Bible Talks at St. Michaels Family YMCA to Start February 3

Bible Talks will be held at St. Michaels Family YMCA (1013 S. Talbot Street, St. Michaels, MD 21663) on Sundays at 3:30pm Feb 3, 10 & 17.

The purpose of these services is to encourage genuine interest in the Scriptures and to point from them a way of life that never fails and has not changed with time and circumstance. The speakers, Deborah Wentz, Margaret Long and Audrey Fuller, are without denominational affiliation, but they are in fellowship with a world wide body of Christians, who believe in following the instructions of the New Testament for their ministry and worship. They take no collections, tithes or salaries and distribute no literature. All are welcome to attend these services, which are quiet, reverent and upholding Jesus Christ as the example for all. For more information or questions, please call (717) 513-6027.

Please note that use of the YMCA facilities does not imply endorsement or sponsorship of the event or the group by the YMCA.

Compass Welcomes Medical Director, Readies for Palliative Care Program Launch

Dr. Thomas Walsh

Compass Regional Hospice welcomed its full-time chief medical director, Dr. Thomas Walsh, on Jan. 1, and is preparing to launch its new Compass Palliative Care Program at the beginning of February.

“It is with great pride that we have hired Dr. Tom Walsh as our full-time chief medical director,” said Compass Regional Hospice Executive Director Heather Guerieri. “In addition to now taking on a full-time role with us, he will be leading our newest program, Compass Palliative Care. We will be taking our first referrals for this program on Feb. 4.”

Dr. Thomas Walsh of Queenstown recently retired from his practice with Maryland Primary Care Physicians at the end of 2018 to take on the role of full-time chief medical director with Compass Regional Hospice, effective Jan. 1, 2019. Walsh has been the chief medical director for Compass Regional Hospice since March 2017, working contractually.

Walsh received his Bachelor of Science, magna cum laude, from Benedictine University in Illinois in 1974. He is a 1978 graduate of Rush University’s Rush Medical College in Chicago and completed his residency in family medicine at the University of Maryland Hospital in Baltimore from 1978 to 1981. He has practiced medicine since 1981, first in Anne Arundel County, and has been practicing in Queen Anne’s County since 1988. He was a founding partner and former board member of Maryland Primary Care Physicians and, prior to his retirement, served as the clinical director for its Queenstown site.

“As a family physician, I had the opportunity to be involved in the lives of patients and their families from birth until death,” Walsh said. “My nearly 40 years of medical practice has given me the privilege of caring for thousands of people. End-of-life care has always been an especially important part of my work.”

Walsh also is a Queen Anne’s County Orphan’s Court judge and he is a former member of the Maryland Board of Physicians’ licensing, disciplinary and regulatory board.

“My involvement with Compass Regional Hospice as its chief medical director has given me the chance to be front and center with patients and families when it comes to end-of-life care. I am looking forward to this new role, and I know this partnership will continue to make me a better doctor and a better person,” Walsh said.

Walsh said he and the Compass Regional Hospice team look forward to the Feb. 4 launch of the Compass Palliative Care Program, which will be offered as a home care service to anyone who is dealing with a serious illness and has received a terminal diagnosis or life-expectancy of one year or less.

“I am looking forward to the launch of Compass Regional Hospice’s community palliative care program because it will give our team the opportunity to help more people who are living with and dealing with a serious illness, but are not yet ready for hospice services,” Walsh said. “The services we will be providing will help ensure that no one has to deal with the challenges of living with a serious illness alone.”

Compass Regional Hospice’s Director of Clinical Services, Dr. Holly Hayman, said palliative care is defined by Compass Regional Hospice as “the comprehensive care and management of the physical, psychological, emotional and spiritual needs of patients (of all ages) and their families with a serious and/or life-threatening illness. Palliative Care may be complimentary to curative or life-prolonging therapies that are being used to meet patient-defined goals of care.”

“We are very excited to offer the community-based Compass Palliative Care Program to provide additional medical care for individuals in the community with a life-limiting illness who do not qualify for hospice services,” Hayman said. “The program will provide patients with an additional level of coordinated care to better manage the challenges they face while living with a serious illness. Home visits will be provided by our palliative care physician and a social worker, which will assist the patient’s current medical team with symptom management related to the life-limiting illness.”

To learn more about hospice and palliative care services, or grief support services, available through Compass Regional Hospice, please contact Haymanat 443-262-4104 or hhayman@compassregionalhospice.org.

