Compass Regional Hospice Celebrates ‘Champion’ Legislators and Corporate Leaders

Compass Regional Hospice and Grief Support Programs, serving Queen Anne’s, Kent and Caroline counties, hosted its “Celebrating Champion Legislators and Corporate Leadership Breakfast and Briefing” on Thursday, May 10, at Annie’s Paramount Steak and Seafood House in Grasonville. This was the organization’s first official briefing of its elected officials, business leaders and community guests from the three Mid-Shore counties it serves.

Sen. Stephen Hershey, R-36-Upper Shore; Del. Jeff Ghrist, R-36-Caroline; Del. Steve Arentz, R-36-Queen Anne’s; Del. Jay Jacobs, R-36-Kent; and Queen Anne’s County Commissioners Jim Moran and Jack Wilson attended the breakfast, where Compass Regional Hospice staff and members of its board of directors had the chance to say ‘thank you’ for a job well done during the legislative session this past winter, and for helping the organization to secure state funding, additional funds from the governor’s capital budget and Queen Anne’s County funding.

After a welcome from Compass Regional Hospice Board Chairman Tom Helfenbein, Heather Guerieri, executive director, Compass Regional Hospice; and president of the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization, briefed guests on “The Changing Landscape of Hospice and Palliative Care,” including its impact on health care costs to businesses and their employees.

“We are celebrating some historic milestones for our organization, that have been made possible thanks to the extraordinary support of our special guests and District 36 champions,” Guerieri said. “We’ve been providing hospice care in the region for 33 years, and many of you are partners and supporters of our work.”

Guerieri said the landscape of hospice care has been evolving in the past 10 years.

“Hospice is not a ‘place,’ and should not be referred to as a ‘death sentence,’” Guerieri said. “It’s a very caring and successful model of comfort care that can begin at the onset of a life-limiting diagnosis and continue through to a patient’s final days and moments of life. The spectrum of care reaches the patient, their loved ones and a patient’s caregivers.”

She said care can take place “in the comfort of one’s home, in an assisted living or nursing home environment, or in the more supervised patient care setting of a hospice facility,” like the ones Compass
Regional Hospice operates in Centreville, Chestertown and Denton.

Those providing care range from certified nursing assistants and registered nurse practitioners, to social workers, grief counselors and a wide range of volunteers, including those specific to veterans’ needs and those who are referred to as “vigil volunteers”—a volunteer who is present during the last days of a patient’s life.

Compass Regional Hospice takes care of infants and children, as well as adults in need of its programs, and patients are never turned away based on an inability to pay for services. Because of this, Guerieri said there is a $1.4 million funding gap between what the organization receives in service payments and the actual cost of care provided.

“Our daily census — the number of patients we are serving daily — is close to 100, and will continue to grow, especially as the elderly community grows, with more retirees moving to the Eastern Shore,” Guerieri said.

She said the organization is in the middle of its capital campaign, “Our Journey, Together,” and part of the $5 million campaign includes critical renovations and an expansion for the Compass Regional Hospice – Hospice Center in Centreville. The expansion will grow the facility from a six-bed facility to a 10-bed facility.

In addition to hospice patient care, Compass Regional Hospice also runs grief support programs.

“One of the most critical programs we run in order to serve the community is our grief support programs,” said Kathy Deoudes, emeritus board chairman.

Rhonda Knotts, director of grief services at Compass Regional Hospice, said loss is not solely about death, but about any type of loss, including those pertaining to relationships, independence, traumatic experiences and financial stability.

“About 15 percent of those who are grieving are also struggling with a mental health diagnosis. This can make their symptoms of grief much more severe,” Knotts said. “Through our grief support programs, we strive every day to normalize the feelings of those who are grieving and help them get on the path to a healthier healing.”

In addition to specialized support groups, Compass Regional Hospice also offers one-on-one sessions and healing workshops, all at no cost to those who need them.

Hershey and Ghrist gave a “shout out” to Gov. Larry Hogan for making funding for hospice care a priority during the legislative session, and Jacobs said he supported Compass Regional Hospice’s comfort of those who are grieving and dying. Arentz said hospice care on the Eastern Shore is a priority.

“It’s easy to get behind a need, and this is a need,” he said.

To learn more about Compass Regional Hospice, how you can donate or for volunteer opportunities, call 443-262-4100 or visit compassregionalhospice.org.

