House of the Week:  Georgian Splendor in the Grass

George III may have lost the American Colonies but he and the other three Hanoverian Georges who ruled England from 1714-1830 gave their name to the architectural style prevalent during their reigns that was inspired by the proportion and symmetry of classical Greece and Rome.  This stately home in the heart of Easton’s Historic District has many of the identifying characteristics of the Georgian style – the symmetry of the front elevation, stucco façade, front entry embellishment, side-gabled roof with dormers, and 12/12 upper windowpanes. The deep lot that extends from Harrison Street to the rear alley enabled the construction of an addition to update the home without impacting the original historic house. 

The main floor of the original part of the house has a vestibule that leads to a spacious entrance hall with a curved stairway to the second floor. Vistas through the sitting room and sunroom beyond, and wide doorways to the dining room to the left and the drawing room on the right make the entrance hall a light and bright space. The stunning drawing room has windows at the front and rear and French doors between the fireplace lead to the larger of the two sunrooms. Each side of the drawing room’s seating group around the fireplace has a long sofa, table and side table which leaves room for easy flow through the room to the adjacent large sunroom.  Three sets of triple windows and French doors at the rear of the sunroom that lead to the rear lawn bring sunlight into the room throughout the day. The ceiling material is stained wood to contrast with the gray stone paving of the floor and the fireplace chimney accented in darker gray.  

The small sitting room behind the entrance hall connects to the kitchen and to the smaller sunroom so it has indirect light from the sunroom’s French doors with transoms. The ceiling of the small sunroom is pitched to give the room more volume and the sloped ceiling is finished  with the same stained wood as the larger sunroom.

The dining room has daylight from the front and side windows and gray walls with  a white wainscot below. A large Oriental rug anchors the round wood table with chairs upholstered in a creamy fabric with stud accents along the top and side of the chairs’ backs. Part of the white wainscot is broken by built-in millwork with glass fronts for china display. The open plan kitchen, informal dining area and another seating room is the hub of the house.  It is the first part of the addition to the house and has views of the lawn through the sunroom French doors and the sitting room windows and French doors. Paneled piers define the informal dining area to maintain the openness of the spaces. The side wall of the informal dining area has built-in millwork with cabinets below and open shelves above with the rear wall painted gray to highlight the white china. The large kitchen with white cabinets, light countertops, stainless steel appliances and the island with its contrasting butcher block counter would inspire any cook. The wood floors and wood ceiling enables the white cabinets to stand out and define the space. The sitting room with a fireplace and TV is a great space to relax with family and friends. A master suite with its own screened porch and garage completes the main floor.

The bedrooms are contained within the original house perimeter, with the exception of an extension for the second master bedroom with windows on three sides for daylight.  Between the windows on the rear wall are two French doors that lead to a large deck and bonus room over the garage. The master bath has a bay window with a seat below, dual pedestal sinks, wall-mounted medicine cabinets, a large shower with a glass door and plenty of built-ins for storage. The other bedrooms are located on the other side of the staircase for privacy. The bedrooms are also beautifully appointed and have windows on two sides of the room for added daylight.  One bedroom has built-in millwork between a window with a seat below. The third floor with dormer windows has space for an office and a game room with great views of the neighborhood.  

Stately historic architecture on over half an acre with modern updates- an unbeatable combination in the heart of Easton’s Historic District! 

For more information about this property, contact Trey Rider with TTR Sotheby’s International Realty at 410-280-5600  (o),443-786-0235 (c) or trey@treyrider.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity”.

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

 

Spy Habitat House of the Week: Hanson Historic

This house in the heart of Easton’s Historic District has a generous lot with a wide side yard and deep rear yard surrounded by fencing or landscaped for privacy. One of my own favorite past homes was an American Four-Square like this house with its wrap-around front porch.  Part of this porch has been infilled with windows to make a sunroom and I appreciated how the continuous wall of windows was carefully detailed to look as if the sunroom had been original to the house. I especially liked the elevation from the street with a dense hedge along the right side and a white picket fence along the sidewalk framing the front elevation with the three-bay porch, second floor windows below the hipped roof broken by a center gable and attic accent window. The roomy front porch depth has a swing and Adirondack rocking chairs for relaxing. 