Compass Regional Hospice – Care on your terms

Compass Regional Hospice is a fully licensed, independent, community-based nonprofit organization certified by Medicare and the state of Maryland and accredited by the Joint Commission. Since 1985, Compass Regional Hospice has been dedicated to supporting people of all ages through the challenge of living with a serious illness and learning to live following the death of a loved one. Today, the organization is a regional provider of hospice care and grief support in Queen Anne’s, Kent and Caroline counties. “Care on your terms” is the promise that guides staff and volunteers as they care for patients in private residences, nursing homes, assisted living facilities and the residential hospice centers in Centreville and Chestertown. Grief support services are offered to children, adults and families of patients who died under hospice care, as well as members of the community who are grieving the loss of a loved one. For more information about Compass Regional Hospice, visit compassregionalhospice.org.

Diners and Bowls Needed for Talbot County Empty Bowls Community Dinner

Kiln Born bowl painting

Tickets for the 11th annual Talbot County Empty Bowls community dinner, scheduled for Sunday, February 24, 2019, are now on sale. The first seating at 5:00 pm sold out quickly. Tickets are still available for the second seating at 6:30pm. The dinner will be held at Immanuel Lutheran Church in Easton.

A ticket to the Talbot County Empty Bowls dinner is $20, which includes soup made by local restaurants and volunteer “soupers.” Bread and cookies round out the menu. Diners take home the hand-painted bowl in which their soup is served as a reminder that someone else’s bowl is often empty.

Tickets can be purchased online at www.talbotcountyemptybowls.org (a credit card processing fee is charged) or by sending a check to Mid-Shore Community Foundation, 102 E. Dover Street, Easton, MD 21601.  Make checks payable to “MSCF – Empty Bowls” and include your phone number and email address.

Thanks to the generosity of volunteers and sponsors, every penny raised from dinner ticket sales and donations is given to food pantries and other organizations committed to serving the hungry in Talbot County. The beneficiaries of the 2019 Talbot County Empty Bowls fundraising initiatives are: Asbury Methodist Church, Easton; Care Packs, Easton; Christ Church St. Michaels Food Pantry; Harvest of Hope Food Pantry, Easton; Neighborhood Service Center, Easton; Presbyterian Church, Easton; St. Vincent de Paul Society, Easton; Scotts United Methodist Church, Trappe; Tilghman Island Food Pantry; and Union United Methodist Church, St. Michaels.

A collection of bowls in which soup is served at the community dinner are made by local potters and high school art students. The majority of the bowls are painted by Empty Bowls supporters at Kiln Born Creations located at 1 S. Washington Street in Easton. The studio fee for bowls painted for Empty Bowls is $15 plus tax. For no additional charge Kiln Born also provides “To Go” boxes filled with unpainted bowls and a selection of paint colors for groups that want to host a bowl painting party at another location.

Bowls painted through Kiln Born are donated for the Empty Bowls dinner along with a portion of the studio fee. The last day to paint bowls for the 2019 Talbot County Empty Bowls dinner is February 14. Call Kiln Born at 410-770-9091 or visit kilnborncreations.com for more information.

“Many of the Empty Bowls community dinner guests have been attending this event for years,” says Anna Harding, the founder of Talbot County Empty Bowls. “Anyone who has an abundance of bowls from past Empty Bowls dinners can bring their surplus bowls to the dinner on February 24. We will recycle these bowls by giving them to people who attend the Community Resource Fair hosted by the Talbot County Hunger Coalition in April.”

Donations to Talbot County Empty Bowls are accepted year round through the Mid-Shore Community Foundation. Make credit card payments atwww.mscf.org. (Specify Talbot County Empty Bowls as the fund under “Additional Information.”) Mail checks payable to Talbot County Empty Bowls to Mid-Shore Community Foundation, 102 E. Dover Street, Easton, MD 21601.

Visit www.TalbotCountyEmptyBowls.org and like Talbot County Empty Bowls on Facebook to learn more about how to participate in ending hunger in Talbot County.

Aerial Fabric Workshop Coming to the Oxford Community Center

Kerianne Hinerman

The New Year brings new commitments to health and wellness. The Oxford Community Center’s quest to enrich lives led them to try the latest trend in exercise, Aerial fabrics. Aerial fabric exercise is also referred to as aerial contortion, aerial ribbons, aerial silks, aerial ribbon and is an exercise when the fabric is used to wrap, spiral, swing, fall or suspend their bodies in and out of a variety of positions. The main tricks in aerial silks are climbs, wraps and drops which have become all the rage in exercise classes.