Compass Regional Hospice – Care on your terms

Compass Regional Hospice is a fully licensed, independent, community-based nonprofit organization certified by Medicare and the state of Maryland and accredited by the Joint Commission. Since 1985, Compass Regional Hospice has been dedicated to supporting people of all ages through the challenge of living with a life-limiting illness and learning to live following the death of a loved one. Today, the organization is a regional provider of hospice care and grief support in Queen Anne’s, Kent and Caroline counties. “Care on your terms” is the promise that guides staff and volunteers as they care for patients in private residences, nursing homes, assisted living facilities and the residential hospice centers in Centreville, Chestertown and Denton. Grief support services are offered to children, adults and families of patients who died under hospice care, as well as members of the community who are grieving the loss of a loved one, through The Hope & Healing Center. For more information about Compass Regional Hospice, visit compassregionalhospice.org.

Compass Regional Hospice Partners with ‘We Honor Veterans’

Alvin Abend of Chestertown, a retired sergeant with the United States Air Force, recently was honored during a Veterans Recognition Ceremony at Compass Regional Hospice.

Compass Regional Hospice is a national partner of “We Honor Veterans,” a campaign developed by the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization, in collaboration with the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Alvin Abend

Compass Regional Hospice honors all hospice patients who have served in the military with a special ceremony. Each honoree is presented with a pin, framed certificate, tabletop flag and a patriotic lap quilt made by volunteers. For veterans admitted to the hospice center, an American flag and the flag of the veteran’s branch of the service are posted on either side of the door to the patient’s room.

Trained staff and volunteers provide veterans and their families with local resources surrounding veteran end-of-life experiences, benefits and other ongoing projects to recognize the dedication of these heroes.

“Many of our veterans were not appropriately thanked for their service and dedication to our country, regardless of their level of involvement,” said Courtney Williams, manager of volunteer and professional services with Compass Regional Hospice. “Even if it is the first time they have heard someone say ‘thank you,’ it is important to everyone in our organization that we take the time to honor their service.”

Compass Regional Hospice enrolled in the program in 2012. In 2017, Compass Regional Hospice was awarded the “We Honor Veterans” partner level four distinction—the highest level an organization can reach. To achieve this distinction, a hospice center must provide ongoing veteran-centric education for staff and volunteers, build organizational capacity to provide quality care for veterans, and develop and strengthen relationships with VA medical centers and other veteran organizations.

“Our vets are a special population of our patients that require specialized care due to the experiences they have had in the military,” Williams said. “Through this program, we have reached level four by continuing to improve the care we provide to veterans and partnering with our community to ensure they receive the care they deserve.”

Through the “We Honor Veterans” program, Compass Regional Hospice gratefully acknowledges its military and service men, women and families. The mission of the program is to serve the nation’s veterans, who have served their country so selflessly, during their end-of-life journey.

As a veteran-centric organization, Compass Regional Hospice also provides a Vet-to-Vet program, which aims to pair veteran volunteers with veteran hospice patients. These hospice-trained volunteers, with personal military experience, have the unique ability to relate and connect with veteran patients and their families.

“Having volunteers with personal experience in the armed forces helps them to relate on a different level with our veteran patients. We are lucky to offer Vet-to-Vet volunteers to the patients we serve, so they have the opportunity of camaraderie,” Williams said.

Abend joined the Air Force in January 1964, eventually serving as a helicopter mechanic during the Vietnam War. Already a member of the U.S. Armed Forces stationed in Texas, he recalled the day he went to volunteer to serve in Vietnam.

“We went to go volunteer (for Vietnam), and the guy said, ‘What’s your name?’ And I told him. (The officer said,) ‘You don’t have to volunteer. Your number’s up,” Abend recalled, saying his number was about to be called because of the draft, which was being employed by the federal government of the United States at the time to fill vacancies that were not able to be filled by voluntary means.

Once overseas, Abend was stationed in Udorn, Thailand, and was part of helicopter rescue missions for stranded U.S. troops along the Ho Chi Minh trail, a logistical system of mountain and jungle paths that ran through the Democratic Republic of Vietnam, the Republic of Vietnam, as well as through Laos and Cambodia. The trail was controlled by North Vietnam, and the Viet Cong used the trail to infiltrate troops and supplies on their way to South Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia.

“If they were blowing up the trail and (U.S. troops) got hurt, then we would try to get (our men out),” Abend said. “The idea was to get them out, and (we) were quite successful, actually.”

Abend’s four-year service ended December 1967, and he returned home to Maryland, where he worked as a firefighter and ambulance driver for the City of Bowie. He also has worked in construction and drove tractor-trailers, hauling gasoline.

Originally from Gambrills, after leaving Bowie, Abend moved to Kent County with his wife, Margaret Founds.

“Our involvement in the ‘We Honor Veterans’ program has been so meaningful. We have been told by our veteran patients and their families many times that we are the first people that have ever recognized their service and honored them,” said Heather Guerieri, executive director, Compass Regional Hospice.“The recognition ceremony is very touching— to be able to honor our veteran patients before they die, and to give them the recognition they deserve.”

