Exit Interview: County Council’s Dirck Bartlett Does Not Go Quietly into that Good Night

For many years now, the Spy has tried to catch up with those leaving important positions in Talbot County for what we call an “exit interview.” The phrase comes from the world of human resources departments, eager to have candid insights from departing employees on how their organizations can run better.

In most cases, these Spy interviews have been helpful for the same reason.  Be it an art museum, college, or local government; these conversations allow our subject, free from the restrictions of a formal role, to highlight their institution’s successes and potential challenges in the future. It is also an excellent time to take a modest victory lap in recalling their most meaningful moments in those leadership positions.

In the case of Dirck Bartlett, however, who is concluding his twelve years on the Talbot County Council, his exit interview with the Spy was much more than just a casual word of concern of certain things. Most of his time was spent on talking about the forces at work in Talbot County who are attempting to systematically undo Talbot’s long-standing commitment for land protection and conservation. These same agents, he believes, showed their influence over a majority of his fellow Republican council members in 2018 in such matters as zoning, community noise management, and short-term vacation rental regulations.

Bartlett also does not hold his fire in talking about his views on the Talbot County Republican Central Committee, the fraud committed by those who created “Sears Wheeler,” who was exposed by the Star-Democrat as a fictitious writer of letters to the editor of that newspaper and on the Talbot Spy; the power and influence of developer Jeanie Bryan and the poor judgment of fellow council member Chuck Callahan for accepting a campaign donation from her; and, finally, the deceptive practices of the newly created Common Sense Talbot political action committee.

This video is approximately twenty-four minutes in length.

County Council President Jennifer Williams Responds to Coalition Grievances

County Council President Jennifer Williams might have expected a tough fight this election season, but it would have been tough to predict that she would be the primary target of a local coalition attempting to unseat her. And yet that is indeed the sole purpose of the Bipartisan Coalition For New Council Leadership, chaired by Talbot resident Dan Watson, which includes four locally-based grassroots organizations; they want her out of office.

The Coalition has taken to the web and local media to outline a series of grievances against Ms. Williams in the four years since she won election to the County Council. Specifically, these fall into three categories; the first being zoning and land use
, the second on short-term vacation rentals, and the third is the Council’s recent vote on noise limits in the county. The Coalition also argues that Williams has operated with the support of special interests tied to Talbot County real estate concerns and has had undue influence on the voting of her Republican colleagues, Chuck Callahan, and Corey Pack.

Mr. Watson recently presented the Coalition’s case in a Talbot Spy interview last week, and we immediately reached out to Ms. Williams to offer equal time to respond to their claims. In her interview, she provides a vigorous defense of the Council’s recent actions on zoning, noise levels, and short-term rentals. She also categorically denies being influenced by special interests and coordinating a majority of the Council to advance a pro-growth agenda in the county.

This video is approximately nineteen minutes in length 

 

Talbot County Council Race: A Conversation with Rose Potter

Every election year, the Talbot Spy attempts to use the power of multimedia to introduce candidates for local office in a way that is far less traditional than the typical community forum or debate. Rather than be limited by a set amount of time to state policy views or answer questions, the Spy has used the video interview format to understand more fully a candidate’s points of view as well as their personalities. We continue this practice again this year but with a special partner in tow. The Avalon Foundation’s MCTV, with their wonderful downtown studio and video equipment, has teamed up with the Talbot Spy for a one-on-one with each one of the ten candidates running for office. While we have departed from our usual practice of editing our interviews for the sake of economy, we believe these “gavel to gavel” conversations will prove to be extremely useful as Talbot County voters go to the polls on November 6.

We continue our series with Democrat Rose Potter.  A two-term member of the Town of Trappe Town Council, Potter, graduated from Queen Anne’s County High School and Salisbury University and had worked for the Maryland Higher Education Commission before retiring in 2002.

This video is approximately twenty minutes in length.

