhanced by a pool and outdoor fireplace to become an outdoor room for entertaining and  relaxing with family and friends.

The entertaining spaces are important as Jeffrey is more than an occasional visitor to Easton. Passionate about the arts, he is currently a board member and president of the Mid-Atlantic Symphony Orchestra and a trustee of the Academy Art Museum. He continues to also be active with the board of the Easton Choral Arts Society and at Christ Church Easton.

He is passionate about Christmas and his home, Boxwood Hall, is annually decked to the nines with festive holiday decorations including six Christmas trees which display an array of antique and 20th Century blown glass ornaments.  Jeffrey began this collection when he was 8 years old.  

For more information about Jeffrey, visit his website jeffreyparkerinteriors.com, or contact Jeffrey at jeffrey@jefferyparkerinteriors .com.

Many thanks to the sellers who have invited me into their homes, the agents and their administrative assistants who have shared their pictures with me and my fellow architects who shared their creative work.

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

 

Spy House of the Week: Second Look at Second Tree

When I was active in real estate, I attended an open house at this property several years ago. I decided to take a second look at Second Tree and see what changes the current owners made. The spectacular waterfront setting is at the confluence of San Domingo Creek and Broad Creek as they flow into the Choptank River.

The original house had a typical traditional floor plan with the living, dining, kitchen and support rooms on the main floor and the bedrooms and baths upstairs.  The house was transformed by several additions that encapsulated the original footprint. One addition contains the library and office; the “River Room” addition has panoramic views of the water; another addition contains the billiard room and media rooms and the master suite addition is also oriented to the water.  

The architectural changes begin with a porte cochere at the front door that is carefully detailed with columns, dropped beams, a paneled ceiling with recessed lighting,light-colored interlocking pavers and red brick steps that combine to create a gracious entrance. One side addition contains a gable with two windows and a porthole window above that would become a recurring detail in the architecture. Tall windows pierce the eave portion of the addition to break up the sections of walls of the library and office spaces. The other side addition has both dormer windows that match the original dormers of the second floor and another gable wing with a porthole window.

After the floor plan and the architecture were resolved, the talented owner turned her discriminating eye to the interior design. The formal living room with its coffered ceiling is exquisite with its fireplace flanked by antique sideboards and framed mirrors. The color palette of cream, light rose and light yellow was a serene space to relax by the fire and watch the sunset over the water.

The stunning river room’s perimeter wall is a series of bays with French doors, sidelights and transoms connected by soffits that rest on a paneled wall. Each bay is accented by pitched ceilings, light coves and a porthole window. The sitting area projects beyond the adjacent areas to break up the large space into intimate entertaining areas. I thought how tranquill it must be to sit in that room in the winter as snow fell to create a winter wonderland beyond. The main floor also contains a media room and a billiard room for indoor entertainment after one tired of the pool or tennis court on the grounds.

The detailing of the mahogany woodwork, arched ceilings between the tall windows and seating grouped around the antique fireplace from the Loire Valley created a dramatic library space that led to the adjacent office with its mahogany walls, millwork and coffered ceiling.

The ground floor master bedroom wing projected beyond the exterior wall and was surrounded on three sides with French doors and windows for sunset views over the water. My favorite child’s bedroom had sloped ceilings with dormer windows, and colorful splashes of light blue, orange and cream in the bed linen and furnishings.

Second Tree is definitely worth a second look and is testament to a talented owner who had the design skills and means to achieve her individual vision.

For more information about this property, contact Sheila Monahan with Benson & Mangold Real Estate at 410-822-1415 (o), 410-924-4163 (c), or shebattin@aol.com,  “Equal Housing Opportunity”.

Photography by Jim McKee, Broadview Interactive LLC, 703-593-4392, www.broad-view.net, jim.mckee@broad-view.net.

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Spy House of the Week: English Country Elegance

My first impression of this charming house’s front elevation was that it could have been a cover of Town and Country magazine. This Anglophile loves the English cottage style and I was immediately hooked by the range of textures-stone foundation, steps, terrace and first floor cladding of the detached garage; the juxtaposition of the stucco with board and batten accents; and the metal shed roofs with the architectural shingles. The massing of the main wing of the house was very pleasing with two gables between the front porch, a shed dormer centered over the double entry doors below and two windows with shutters and a “barn” style fixed panel above on each gable.

The secondary wing was utterly charming with its accents of color and texture. The teal blue iron fence and gate opened onto a stone path that meandered through the English garden complete with a Lutyens bench.  Stone steps led to the door tucked under a stoop with a climbing plant spiraling up the column. The deep slate blue of the door and window shutters with flowering plants on the window sill and the green of the shrubbery was another magazine shot.