The front door at the right side porch bay opens onto a spacious entrance hall with light filtering from the window of the “U” shaped stairs to the second floor.  The stairs are beautifully detailed with wood newel posts and top rail with painted paneled stringers and spindles. I was charmed by the petite powder room tucked under the stairs with its small patterned wallpaper and the white porcelain wall mounted lavatory with a scalloped edge and floral accents. Beyond the entrance hall is the kitchen with light green cabinets and butcher block countertops and the pantry/laundry with a view to the lush rear yard. 

A wide wall opening with built-in millwork connects the dining room at the front of the house to the sunroom with its tall casement windows that open to transform this room a screened porch.  The original parlor with side windows is a cozy space to relax by the fireplace.  

Part of the house’s original rear wall was removed for an expansion to create a spacious multi-purpose room.  A long window seat with pillows is the perfect spot for curling up with a favorite book and the upholstered rattan seating group at the rear corner and antique pieces and plants with views of the rear landscaped yard creates a charming and private space.

All the second floor bedrooms were more spacious than you would expect in an older house. The rooms were daylit from windows on at least two sides. All the bedrooms had good sized closets and one bedroom had a nook with a large closet that could also be a sitting area.  Stylish historic architecture, great ground floor plan with easy flow among the rooms, spacious bedrooms and a landscaped lot with a pool-all this and a Historic District location too!

For more information about this property, contact Kathryn Bogan with Shoreline Realty, Inc,  at 410-822-7556 (o), 410-310-6814 (c) or vipvacationrentals.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity”.

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Spy House of the Week: Modernism in Neavitt

The previous house on this waterfront lot in Neavitt was a dim memory by the time the architect Mark McInturff saw the site’s potential for a weekend home for himself.  Given the Critical Area constraints, the lot was surveyed and the foundation was carefully excavated to determine the allowable buildable area. Since the allowable footprint turned out to be the size of a double-wide trailer, the architect’s design solution maximized the house’s footprint with a rectangular ground floor and three other floors layered asymmetrically above in various arrangements that also created decks at each upper level.  

The exterior’s wood shingled siding has weathered naturally to a beautiful warm gray accented by white window frames without trim. Cantilevering the front and rear walls of the house a few feet above grade from the recessed foundation gave the walls an appearance of floating in air. The stairs to the front door and from the sliding doors at the rear have deep treads to elongate the form to become another layer of the house and the railings’ combination of weathered boards and stainless steel cables accentuate their transparency.

Given the house’s three stories and roof top deck for the swimming pool, the weight of the structure is borne by cross-braced steel frames which define the three-bay ground floor plan. The entire steel frame is exposed so the beams create coffered ceilings and each bay’s interior “wall” is another “X” frame.  One bay contains the main seating area with a fireplace and millwork; the middle bay is the dining area and the other end bay is another sitting area next to the kitchen at the front of the house. The service functions (laundry, stairs) are located at the front of the house. I especially liked how the “X” bracing segments crossed over the solid end walls’ center porthole windows to become a layer of muntins over the glass. Each bay of the entire rear wall is elegantly detailed with full height picture windows flanked by single sliding doors with horizontal rails so the entire space becomes a porch. One sliding door leads to the deck and steps to the rear lawn.

Stacking the two bedrooms creates total privacy and makes each suite an individual penthouse. The master suite on the second floor has a spacious sleeping area with its picture window and sliding doors to access the deck that surrounds the entire floor for panoramic water views, broken only by the stairwell. The luxurious bath includes an oversized shower.