To learn more about the “We Honor Veterans” program with Compass Regional Hospice or to volunteer with the Vet-to-Vet program through the organization, contact Williams at 443-262-4112 orcwilliams@compassregionalhospice.org, or visit compassregionalhospice.org/volunteers.

Compass Regional Hospice – Care on your terms

Compass Regional Hospice is a fully licensed, independent, community-based nonprofit organization certified by Medicare and the state of Maryland and accredited by the Joint Commission. Since 1985, Compass Regional Hospice has been dedicated to supporting people of all ages through the challenge of living with a life-limiting illness and learning to live following the death of a loved one. Today, the organization is a regional provider of hospice care and grief support in Queen Anne’s, Kent and Caroline counties. “Care on your terms” is the promise that guides staff and volunteers as they care for patients in private residences, nursing homes, assisted living facilities and the residential hospice centers in Centreville, Chestertown and Denton.Grief support services are offered to children, adults and families of patients who died under hospice care, as well as members of the community who are grieving the loss of a loved one through The Hope and Healing Center. For more information about Compass Regional Hospice, visit compassregionalhospice.org.

Whitby Memorial Golf Tourney Raises Funds for Prostate Cancer Treatment

David Whitby Memorial Golf Tournament founders Gary and Janet Wright.

The 10th annual David Whitby Memorial Golf Tournament, held at the River Marsh Golf Club in Cambridge on May 14, benefited programs and patients of the Cancer Center at UM Shore Regional Health.

Founded by Gary and Janet Wright 10 years ago after Janet’s brother, David Whitby, died from prostate cancer, the tournament is an important source of funding for prostate cancer awareness and screening programs as well as patient care. Brian Leutner, executive director, Oncology Services, describes the value of the tournament proceeds as immensely important.

“The tournament proceeds have funded our prostate screening events that are offered every year in September where we partner with the local urologists,” says Leutner. “These funds benefit our UM SRH ‘US TOO’ prostate cancer support group, which features guest speakers who are experts on the latest clinical trials, treatment protocols and strategies for managing prostate cancer and the effects of treatment. The David Whitby Memorial Fund at UM Memorial Hospital Foundation also has supported recent technology upgrades allowing for more precise treatments for our prostate cancer patients receiving radiation therapy. The entire staff of our Shore Regional Cancer Program would like to thank the Wrights, the tournament committee and Memorial Hospital Foundation for their continued support of our prostate cancer patients in our community.”

Thomas Sisca, clinical pharmacist and anti-thrombosis specialist, Gary Bigelow, regional director, Radiology and Kevin Chapple, regional director, Pharmacy were among the UM Shore Regional Health team members who participated in the tournament.

Adds F. Graham Lee, vice president of philanthropy for UM SRH, “Cancer of the prostate is one of the most commonly occurring cancers in men in the United States. The funds raised by those who organize and participate in the Whitby Tournament over the years have helped to purchase equipment, provide screenings and ultimately, to save lives.”

To support the David Whitby Memorial Prostate Cancer Fund, please call 410-822-1000, extension 5763.

About UM Shore Regional Health: As part of the University of Maryland Medical System (UMMS), University of Maryland Shore Regional Health is the principal provider of comprehensive health care services for more than 170,000 residents of Caroline, Dorchester, Kent, Queen Anne’s and Talbot counties on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. UM Shore Regional Health’s team of more than 2,600 employees, medical staff, board members and volunteers work with various community partners to fulfill the organization’s mission of Creating Healthier Communities Together.

Hayman Promoted to Director of Clinical Services at Compass Regional Hospice

Dr. Holly Hayman, DNP, RN, CHPN, of Greensboro has been promoted to Director of Clinical Services at Compass Regional Hospice, which offers individuals, families and the community “Care on your terms” through comprehensive, professional and compassionate end-of-life care and grief support, serving Queen Anne’s, Kent and Caroline counties.

“We are so excited to announce the promotion of Dr. Holly Hayman to Director of Clinical Services,” said Heather Guerieri, executive director, Compass Regional Hospice. “Holly has been a longtime employee of Compass Regional Hospice and has held many roles, with many years of hospice and palliative care experience. As we have grown, her vision for restructuring our clinical operations is just the direction Compass Regional Hospice needs. As part of the senior leadership team, she will help me strategize to ensure Compass Regional Hospice continues to be the best in the industry and continues to be forward-thinking.”