The dramatic entrance hall with its walls of deep salmon and the gray and white  checkerboard floor of various sized panels becomes the spine of the house that links the rooms. The spacious and stylish sitting room had decorative wood beams, sliding barn paneled doors with arched tops, a period fireplace with an artful arrangement of ceramics and objects d’arte and French doors to the terrace. The deep chocolate brown walls of the dining room, the pitched ceiling and another period fireplace created a charming spot to linger over a snifter of brandy by the fire.

The kitchen fireplace was raised and an arched alcove below echoed the arched decorative piece above. The cream color palette of the cabinetry, the stained wood island with decorative inserts, the copper accents of the range hood and pendant fixtures and the armoire for storing special pieces would be a very pleasant space for any cook. A range of options for breakfast or informal meals included the table and chairs in the kitchen by the wall of windows, the rattan dining set in the potting room or the table in the screened porch.

The master suite contained two rooms whose wall treatments were the same and the spacious bedroom with its pencil post bed, white coverlet, tall windows with transoms above with views to the rear landscape was a quiet retreat. The adjacent sitting room had another fireplace flanked by millwork for books and art, comfortable seating with a large ottoman for resting one’s feet and a window seat underneath the large bay window with views of the water.

The upstairs hall repeated the deep salmon color of the entrance hall below and the stair landing ended at a seating area underneath the front elevation’s shed dormer trio of windows. The interior architecture of the bedrooms varied from flat to pitched ceilings with dormers and sunlight from windows or skylights to create sunny spaces.

This waterfront house was built in 2005 but its style and gardens are a wonderful homage to the English country style-jolly good!

 

For more information about this property, contact Barb Watkins with Benson and Mangold at 410-822-1415 (o), 410-310-2021 (c), or barb.c.watkins@gmail.com,  “Equal Housing Opportunity.”

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

 

Talbot County Garden Club Centennial Book Wins National Award

National Garden Clubs, Inc. has awarded the Talbot County Garden Club the Tommy Donnan Certificate of Merit for its book covering the history of the Club’s first one hundred years –“Talbot County Garden Club, 1917 – 2017.”

“There are so many delightful nuggets entwining the work of the Talbot County Garden Club with Talbot County history in this book,” said Rita Osgood, president of Talbot County Garden Club.  “We are proud of our Centennial book and are thrilled that it won a national award.”

The project began when the Club made plans for its Centennial year.  Under the guidance of past Club presidents Caroline Benson and Trish Reynolds, a number of events were planned to celebrate the Club’s history – banners were hung in downtown Easton, several special events were held, thousands of daffodils were planted along the By-Pass, and the award-winning book documenting 100 years of club activities was written by club members.

Club member, Missy Warfield, led the project as Editor-in-Chief and almost a dozen club members contributed to the book. The Club’s history unfolds through chapters not only outlining the Club’s history, but also that of America and the Eastern Shore of Maryland.

Working with the incredible cooperation of the staff at the Maryland Room of the Talbot County Free Library, the archivist of the Talbot Historical Society and the Club’s own archives, the writers gleaned little known facts and historical photos for the book.

Wrapped in a colorful dust jacket bright with yellow daffodils, the award-winning book is available for sale at the Talbot Historical Society’s Tharp Antiques & Decorative Arts for $40. Tharp is located at 25 S. Washington Street and is open Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. – 3 p.m.  Books also may be purchased by mail order from the Talbot County Garden Club by sending a check for $43.50 (payable to TCGC) to P.O. Box 1524, Easton, MD, 21601.  Price includes postage.

The book would make a perfect holiday gift for friends and family who have lived in or visited Talbot County and, perhaps, may have admired the work of the Garden Club in the Historical Society Gardens, the Fountain Garden at Idlewild Park or some of the many other public gardens maintained by the Club. Don’t miss owning a copy of this limited-edition, award-winning book.

About the Talbot County Garden Club

The Talbot County Garden Club was established in 1917 to enrich the natural beauty of the environment by sharing knowledge of gardening, fostering the art of flower arranging, maintaining civic projects, supporting projects that benefit Talbot County and encouraging the conservation of natural resources.  Noteworthy projects include maintaining the grounds of the Talbot Historical Society, Talbot Courthouse, Talbot Library, the fountain and childrens gardens at Idlewild Park and numerous other gardens and activities.  There are currently a total of 109 active, associate and honorary members.

Mid-Shore Habitat: The Whimsical Metal Sculpture of David Dunn

Last night I decorated my Christmas tree with one of my older siblings while we listened to the Vince Guaraldi Trio Christmas album, better known to other  “Peanuts” fans as the soundtrack  to “A Charlie Brown Christmas”. Now that my tree is resplendent with all my beloved ornaments from Christmases past, the floor is bare and in need of presents!