 

Talbot County Council Race: A Conversation with Laura Price

Editor Note: It has come to the Spy’s attention that our plan to spread out our interviews with candidates running for the Talbot County Council may be seen as giving an unfair advantage to those whose surnames fall at the beginning of the alphabet. Given that ten candidates are running, and that early voting is still as early as October 25, we are releasing the last three remaining interviews today to mitigate that unintentional bias. 

Every election year, the Talbot Spy attempts to use the power of multimedia to introduce candidates for local office in a way that is far less traditional than the typical community forum or debate. Rather than be limited by a set amount of time to state policy views or answer questions, the Spy has used the video interview format to understand more fully a candidate’s points of view as well as their personalities. We continue this practice again this year but with a special partner in tow. The Avalon Foundation’s MCTV, with their wonderful downtown studio and video equipment, has teamed up with the Talbot Spy for a one-on-one with each one of the ten candidates running for office. While we have departed from our usual practice of editing our interviews for the sake of economy, we believe these “gavel to gavel” conversations will prove to be extremely useful as Talbot County voters go to the polls on November 6.

We continue our series with Republican incumbent Laura Price. First elected in 2010, Laura and her husband have been the owners of Ship and Print Place in Easton since 2002. She attended the University of Delaware.

Talbot County Council Race: A Conversation with Maureen Scott-Taylor

Editor Note: It has come to the Spy’s attention that our plan to spread out our interviews with candidates running for the Talbot County Council may be seen as giving an unfair advantage to those whose surnames fall at the beginning of the alphabet. Given that ten candidates are running, and that early voting is still as early as October 25, we are releasing the last three remaining interviews today to mitigate that unintentional bias. 

Every election year, the Talbot Spy attempts to use the power of multimedia to introduce candidates for local office in a way that is far less traditional than the typical community forum or debate. Rather than be limited by a set amount of time to state policy views or answer questions, the Spy has used the video interview format to understand more fully a candidate’s points of view as well as their personalities. We continue this practice again this year but with a special partner in tow. The Avalon Foundation’s MCTV, with their wonderful downtown studio and video equipment, has teamed up with the Talbot Spy for a one-on-one with each one of the ten candidates running for office. While we have departed from our usual practice of editing our interviews for the sake of economy, we believe these “gavel to gavel” conversations will prove to be extremely useful as Talbot County voters go to the polls on November 6.

We continue our series with Democrat challenger Maureen Scott-Taylor. The former head of marketing at the Tidewater Inn, Talbot County Chamber of Commerce, and director of corporate communications for Easton Utilities, Maureen was elected to the Easton Town Council in 2003, and served until November 2008.  She stepped down upon her appointment by Mayor Robert C. Willey as economic development director for the Town of Easton.

Talbot County Council Race: A Conversation with Jennifer Williams


 

Editor Note: It has come to the Spy’s attention that our plan to spread out our interviews with candidates running for the Talbot County Council may be seen as giving an unfair advantage to those whose surnames fall at the beginning of the alphabet. Given that ten candidates are running, and that early voting is still as early as October 25, we are releasing the last three remaining interviews today to mitigate that unintentional bias. 

Every election year, the Talbot Spy attempts to use the power of multimedia to introduce candidates for local office in a way that is far less traditional than the typical community forum or debate. Rather than be limited by a set amount of time to state policy views or answer questions, the Spy has used the video interview format to understand more fully a candidate’s points of view as well as their personalities. We continue this practice again this year but with a special partner in tow. The Avalon Foundation’s MCTV, with their wonderful downtown studio and video equipment, has teamed up with the Talbot Spy for a one-on-one with each one of the ten candidates running for office. While we have departed from our usual practice of editing our interviews for the sake of economy, we believe these “gavel to gavel” conversations will prove to be extremely useful as Talbot County voters go to the polls on November 6.

We continue our series with Republican Jennifer Williams. Jennifer is the current president of the Talbot County Council. A practicing attorney in Easton, and real estate executive before that, she graduated from the University of Maryland and her JD from the University of Baltimore School of Law.

This video is approximately thirty-five minutes in length.