As Director of Clinical Services, Hayman will be responsible for the coordination of direct and indirect patient services provided by all clinical staff, including home health aides and nurses, and their support staff. In addition to coordinating care, Hayman will assign clinical staff to patients; provide guidance and counseling to all clinical staff to assist them in providing top-of-the-line hospice care services to Compass Regional Hospice patients; and assist clinicians in establishing immediate and long-term therapeutic care, setting priorities for care and developing plans of care. She also will help to promote hospice care within the community; will receive referrals for Compass Regional Hospice’s hospice and Bridges programs; and will maintain clinical records and supply inventories for patient services.“We are so excited to announce the promotion of Dr. Holly Hayman to Director of Clinical Services,” said Heather Guerieri, executive director, Compass Regional Hospice. “Holly has been a longtime employee of Compass Regional Hospice and has held many roles, with many years of hospice and palliative care experience. As we have grown, her vision for restructuring our clinical operations is just the direction Compass Regional Hospice needs. As part of the senior leadership team, she will help me strategize to ensure Compass Regional Hospice continues to be the best in the industry and continues to be forward-thinking.”

“I will guide the clinical department, so we can provide the quality end-of-life care we are known for,” Hayman said. “I’m thrilled to be a part of such an excellent organization that provides compassionate care at the end of life. I think there is a lot of good the organization can do out in the community, and that we’ve been working on out in the community, so it’s going to be good to be able to continue that, as well.”

Hayman was promoted from the position of Director of Compliance and Education. Hayman will incorporate responsibilities she has held under the position of Director of Compliance and Education into her new role as Director of Clinical Services. Those responsibilities will include reviewing, revising and implementing policies and procedures to maintain compliance with local, state and federal regulations regarding licensure and certification of hospice personnel; ensuring compliance with Medicare regulations and Joint Commission standards; and integrating ethical principles into all aspects of hospice care practice.

Hayman said a large part of her role as Director of Compliance and Education was collaborating with others on the local and state level about hospice professional development, and her new role will continue ensure staff are offered opportunities to grow and succeed about continuing education in the hospice field. She also will continue to hire and orient all new clinical staff.

This restructuring will help Compass Regional Hospice and its clinical staff during its growth to continue to deliver the best “Care on your terms” to its patients, as well as their families and caregivers.

“Our goal, to have these clinical and educational components tied together and working well as a team, is that we will be continuing to provide the high quality of care that Compass Regional Hospice so embraces,” Hayman said. “We see the importance of the regulatory guidelines — guidelines that help us navigate, and which serve as the groundwork for what hospice truly is. Everything is important — there truly is a link between all our departments — and this restructuring will help us to streamline this communication process, which in turn will help us to better serve our community.”

Hayman received her Doctor of Nursing Practice from Salisbury University, where she received her diploma on May 23. She defended her dissertation, completed at Compass Regional Hospice, on “The Symptom Management Protocol and Hospice Nurse Educational Intervention in Proof Management of Exacerbated Symptoms.”

“The project not only helped Compass Regional Hospice, but it also helps the hospice and palliative care world,” Hayman said.

She began her nursing career in 2006, working in telemetry and public health. She began at Hospice of Queen Anne’s, now Compass Regional Health, in 2011, as a case managing nurse. In 2013, she left Compass to teach nursing students full-time at Chesapeake College in Wye Mills, while staying on with Compass Regional Hospice as an alternative nursing resource, when needed. She came back to Compass Regional Hospice full-time summer 2017 as a clinical educator. As Compass Regional Hospice grew, and in her role as Clinical Educator, she took on more responsibilities and she was offered the position of Director of Compliance and Education.

“We found that, because education is tied so tightly to quality, and with all of the changes in the regulations that were and are occurring, we really needed someone who could direct the quality and chart auditing, and the reporting to Medicare, that all hospice agencies are required to comply with, in addition to complying with all other regulatory areas,” Hayman said.

Looking forward, Compass Regional Hospice is continuing to grow, and is seeking a clinical field manager, clinical team leaders, an admissions nurse and additional nurses and certified nursing assistants to assist with a growing need for hospice care in the communities the organization serves — Queen Anne’s, Kent and Caroline counties.

Compass Regional Hospice – Care on your terms

Compass Regional Hospice is a fully licensed, independent, community-based nonprofit organization certified by Medicare and the state of Maryland and accredited by the Joint Commission. Since 1985, Compass Regional Hospice has been dedicated to supporting people of all ages through the challenge of living with a life-limiting illness and learning to live following the death of a loved one. Today, the organization is a regional provider of hospice care and grief support in Queen Anne’s, Kent and Caroline counties. “Care on your terms” is the promise that guides staff and volunteers as they care for patients in private residences, nursing homes, assisted living facilities and the residential hospice centers in Centreville, Chestertown and Denton. Grief support services are offered to children, adults and families of patients who died under hospice care, as well as members of the community who are grieving the loss of a loved one, through The Hope and Healing Center. For more information about Compass Regional Hospice, visit compassregionalhospice.org.