The perfect unique gift for the gardener or art lover on my list would be one of the whimsical sea creature sculptures of local artist David Dunn. David grew up in  DC and spent summers and holidays at his family’s waterfront Bozman home. From an early age, he would take driftwood and other Bay detritus deposited by the high tides and repurpose them into three-dimensional art. The Chesapeake Bay provided an unlimited source of found materials which later inspired his “Sea Creatures” series of metal art.

As the son of a diplomat, David spent his early years in Paris where he was captivated by art and later attended the College of Charleston where he majored in theater. His focus was prop design and fabrication but art still beckoned. As his interest in metal design grew, he decided to do post-graduate work in welding.

This training, his innate design talent, his love of the Chesapeake Bay and his life-long interest in “found” objects culminated in his current series “Kings of the Sea” which is fabricated entirely in metal and painted in bright colors.

His workday begins by looking at life that exists in and around the Bay waters and foraging for items he then repurposes into new life forms.  These items include industrial parts, bike gear mechanisms, clamps, and bolts that in his creative hands are transformed into “sea creatures” and “tool critters”. In one of my favorite critters, the handle of a wrench became the spine, the clamps the teeth and the bolts the eyes. In another delightful critter, a helmet and cutlery were transformed into a turtle. Some critters maintain their metal color while others are brightly painted like the captivating “Sailfish.”

David’s work can be found in private collections both local and national including clients on the Eastern Shore and New York City, Key West, Malibu and Washington DC. Currently his “Octopus King of the Sea” is on exhibit at the Academy of Art in Easton through mid-January.

I firmly believe a daily touch of whimsy is good for the soul. Now that gardens are becoming dormant until spring, one of David’s colorful whimsical creations may be just the antidote to the winter doldrums and the perfect gift for the gardener on your list!

For further inspiration visit David’s website at www.dunninmetal or contact him via email at dunninmetal@gmail.com or call 202-390-1881.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Habitat House of the Week: Sherwood Style

I was completely charmed by this Colonial house that reminded me of my sister’s summer home on Long Island years ago. The exterior color palette of gray shingle siding that had aged beautifully, white trim, large windows with blue shutters and the free-standing red brick chimney gave the house great charm and character. The front porch had space for two rocking chairs for views of Broad Creek across the road and one side had a screened porch wing that overlooked a large swimming pool. The owners graciously gave me a tour of the house which began with meeting their dog, Asta, named for the famous dog of Nick and Nora Charles in Dashiell Hammett’s “Thin Man” series.

When I told the owners I enjoyed learning about an older house’s history, they shared what they knew of their house’s provenance. It had probably been slave quarters in the 1700’s and sometime in the mid-20th century the house was moved to its present location. Since then, several additions were made with great sensitivity to the original structure’s massing and with careful preservation of original details including the beautiful wood floors.

The front door opened opposite the stairs between the living and dining rooms. Instead of a wall, a pilaster next to a slightly offset column at each end of the room defined the boundary between circulation around the stairs and living space. A bay wing at the side wall contained the fireplace and chimney flanked by windows. The warm mocha colored walls, white trim and neutral furnishings enhanced the open feeling of the space and created an inviting living room.

The dining room was visually connected to the kitchen by a door and a wall opening and French doors at the side led to the screened porch and the pool beyond. The kitchen had great personality with its blend of old and new. I loved how the ceiling finish had been removed from the ceiling joists above the kitchen to reveal the hand hewn profile of each original joist. The dark color was a pleasing counterpoint to the lighter finish of the tile floor. A soffit cleverly concealed ductwork and became a portal to the back rooms.

Another original stair, this one with winders, led to the master suite above. The stair risers were painted white but the stair treads were a range of primary colors for a delightful touch of whimsy. I was quite envious of the mud room with its storage piece for coats and wellies, a half bath, laundry and side door to the driveway.

The second floor contained two rooms on either side of the central stairs. One was a guest bedroom and the other room was the owner’s sewing room with her intriguing collection of antique sewing machines. My favorite room was the master bedroom with its pitched ceiling and dormer windows. An antique iron bed with its beautiful quilt, other wood antique pieces, a splash of modern in the colorful rug and the sheer window treatments that filtered the sunlight created a peaceful retreat. All that was missing was a fireplace at the end to create a late-night inglenook with cozy chairs.

This charming house gets high marks for its architecture and lovely interiors. Ironically, the owners are moving to a contemporary waterfront house that was a House of the Week earlier this year!

 

For more information about this property, contact Melanie Hopkins with Long and Foster Real Estate at 410-745-0283 (o),410-310-2893 (c) or Melanie.Hopkins@LongandFoster.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity”.

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.