The third floor guest suite has its picture window flanked by sliding doors with horizontal rails at the water side.  The rear wall of the third floor sleeping area extends over the deck below to create a covered outdoor space for the second floor bedroom. The stair landing at the third  level also leads to a side deck with stairs up to the rooftop pool and its deck. How could one resist a moonlight swim or early morning lap before breakfast, high above the rooftops of the adjacent houses?

The rear yard is a true outdoor room with its tall walls of green hedges and trees that frame the water view. Chairs and tables set onto the lawn provide front row seats for relaxing and contemplating the sunset after a day on the water. At dusk when the rooms are illuminated from within the stacked composition of light and structure is breathtaking.

The deceptively simple floor plan was in reality very carefully thought out to maximize every square inch of space, and meticulously detailed, not unlike boat design. The white interiors that reflect the light, the decks on the upper floors and the crisp detailing of this remarkable house by a Modernist Master is simply stunning.

Architecture by McInturff Architects, 301-229-3705,  www.mcinturffarchitects.com. Design Team:  Mark McInturff FAIA and Christopher Boyd.  Photography by Julia Heine

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

House of the Week: Board & Batten on Bailey’s Neck 

I love the texture of board and batten siding and how sunlight casts shadows over the walls so this traditional story and a half house’s exterior elevations caught my eye. The proportions and massing of the front elevation is very pleasing with the main pitched roof extending over the three-bay porch,  the garage wing with its gable projection and the brick faced pitched roof wing of the living room on the opposite side in contrast to the white board and batten walls. The rear of the house opens up with a shed dormer over the center wing for the second floor bedrooms and a gable over the sunroom adds further interest. The house sits in the middle of two beautifully landscaped acres adjacent to the golf course.

I rarely write about houses whose furnishings have been removed since I love interior design but this house gave me an opportunity to study the interior architecture. The front door opens into a spacious entrance hall with a side “L” shaped stair that connects to the handrail at the second floor hall.  Vistas through to the dining room windows and to the living room maintains the feeling of openness. The large living room with a fireplace leads to the sunroom overlooking the rear lawn and landscaping. The house flows very well from the sunroom to the dining room, kitchen, breakfast room and family room and the large terrace at the rear is easily accessible  for relaxing with family and friends. A side entry door next to the garage leads to the mud room and laundry. The remainder of the main floor is the master suite, accessed from a short hall off the entrance hall.  

The second floor is larger than it looks from the exterior with three  bedrooms and a smaller fourth one that could become a home office or studio. I liked the sloped areas along the perimeter of the ceilings and the hardwood floors of the second floor rooms. One thing I would do if this house were mine would be to open up the wall between the breakfast room and the family room. Small change to a space plan that has great bones!

For more information about this property, contact Barb Watkins with Benson and Mangold at 410-822-1415 (o), 410-310-2021 (c), or barb.c.watkins@gmail.com,  “Equal Housing Opportunity.”

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Spy House of the Week: Cooke’s Hope Cottage

Last week I attended a board meeting at a member’s house in Cooke’s Hope and once again I was charmed by the layout of the neighborhood. The entry drive past the bucolic pastures, the non-grid streets lined with sidewalks under mature trees, distinctive architectural styles and walking trails are a few of the amenities that give this well-established neighborhood great appeal.

I drove past this house and the massing, offsets and architectural details of this cottage style house caught my eye. The entry wing has a triangular dormer with a half-moon accent window centered over the entry door below and the main roof breaks to become a shed roof that covers the five bay full front porch with its articulated columns and handrail. The kitchen is offset just enough to provide a side window for the front sitting room for additional sunlight. The wide bay window at the side elevation is the focal point of the kitchen within.  The final offset of the garage wing provides a side window for the dining room as well as access from the rear yard and patio to the mud room/laundry.