Leadership with a Twist of Yoga Training at Evergreen Easton Point

Shar McBee

Leadership and yoga.  What do they have in common?  “Everything,” says Shar McBee, best-selling author of To Lead is to Serve and Joy of Leadership.

“In Sanskrit, the word ‘yoga’ means union. In the West we’ve come to think of yoga as just the physical postures.  Exercise.  But it is much more than that,” McBee says, “In the simplest form, yoga unites your mind, your body and your emotions.  Forward bends are relaxing and calm your nerves.  Backbends are invigorating.  Twists increase flexibility and make you more open-minded.”

Wouldn’t that be helpful to you in a leadership position?  “Yes!” says Freya Farley, the Executive Director and Chair of the Board of Evergreen Easton Point, “Which is why Evergreen will be the first organization in Maryland to offer this brand-new workshop.”

Freya Farley is a lifelong yoga practitioner.  Shar McBee lives in Beverly Hills, California and conducts these trainings for tech companies, “But you may remember her for organizing three sold-out Leadership for Women Conferences in Easton,” says Farley.

“In this workshop participants will learn leadership principles and a few yoga poses that will add strength and flexibility to your mind, body and career,” says Farley.  No previous experience with yoga is required.

Curious?  Watch McBee speaking at 20th Century Fox Movie Studios: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wCbIduHfb1o

When:  Wednesday, June 13, 2018, 7pm – 9:30pm

Where:  Evergreen Easton Point

What:   Leadership Training with a Twist of Yoga

Register:  http://evergreeneaston.org/program-schedule-classes-events-workshops/classes/leadership-training-with-a-twist-of-yoga/

Questions? Contact Freya: office@evergreeneaston.org

SharMcBee is the best-selling author of To Lead is to Serve and Joy of Leadership who has taught leadership worldwide and all over the USA.  She lives in Beverly Hills, California but you may remember her from the three Leadership for Women Conferences that she organized in Easton.

Freya Farley is the Executive Director and Chair of the Board of Evergreen.  Freya is a lifelong yoga practitioner and noted acupuncturist who specializes in Women’s Health and Fertility Treatments.  Restoring balance has been her guiding principle both in leadership and in health.  Evergreen is a non-profit health & wellness advocacy organization located in Easton, MD: www.evergreeneastonorg

Compass Regional Hospice Staff to Provide Counseling at Vietnam Traveling Memorial Wall

Compass Regional Hospice’s Grief and Support Services staff have been invited to be present during the Vietnam Traveling Memorial Wall’s stay in Easton, which will take place from Thursday, May 31, to Wednesday, June 6.

Compass Regional Hospice’s trained grief counselors, as well as a social worker and a chaplain, will be on hand to provide counseling services to those who seek them, from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.Monday, June 4, through Wednesday, June 6.

Grief Services staff will include Rhonda Knotts, grief counselor and supervisor of Grief Services with Compass Regional Hospice, who is certified in level-two advanced trauma treatment through The Ferentz Institute; Wayne Larrimore, a grief counselor with Compass Regional Hospice, who served with the U.S. Air Force for 21 years; Ann OConnor, a grief counselor with Compass Regional Hospice; social worker Sharon Loving; and Compass chaplain Nancy Greenwell.

From left, clockwise: Rhonda Knotts, grief counselor and supervisor of Grief Services; Linda Turner, grief counselor; Wayne Larrimore, grief counselor and Air Force veteran; and Ann OConnor, grief counselor.

“Ultimately, what our counselors can offer, is a compassionate ear,” Knotts said. “We are definitely not there to think that we can fix anything or to erase what has already been seen and felt, but just to be a source of comfort while you visit, remember, and in many instances, take a trip back. We’re going in because we owe it to our veterans for what they have done for us— to be there and walk with them when they need us to.”

Jackie Davis, executive director of the Mental Health Association of the Eastern Shore, said the planning committee bringing the Vietnam Traveling Memorial Wall to Easton is anticipating thousands of visitors. She said because of the strong and often still raw emotional reactions the Vietnam Wall in Washington, D.C., can evoke, she knew there might be times where visitors to the traveling wall may need someone to talk with. She said the most important criteria was that those people be trained to provide that listening ear. The MHAMDES is coordinating the efforts to bring that trained staff to the Vietnam Traveling Memorial Wall during its visit in Easton.

“It adds another level of support,” Davis said. “I just want to emphasize how thankful we are to Compass Regional Hospice, whose staff are taking up almost half of the hours (of the counseling needs). We didn’t know what to expect (when planning the event), but we’d rather be over-prepared than under-prepared.”

Social worker Sharon Loving, and Compass Regional Hospice chaplain Nancy Greenwell.