Aerial fabric classes are not just a great way to have fun and learn new skills, but they also provide a range of unexpected health benefits. Your figure, your health and your mood can be improved through regular participation in aerial activities. The top three benefits are listed below.

1. Strengthened Muscles. Aerial exercises make your body work more intensively because gravity is working harder on your body than usual. Aerial activities look very graceful and effortless but they allow significant energy expenditure. Aerial silks are especially great for improving upper body strength – it’s one of the best ab workouts around. Great news is that aerial silk workouts count as cardio too while providing strength-building benefits. This makes aerial silks a great form of exercise to improve upper body strength and to aid weight loss.

2. Greater Flexibility with Zero-impact. Aerial classes are the perfect way to increase the range of movements possible although being easy on the joints. As your body weight is taken off the ground, injury to the joints are less likely than weight bearing exercise such as running. So, if you have knee or back problems adding such a low-impact workout will work great for you. When you have freedom of movement, you can move your body into new positions to provide stretching that goes beyond the muscles to tendons and ligaments, helping to prevent injuries. This can result in a deeper and more fulfilling stretch than traditional gym workouts offer.

3. Better Focus and Stress Relief. Aerial silks put you in some challenging situations, so you are likely to concentrate harder. The joy of knowing that you did something new and amazing makes you feel good about yourself, increase your self-confidence and self-esteem. Aerial silk classes are one of the best mind-body activities that reduce stress – after a class you’ll walk away feeling Zen. Aerial silks instill a sense of freedom as you sail through the air and at the same time you receive an adrenaline rush from this.

You will be excited to find a form of exercise that is so playful! Aerial silk classes will make you feel free and creative while increasing your strength, improving your body and boosting your self-esteem.

Kerianne Hinerman is an aerial artist with years of experience teaching.  She will be offering a six week Beginner Aerial Fabric Workshop on Tuesdays at 10:00 am starting January 29th.  This one hour beginning aerial fabric workshop is designed to introduce you to movement with, in, and around the fabric.  Aerial fabric is soft and suspends you in a very gentle, forgiving way. The class will focus on stretching, strengthening, and full body awareness.  Each session will begin with a warm up including stretching and upper body/abdominal strengthening followed by basic aerial work that includes knot work, swinging, floating, and learning various poses, all assisted and performed low to the ground. The beginning aerial fabric class will accommodate people that have the desire to get a gentle full-body workout and stretch.

Try something new!  This class is designed to include all ages, abilities, body types, and lifestyles.  Anyone can do it!  You won’t believe that getting some exercise could be so much fun!

Workshop runs for six weeks on Tuesdays (1/29 – 3/5) from 10:00-11:00 am.  Cost is $120 per participant with a maximum of six participants.

OCC invites the public to come to a free open house with Kerianne to see her demonstrate and answer any questions you may have about the aerial fabric exercise. The free open house is Friday, January 25th at 10:00 AM.

OCC offers free and low cost programs throughout the year thanks to the generous annual fund donors and events. 63% of all events are offered for free. The money raised by the health programs goes directly towards serving our greater community with new educational programs, after school activities for kids, national speakers, concerts and more. To reserve your spot, visit oxfordcc.org or call 410-226-5904. The OCC is a non-profit organization focused on education and enrichment.

Upcoming Programming at the Library January 28 to February 2

Read with Latte, a Certified Therapy Dog, at the Easton Library

On Monday, January 28, at 4:00 p.m., the Easton branch of the Talbot County Free Library invites children 5 and older to bring a book or choose one from the library’s shelves to read with Janet Dickey and her dog, Latte.  All library programs are free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register to attend this program.  For more information, please call the library at 410-822-1626, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact:  Laura Powell, telephone: 410-822-1626

Easton Library Book Group to Discuss “And the Mountains Echoed” by Khaled Hosseini

On Monday, January 28, at 6:00 p.m., in the Easton branch of the Talbot County Free Library, the Easton Book Group will discuss “And the Mountains Echoed” by acclaimed New York Times best-selling author Khaled Hosseini.  All library programs are free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register to attend this program.  For more information, please call the library at 410-822-1626, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Bill Peak, telephone: 410-822-1626