The floor plan works very well with the entire right side of the house devoted to a spacious master suite including an office at the front of the house overlooking the porch.  Another sitting room is across the office from the entrance hall. At the middle of the house is the living room, dining room and family room. Even though it is an interior room, the living room feels spacious since the stairway has an open handrail, the room’s high ceiling is open to the second floor and the cross vista through the adjacent family room ends in windows. The living room seating is grouped around the fireplace with millwork for books and collectibles. I liked how the back wall of the millwork was painted a deep red, all the better to highlight the colorful ceramics. The dining room is connected to the living room with a wide doorway and the antique furnishings, chandelier and faux-finish walls with a white wainscot below creates a gracious space for making any dinner an occasion.

The spacious family room at the rear of the house has triple pairs of sliding doors to the patio and views to the beautifully landscaped areas around the perimeter of the property. The large room has several seating areas for relaxing or watching TV.  I loved the kitchen with its hutch styled cabinetry on one side with a backdrop of deep green to accentuate the fine china and crystal, the wide bay window instead of upper cabinets and the contrasting dark wood island and wood floor.

The master bedroom at the rear of the house has windows on two walls for daylight throughout the day. The pale yellow walls, drapery and valance, wood furnishings, the delicate floral pattern of the curved padded headboard and bedskirt with the white bed linens creates a serene retreat. The second floor bedrooms are separated by the upper volume of the living room for privacy and share a small sitting area open to the stairs and the living room below.

Cooke’s Hope is one of the most popular neighborhoods along the sought after Easton-Oxford corridor and this traditionally styled house would be a great place to call home.

 

For more information about this property contact Janet Larson with Benson and Mangold at 410-822-6665 (o), 410-310-1797 (c) or jlarson@bensonandmangold.com, Equal Housing Opportunity”.

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

House of the Week: Winsome Winton

I know this house well as I had it under contract when I moved from Pittsburgh in 2004. Unfortunately, the buyer for my Pittsburgh house was not able to obtain financing so I had to reluctantly withdraw my offer for this charming bungalow. Even after fifteen years, all the features that first attracted me to the property are even better. The corner lot’s landscaping has grown taller and broadened out to provide privacy for the side yard and the front porch that is partially screened.  All the Craftsman style details were unaltered-the wide shed dormer at the front elevation, the arrangement of rooms, the narrow French doors on either side of the fireplace, the wood stair balustrade, the beautiful wood floors, trim and period doors. In 2004, I had a sheltie and the rear fenced yard would have been the perfect spot for her to enjoy being outdoors under plenty of shade from the mature trees while I gardened. The French door from the deck would have provided quick access for that last walk before bedtime.

The main floor plan is typical of early 20th century bungalows. The front door opens onto the living room that spans the full length of the house with the stair to the second floor at one side for flexible furniture arrangement.  Behind the living room what was probably the original dining room is currently used as a TV room next to the kitchen. Stairs from the kitchen lead to the deck at the rear yard and then to the basement. Behind the dining room and the kitchen is the original sunroom that is currently a roomy office and a powder room. Narrow half-French doors on either side of the brick fireplace lead to the screened portion of the wrap-around porch. The stair leads to a center hall on the second floor with a large bath and two bedrooms.  The rear bedroom connects to a room that could become a dressing room or office.

Two of the five houses I have called home so far have been bungalows; I simply can’t resist their quirky charm. This bungalow on its corner lot, landscaping for privacy, rear yard with terrace under mature trees and plantings, porches and great floor plan is irresistible too-someone else agrees for this bungalow is under contract. Once again, I missed my chance!

For more information about this property, contact Meg Moran, GRI, with Long and Foster Real Estate-Christies International Real Estate at 410-770-3600 (o), 410-310-2209 (c), or megmoran007@gmail.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity”.