Davis said Compass Regional Hospice is one of the only Mid-Shore nonprofit agencies to provide trained grief counseling services during the event. Other agencies providing counseling services include the Salisbury Outstation of the Department of Veterans Affairs, which will be providing its mobile crisis van that includes counseling rooms, a full-time counselor and several support staff, which will be available 24/7; Eastern Shore Mobile Crisis Services, which will provide overnight on-call services; Maryland Responds Medical Reserve Corps; and several trained individual counselors who have volunteered their time.

According to a news release from E.E. Streets Memorial Post 5118, the mission of the Vietnam Traveling Wall is to honor United States service men and women who gave the ultimate sacrifice during the Vietnam War, by bringing a 3/5 replica of the original monument in Washington, D.C., to VFW Post 5118, 355 Glebe Road, Easton.

“This is so that the family and friends of those memorialized on the Wall, along with everyone on the Eastern Shore, can experience the overwhelming impact of this memorial,” the news release stated. “The event is a solemn presentation of the Vietnam Wall Memorial, and as such will have an air of reverence, honor, and respect.”

Counselors from all agencies involved will be present in shifts, from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., June 1 through 5.

The Wall will be open 24-hours a day, daily, during its time in Easton. The Vietnam Traveling Memorial Wall stands as a reminder of the more than nine million military personnel who served on active duty during the Vietnam Era, the 2,709,918 Americans who served in Vietnam and especially those who gave the ultimate sacrifice— those who lost their lives serving the United States during the war.

There are 58,315 names on the Wall. Of those names, 208 listed their hometowns as being on the Delmarva Peninsula. Of the 2,709,918 Americans who served in Vietnam, less than 850,000 are estimated to be alive today.

Throughout the Wall’s stay in Easton, volunteers will read the 58, 315 names aloud. The wall will be escorted into Easton via motorcycle motorcade on May 31. Opening ceremonies will begin at 6 p.m. June 1. A schedule of events can be found on Facebook at “Vietnam Traveling Wall Easton Maryland.” During the Wall’s time in Easton, each Mid-Shore county will be represented during special recognition ceremonies to honor those service men and women who lost their lives.

For more information about grief services provided by Compass Regional Hospice, call 443-262-4100. For more information about counseling services provided at the Wall, call Jackie Davis at the Mental Health Association of the Eastern Shore at 410-822-0444 or email her at jdavis@mhamdes.org.

For more information about the Vietnam Traveling Memorial Wall’s stay in Easton, contact VFW 5118 board members Kenley Timms at kenleyt@goeaston.net, Royce Ball at royceball@mac.com or Gene Feher at genejfeher@gmail.com.

Compass Regional Hospice – Care on your terms

Compass Regional Hospice is a fully licensed, independent, community-based nonprofit organization certified by Medicare and the state of Maryland and accredited by the Joint Commission. Since 1985, Compass Regional Hospice has been dedicated to supporting people of all ages through the challenge of living with a life-limiting illness and learning to live following the death of a loved one. Today, the organization is a regional provider of hospice care and grief support in Queen Anne’s, Kent and Caroline counties. “Care on your terms” is the promise that guides staff and volunteers as they care for patients in private residences, nursing homes, assisted living facilities and the residential hospice centers in Centreville, Chestertown and Denton. Grief support services are offered to children, adults and families of patients who died under hospice care, as well as members of the community who are grieving the loss of a loved one, through The Hope and Healing Center. For more information about Compass Regional Hospice, visit compassregionalhospice.org.

Compass Regional Hospice’s Calendar of Events, June through August

June…

Estate Treasures Spectacular Sunday Sale —Sunday, June 10, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., at Estate Treasures, 17 Kent Towne Market, Chester. Take an additional 10 percent off already low prices. There also will be a 50/50 raffle, door prizes and small gift drawings. Estate Treasures, an upscale resale shop, is an affiliate of Compass Regional Hospice. Proceeds will benefit the capital campaign of Compass Regional Hospice. For more information, call 410-643-7360.

Volunteer Training for Camp New Dawn—Wednesday, June 20, 6 to 9 p.m., at The Hope and Healing Center, 255 Comet Drive, Centreville. Camp New Dawn is a four-day, three-night grief retreat summer camp for children, teens and families, and is a program of Compass Regional Hospice. Camp New Dawn would not be possible without the support of Compass Regional Hospice’s specially trained volunteers. More than 100 volunteers help to make sure the camp is fun and full of friendship and learning. For more information, contact Courtney Williams at 443-262-4112 orcwilliams@compassregionalhospice.org.