Talbot County Council Race: A Conversation with Corey Pack

Every election year, the Talbot Spy attempts to use the power of multimedia to introduce candidates for local office in a way that is far less traditional than the typical community forum or debate. Rather than be limited by a set amount of time to state policy views or answer questions, the Spy has used the video interview format to understand more fully a candidate’s points of view as well as their personalities. We continue this practice again this year but with a special partner in tow. The Avalon Foundation’s MCTV, with their wonderful downtown studio and video equipment, has teamed up with the Talbot Spy for a one-on-one with each one of the ten candidates running for office. While we have departed from our usual practice of editing our interviews for the sake of economy, we believe these “gavel to gavel” conversations will prove to be extremely useful as Talbot County voters go to the polls on November 6.

We continue or series with Republican incumbent Corey Pack. Corey is serving his second elected term on the Talbot County Council, after having been appointed in 2007 to fill a vacancy, and currently serves as Vice President.  Mr. Pack has been employed with the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services, and has served as a Field Supervisor in the Mid-Shore area since 2002.

Talbot County Council Race: A Conversation with Naomi Hyman

Every election year, the Talbot Spy attempts to use the power of multimedia to introduce candidates for local office in a way that is far less traditional than the typical community forum or debate. Rather than be limited by a set amount of time to state policy views or answer questions, the Spy has used the video interview format to understand more fully a candidate’s points of view as well as their personalities. We continue this practice again this year but with a special partner in tow. The Avalon Foundation’s MCTV, with their wonderful downtown studio and video equipment, has teamed up with the Talbot Spy for a one-on-one with each one of the ten candidates running for office. While we have departed from our usual practice of editing our interviews for the sake of economy, we believe these “gavel to gavel” conversations will prove to be extremely useful as Talbot County voters go to the polls on November 6.

We continue or series with Democrat Naomi Hyman. Naomi has been a marketing and communications professional for more than three decades. She currently volunteers with the Talbot County Empty Bowls Steering Committee, the Talbot Association of Clergy and Laity (TACL) Executive Committee, and the Frederick Douglass Bicentennial Committee.

This video is approximately twenty minutes in length.

Talbot County Council Race: A Conversation with Peter Lesher

Every election year, the Talbot Spy attempts to use the power of multimedia to introduce candidates for local office in a way that is far less traditional than the typical community forum or debate. Rather than be limited by a set amount of time to state policy views or answer questions, the Spy has used the video interview format to understand more fully a candidate’s points of view as well as their personalities. We continue this practice again this year but with a special partner in tow. The Avalon Foundation’s MCTV, with their wonderful downtown studio and video equipment, has teamed up with the Talbot Spy for a one-on-one with each one of the ten candidates running for office. While we have departed from our usual practice of editing our interviews for the sake of economy, we believe these “gavel to gavel” conversations will prove to be extremely useful as Talbot County voters go to the polls on November 6.

We continue or series with Democrat Pete Lesher. Pete has been a Easton Town Council member since 2009 and has worked as Chief Curator at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum for several decades.

Talbot County Council Race: A Conversation with Keasha Haythe

Every election year, the Talbot Spy attempts to use the power of multimedia to introduce candidates for local office in a way that is far less traditional than the typical community forum or debate. Rather than be limited by a set amount of time to state policy views or answer questions, the Spy has used the video interview format to understand more fully a candidate’s points of view as well as their personalities. We continue this practice again this year but with a special partner in tow. The Avalon Foundation’s MCTV, with their wonderful downtown studio and video equipment, has teamed up with the Talbot Spy for a one-on-one with each one of the ten candidates running for office. While we have departed from our usual practice of editing our interviews for the sake of economy, we believe these “gavel to gavel” conversations will prove to be extremely useful as Talbot County voters go to the polls on November 6.

We continue or series with Democrat Keasha Haythe. Born and raised in Talbot County, Keasha has been a business owner and economic development executive for the last seventeen years.

This video is approximately 20 minutes in length