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Spy House of the Week: Mt. Misery

It is always a special pleasure to feature one of Talbot County’s historic residences. The pedigree of this distinctive residence is indeed historic for Mt. Misery was built on land granted by Lord Baltimore in 1667. Richard and Mary Harrington were deeded the house and its forty-one acres of land in 1731 and the house remained in the Harrington family for another seventy-five years. Most local historians believe that Edward Covey built the brick house now on the property between 1805 or 1806. After his death, ownership the house passed to his daughter.

Subsequent years of neglect ended in 1954 when new owners, Philadelphia Industrialist Richard Tennant and his wife, retained Dr Chandlee Forman to conduct an extensive restoration and preservation of the house. Great care was taken to preserve the original features and details including original pine floors, mantels in the original main wing, wood burning fireplaces, paneled doors and trim. In 2004, the current owners further expanded and upgraded the house with the same degree of care. Plans by Paul Richard, A.I.A. included large modern bathrooms and closets along with the garages, ground floor guest suite and stables. Landscape design by Barbara Paca, Ph. D., O.B.E. of Preservation Green, added flowering shrubs, patios and pergolas to define garden “rooms”, including, not surprisingly, a Rose Garden. Trails to explore the woodland park and stream and outdoor amenities of a pool, sauna and tennis court completed the design.

Mt. Misery’s is now surrounded by four acres but mature landscaping provides this country oasis privacy from the other houses along the road. A short gravel drive framed by dense walls of hedges leads to the two and one half story tall house and a smaller wing that telescopes down to contain the kitchen and support spaces. Both wings are faced with Flemish bond brick with a cedar shake roof.

The center door opens into one parlor with a wood burning fireplace and original winding stairs to the second floor. A wide doorway leads to another parlor with its fireplace and winding stairs to the second floor. A beautiful original deep wood threshold transitions the main wing down to the kitchen wing. The original large kitchen fireplace is now the focal point for the owner’s work area. Beyond is the kitchen with light wood cabinets with glass fronts and stainless steel appliances. Adjacent to the kitchen is the dining area with a sloped bead board ceiling and French doors leading to the terrace and the water beyond.

Above the main wing is a suite containing a bedroom and sitting area. Guest bedrooms above the secondary wing have a variety of ceiling planes and dormer windows at the front elevation. A full length low shed dormer at the rear is lined with windows for water views.

Between the kitchen wing is a breezeway to the garage and the guest suite. I loved the guest suite with its bay window in the bedroom overlooking a private brick terrace surrounded by lattice walls. The wood floors, wood antiques and white linens create a restful retreat.

The next stewards of this classic Eastern Shore house and grounds in a setting carefully landscaped for privacy is a unique opportunity to enjoy a careful blend of historic details with the modern upgrades and conveniences that Mt. Misery offers.

 

For more information about this property, contact Bob Shanahan with Shoreline Realty, Inc, at 410-822-7556 (o) 410-310-5745 (c) or bob@shorelinerealty.biz, “Equal Housing Opportunity”. Photography by Near and Far Media and Bob Shanahan

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Spy House of the Week: Tilghman Island Treasure

When I drove up to this house for a preview, the site, landscape and architecture were pitch perfect. The main house, circa 1890, was built by John B. Harrison for his daughter. Mr. Harrison was also a renowned boat builder of log canoes and skipjacks including the Edna Lockwood. Renovations in 2002 updated the house including the exterior deep taupe shake siding with crisp white trim around the 6/1 windows. The front elevation telescopes slightly down and the corner board of the main wing breaks up the massing. To the left of the house is the parking area with a high fence that blocks the pool behind from the street. Pink roses were in bloom along the top of the fence that was detailed in the same taupe siding and white trim as the main house. A low white fence marks the property line at the street and two tall crepe myrtles flank the flagstone walk to the front door with its half sidelights and a transom. When I opened the door, I eagerly anticipated beautiful interiors and I was not disappointed.