Camp New Dawn Fundraiser —Thursday, June 28, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., at Fisherman’s Crab Deck, 3032 Kent Narrow Way S., Grasonville. The event will feature a silent auction and 50/50 raffle. Proceeds will benefit Camp New Dawn, a four-day, three-night grief retreat summer camp for children, teens and families, which is a program of Compass Regional Hospice. For more information, contact Kenda Leager at 443-262-4106 or kleager@compassregionalhospice.org.

July…

Volunteer Training for Camp New Dawn—Tuesday, July 10, 6 to 9 p.m., at The Hope and Healing Center, 255 Comet Drive, Centreville. Camp New Dawn is a four-day, three-night grief retreat summer camp for children, teens and families, and is a program of Compass Regional Hospice. Camp New Dawn would not be possible without the support of Compass Regional Hospice’s specially trained volunteers. More than 100 volunteers help to make sure the camp is fun and full of friendship and learning. For more information, contact Courtney Williams at 443-262-4112 or cwilliams@compassregionalhospice.org.

Volunteer Training for Camp New Dawn—Monday, July 30, 6 to 9 p.m., at The Hope and Healing Center, 255 Comet Drive, Centreville. Camp New Dawn is a four-day, three-night grief retreat summer camp for children, teens and families, and is a program of Compass Regional Hospice. Camp New Dawn would not be possible without the support of Compass Regional Hospice’s specially trained volunteers. More than 100 volunteers help to make sure the camp is fun and full of friendship and learning. For more information, contact Courtney Williams at 443-262-4112 or cwilliams@compassregionalhospice.org.

August…

Camp New Dawn— Saturday, Aug. 18, through Tuesday, Aug. 21, at Camp Pecometh, 136 Bookers Wharf Road, Centreville. A four-day, three-night grief retreat summer camp for children, teens and families, through Compass Regional Hospice. For more information or to register, contact Rhonda Knotts at 443-262-4109 or rknotts@compassregionalhospice.org. For more information about volunteering, contact Courtney Williams at 443-262-4112 or cwilliams@compassregionalhospice.org.

Ongoing… 

Bereaved Parent Grief Support Group— First Monday of each month, 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., at The Hope and Healing Center, 255 Comet Drive, Centreville. A drop-in group for individuals, 18 and older, dealing with the loss of a child. For more information, contact Rhonda Knotts at 443-262-4109 or rknotts@compassregionalhospice.org.

HALOS-Healing After a Loved One’s Suicide Grief Support Group—Second Wednesday of each month, 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., at The Hope and Healing Center, 255 Comet Drive, Centreville. A drop-in group for individuals, 18 and older, dealing with the loss of a loved one from suicide. For more information, contact Rhonda Knotts at 443-262-4109 or rknotts@compassregionalhospice.org, or Wayne Larrimore at 443-262-4108 or wlarrimore@compassregionalhospice.org.

Drug Overdose Grief Support Group—Third Thursday of each month, 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., at The Hope and Healing Center, 255 Comet Drive, Centreville.  A drop-in group for individuals, 18 and older, dealing with the loss of a loved one from drug overdose. For more information, contact Rhonda Knotts at 443-262-4109 or rknotts@compssregionalhospice.org, or Linda Turner at 443-262-4120 or lturner@compassregionalhospice.org.

All Losses Grief Support Group— Fourth Tuesday of each month, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., at the Caroline County Public Library, Federalsburg branch, 123 Morris Ave., Federalsburg. A drop-in group for individuals, 18 and older, who have experienced any type of loss. Please bring a lunch. For more information, contact Wayne Larrimore at 443-262-4108 or wlarrimore@compassregionalhospice.org.

Mayorga Receives Hospice Caregivers Award

From L-R: Talbot Hospice Executive Director Vivian Dodge, FHN’s Justin Britcher, RN Dot Mayorga , FHN’s Jenn Chance.

Talbot Hospice RN Dot Mayorga is the recipient of the most recent Hospice Caregiver Award sponsored by Fellows, Helfenbein and Newnam Funeral Home (FHN). The award was created by FHN to recognize dedicated hospice caregivers for their selfless devotion and generosity of heart. Each quarter a caregiver is honored based on a review of nominations from peers, friends, patients and their families and others who feel a particular individual exemplifies the spirit of this award.

A family recently served by Talbot Hospice described Mayorga in their nomination: “Dot integrates all the qualities of a hospice nurse in her care, nursing skill, compassion, and expertise. Dot has a special intuitiveness to sense her patient’s readiness to deal with their multiple challenges and issues. My husband’s cancer caused him to have difficulty processing language. Dot gained his trust with a straight forward and caring style that just worked. Thank you Dot for being there not only for my husband but also for understanding the stress of my dual roles of nurse and wife. I will not forget your call at 11p.m. on a particularly difficult night. I am so grateful for Dot’s role in helping me keep my husband at home until we reached the critical point where he needed to enter Hospice House. You made all the difference.”

“Dot has been a Talbot Hospice nurse for three years, and we are very proud that she has received this award,” said Vivian Dodge, Talbot Hospice Executive Director.“The Caregiver Award exemplifies an individual who has gone above and beyond to care for patients and their families, and Dot demonstrates that every day.”

As part of the recognition, FHN makes a donation in the award recipient’s honor to the “Caregiver’s Heart” Scholarship Fund given to a deserving local high school senior to pursue a career in nursing.

If you have received exceptional care from a Talbot Hospice caregiver and would like to nominate them for the Caregivers Award, send your nomination to Fellows, Helfenbein and Newnam Funeral Home, info@fhnfuneralhome.com, 200 S. Harrison Street, Easton, MD, 21601. For more information call 410-822-3131.

Talbot Hospice: Celebration of Life Planned for June 9

The Child Loss Support Group and Talbot Hospice will host a Celebration of Life commemorating Mother’s & Father’s Day Saturday, June 9, 2018, at The Healing Garden at the Easton Club.

Parents and family members who have lost a child, regardless of the child’s age, are invited to attend. Parking is on Clubhouse Drive, just past the entrance.

In case of a storm, the Celebration of Life will be held at St. Mark’s Church Fellowship Hall. For more information, please call Talbot Hospice at 410-822-6681.

Talbot Hospice Volunteers Honored

On May 9th Talbot Hospice paid tribute to more than 200 volunteers at its annual appreciation luncheon held at Talbot Country Club. “These individuals make an important contribution to our program and are crucial to our ability to offer the breadth and depth of services we provide for patients and families at a very sacred time,” said Vivian Dodge, Executive Director. “Our volunteers donated 15,510 hours of their time in 2017, and we are deeply indebted to them for their altruistic devotion.”

The annual luncheon is funded by the Marita Menzies Endowment Fund, established in 2004 in loving memory of Marita Menzies, former Talbot Hospice Volunteer Coordinator, to provide training programs and appreciation events for Talbot Hospice volunteers.

Photo: Volunteer Advisory Council members (l-r) Brenda Stone, Sally Bent, Jack Anthony, Susan Haddaway, Gordon Ries, Bruce Richardson, and Emilie Joshi received special citations from Senator Addie Eckardt and Delegate Johnny Mautz for their service and leadership. Not pictured Phyllis Peddicord.

Presidential Service and Distinguished Volunteer Awards were given to 43 volunteers with a minimum of 100 hours reported in 2017. Presidential Service Award recipients (first time recipients) were Bettie Baer, Julie Burleson, Eleanor Morrell, Leslye Mosier, and Linda Nabb. Distinguished Volunteer Award recipients (awarded each subsequent year a volunteer qualifies) were:

Jack Anthony, Preston Bascom, Sally Bent, Ginger Bevard, Susan Blankner, Patricia Case, Alex Collins, Ruth Dominick, Nance DuPont, Kathy Foster, Margaret Frampton, Janet Granger, Susan Haddaway, Pat Harden, Liz Hershey, Mary Ann Huckel, Suzie Hurley, Emma Johnson, Emilie Joshi, Florence Lednum, Stuart Levine, Mary Lou Malone, Jean Marvel, Bob Paulus, Phyllis Peddicord, Deborah Pulzone, Pete Rampmeyer, Mary Ann Ray, Cindy Reed, Gordon Ries, Adrienne Rudge, Beverly Serio, Beverly Shea, Anne Slack, Brenda Stone, Kathy Unti, Sara Woodall, Denise Ziegler.

Senator Addie Eckardt and Delegate Johnny Mautz presented special citations to the following Volunteer Advisory Committee members recognizing their dedication and leadership: Jack Anthony, Sally Bent, Susan Haddaway, Emilie Joshi, Phyllis Peddicord, Bruce Richards, Gordon Ries, and Brenda Stone.

Many local businesses donated door prizes for the event including the Avalon Foundation, Chapel’s Country Creamery, Doc’s Downtown Grille, Dragonfly Boutique, Eastern Shore Yoga, Garden &Garnish, George’s Green Thumb, Harrison’s Eastern Shore Restaurant, Hill’s Drug Store, Hog Neck Golf Course Pro Shop, Honeybee Flower Farm, Inn at Perry Cabin, Kissed By The Sun Spa, Lizzy Dee, Salisbury Gift & Garden, Seasonal Flowers, Debbie Setter – Mary Kay Consultant, Sparkle Cleaning, The Christmas Shop, Tranquility Massage & Bodywork, Village Shoppe, and YMCA of the Chesapeake.