The living room with a side stairway to the second floor spans the front of the main wing Clearly a homeowner with discriminating taste created the beautiful interiors beginning with the living room’s bright red walls, white trim, built-in millwork on the interior wall and gleaming original wood floors. The glass topped coffee table and side table enabled the beauty of the patterned rug to be fully appreciated. A mix of upholstered and rattan pieces, the cushioned window seat by the fireplace and the wood accent table created a cozy space for reading by the fire. I especially liked the window frames painted black instead of white for a deft accent.

Beyond the living room are the dining room, kitchen, butler pantry and storage room. The dining room accesses the rear screened porch and the side deck for a variety of dining options. The high window at the side wall of the dining room and the high backed settee below, the oval wood table and Windsor chair defines the dining area. Additional seating allows guests to keep the cook company. I loved the kitchen with its black cabinetry, the light aqua of the walls and the island, the high trio of windows over the range and open shelving instead of upper cabinets. I coveted the adjacent pantry with its ample storage.

The rear of the house has a large family room and a screened porch. A wall of sliding doors connects the family room to the pool area for a seamless indoor-outdoor space. The screened porch with its rattan furnishings is the perfect spot to escape from the summer sun after a dip in the pool or an outing on the water.

The second floor sumptuous master suite has a corner seating area with wrap-around windows and a French door that leads to the deck for water views, a spacious dressing room with a window for daylight and the master bath with both a soaking tub and shower. I would gladly be a guest and be given the waterside bedroom with its two rear closets that creates a seating area. Deep teal rattan and patterned cushions would be a cozy space for relaxing.

This property also has a guest house that is a separate parcel. The main floor has two bedrooms, a bath and a family room at the rear for water views. The second floor is an open plan with kitchen, dining and living areas. The second floor deck creates a covered porch for the main floor for a variety of outdoor rooms. The house and guest house make a terrific multi-generational compound, or the potential for selling the guest house in the future is an intriguing bonus.

All of the elevations are equally appealing and the interiors are outstanding. The use of color on the walls, the inspired accent touch of black window frames, the mix of furnishings, accessories and art combine to make an irresistible home. I spent twice the time at this preview than I normally do because I wanted to linger and enjoy the interiors. Bravo!

 

Interior design by the owners and designers Stephen Obrien and Eileen Deymier. For details about this property, contact Kelly Showell with Benson & Mangold, LLC at 410-822-1415 (o), 410-829-5468 (c) or kshowell1958@gmail.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity.”

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

House of the Week: Victorian Charm on Water Street

In her book, ”Historic St. Michaels, An Architectural History”, author Elizabeth Hughes documents fourteen  of the houses on Water Street as worthy of mention, including this distinctive house at number 412, the Walter A. Fairbanks House.  This house incorporates many details of the Victorian style such as its asymmetrical “L” shape, the turned post porch columns, fretwork and single -story bay window. Remarkably, the only design changes to the front elevation visible from Water Street are the addition of two dormers on the roof and the replacement of an attic vent with a decorative window. Current day buyers would appreciate the luxury of the two-car garage, a treasured amenity in the Historic District, especially during the summer tourist season.

The floor plan works very well-the entrance hall is between the front sitting room and the family room.  The dining room is connected to the living room making great spaces for relaxing with family or entertaining friends.  The vista from the entrance hall is through the wrap-around windows at the breakfast room to the screened porch and the rear yard. The kitchen, laundry room and pergola covered walkway to the two-car garage completes the ground floor.

The full front deep screened porch with its Victorian fretwork detailing is a great place for relaxing. The wood slat ceiling and wood floors add warmth and charm. I loved the living room with its bay window and furniture grouped around the fireplace. Windows on each side bring additional daylight. The focal point of the family room is the fireplace with millwork on either side for books and family memorabilia. The double circular mirrors echo the abstract art with circular elements. The dining room with another fireplace and its contemporary furnishings and more abstract art continues the interior design scheme. I loved the sleek galley kitchen with its cozy breakfast space surrounded by windows for views to the rear yard. Direct access to the screened porch creates another warm weather living/dining room.

The second floor bedrooms were quite spacious and I think the rear bedroom and  the rear dressing room that connects to one of the bathrooms creates a wonderful suite. The dressing room also has its own stair down to the kitchen area. The attic with its windows on three sides is a blank canvas for myriad uses.

A wonderfully preserved piece of St. Michaels’ architectural history with the best of Victorian details, great updates for today’s lifestyle, wonderful floor plan with appealing vistas, high ceilings with many tall windows for daylight and the bonus of a two-car garage in the heart of the Historic District- how could one resist?

 

For more information about this property, contact Cornelia Heckenbach at Long and Foster Real Estate Inc., 410-745-0283 (o), 410-310-1229 (c) or info@corneliaheckenbach.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity”.

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

House of the Week: Where Michener Slept on Broad Creek

Being a history buff, I especially enjoy writing about houses with an interesting past. The Sellers told me they learned at their closing of their property that it had been christened “Traders’ Point” since traders traveled up Broad Creek to unload their shipments in earlier days.  Its most recent history is even more interesting since the Sellers also learned “Traders Point” had been a rental house and that James Michener stayed there while he was working on his master work “Chesapeake,”required reading for Eastern Shore residents.

On the day I visited, I drove down a gravel road that meandered through the woods with my windows down to enjoy the sounds of nature.  Late afternoon sunlight filtered through the trees and serene vistas changed from water, meadows and woodland around every turn. By the time I arrived at the house, all the day’s stress had dissipated and I was immediately captivated by the property.  I walked around the house and the panoramic views of the shoreline with very little trees to obstruct the water views was a very pleasant surprise.

The one and a half story house, detached large shed and detached garage are located very close to the water, a sought after siting that is no longer possible today with the Critical Area requirements. The Cape Cod Cottage style architecture tied the three buildings together in a very appealing composition. I especially liked the two elevations that faced the water-the side elevation had a center brick chimney flanked by pairs of French doors on each side and an octagonal accent window on the second floor. The long side has a shed roof that extends from the main roof to create an offset bay from the living room to the dining room that breaks up the large open plan and creates a covered porch off the dining room and rooftop deck above.

The entry door opens to a large room defined by the kitchen, sitting and dining areas.  Even though the day was overcast, the rooms had daylight from windows on multiple walls. I especially liked the sitting and dining areas with the color palette of slate blue and cream of the rugs, upholstered furnishings grouped around the fireplace and the accessories.  Older wood distressed finish pieces like the cupboard in the kitchen with a colorful collection of fish and crab ceramic pieces and the storage bench at the door were delightful accents and gave the house great personality.

The rest of the main floor contains a corner bedroom with double windows on two sides and a bath. The stairs to the second floor has built-in shelves with interesting collectables including wood figurines of Tweedledum and Tweedledee and several birdhouses. The second floor has a large bedroom with sloped ceilings, the octagonal accent window and French doors to a rooftop deck. Another bedroom and bath completes the floor plan.

This house works so well for a family with master suites on both floors but also has great potential for modifications.  If one wanted a larger main floor bedroom, the rear wall could be extended with wrap-around windows for a panoramic view of the landscape and water. The shed could become a screened pavilion for warm weather crab feasts or could be finished for all-season use by adding rows of windows that would increase its vistas to the water.  It could even be moved back to conform to Critical Area setbacks and connected to the main house.

Fantastic site, seventeen acres of privacy, two-thousand feet of water frontage on Broad Creek, a charming cottage that could easily be expanded, a large shed that has rough-in electrical and plumbing ready for its transformation, proximity to St. Michaels restaurants-what more does one need?  I’m buying my lottery ticket this week!

 

For more information about this property, contact Cliff Meredith with Meredith Fine Properties at 410-822-6272 (o) 410-924-0082 (c), or mre@goeaston.net, “Equal Housing Opportunity.”

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

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