Easton Library to Host Cabin Fever Film Festival on Winter Saturdays at One O’clock

On Saturday, February 2, at 1:00 p.m., the Easton branch of the Talbot County Free Library, as part of its Winter Cabin Fever Film Festival, will show an award-winning Sci-Fi film on the library’s big, professional screen.  The movie, which was released in 2018, is rated PG-13.  All library programs are free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register to attend this film.  For more information (including the title of this film which, due to licensing requirements, we cannot publicize here), please call the library at 410-822-1626, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Scotti Oliver, telephone: 410-822-1626

Talbot Arts Council Invites Grant Requests for Arts Programs

The Talbot County Arts Council invites applications for Community Arts Development Grants to support arts projects and programs during July 2019 to June 2020.  The cutoff date for grant applications is March 31, and organizations selected will be notified by April 30.

Applications are judged on the basis of the artistic merit of the proposed arts activities, the perceived ability of the applying organization to carry them out, and how well the program will serve the residents and guests of Talbot County.  Because the Arts Council receives more grant requests than can be accommodated by available resources, it retains the right to accept or reject applications, suggest changes, and support grant requests in full, in part, or not at all.

As required by the Maryland State Arts Council, local grant awards must be matched on at least a one-for-one basis in cash by the requesting organization. Applicants must be organized as Maryland non-profit corporations with IRS tax-exempt status, or be government-related entities such as libraries or parks and recreation departments.  Organizations that would like additional information about CAD Grants, or assistance with the application procedure, are welcome to contact the Arts Council by phone or email.

The Arts Council is offering a workshop on CAD Grant preparation to which the public is invited.  The workshop will be held at 7 pm, Tuesday, January 29, at the Arts Council office in the county complex at 215 Bay Street in Easton.  Anyone interested in attending should advise the Arts Council in advance.

Grants to public and private schools in Talbot County under the Arts-in-Education Program are handled separately.  That announcement will be made in mid-August for programs during the next school year.  Mini-grants up to $500 for new arts organizations or initiatives may be requested at any time, with grants considered in the month following their submission.

CAD Grant information is being sent directly to organizations that received grants during the past two years.  Packets are also available for downloading from the Arts Council=s website: www.talbotarts.org. For further information, contact the Talbot County Arts Council by phone 410-310-9812 or email gearly@talbotarts.org.

Mid Shore Community Mediation Holds Info Session

Interested in making peace? If you are interested in helping resolve local disputes, consider volunteering as a community mediator. Mediation can help everyone. You’ll learn skills that will help you manage your own conflicts while you learn to help others work through disagreements and make plans about their future.

Mid Shore Community Mediation Center is holding January information sessions for anyone interested in finding out how mediation works and why it matters.  Staff and volunteers will talk about what they do and how mediation makes a difference in hundreds of people’s lives every year. The Center’s mission is to build stronger communities by facilitating fair, free and prompt resolution of disputes.

Mediation is a confidential, non-judgmental process through which those involved are supported by a neutral third party, to have productive conversations, hear each other, and move forward with plans that they create together

Mid Shore Community Mediation Center is a nonprofit community resource that delivers around 500 mediations across the community each year. The center receives referrals from individuals, the courts, community organizations and schools. Highly trained staff and volunteers mediate disputes within families, between neighbors, landlords and tenants, with business organizations and for people coming out of incarceration.

Find out more about who we are, what we do and how you can become a volunteer community mediator at:

Talbot County Free Library, Easton on Thursday, January 24, 2019 at 5:30 pm

Chesapeake College, Cambridge on Tuesday January 29, 2019 at 5:30 pm

For more on the information sessions or to RSVP, call 410-820-5553 or email info@midshoremediation.org.

The Mid Shore Community Mediation Center is committed to bringing harmony and strength to our community through peace and understanding. The Center’s mission is to build stronger communities by facilitating fair, free and prompt resolution of disputes in Caroline, Talbot, and Dorchester Counties.  To find out more, visit midshoremediation.org.

For community members in Kent and Queen Anne’s Counties visit Community Mediation Upper Shore at CMUSmediation.org. For those in Wicomico, Somerset, and Worchester Counties visit Tri-Community Mediation at TriCommunityMediation.org.

Upcoming Programming at the Library January 22 to 26

Easton Library to Offer Story Time

On Tuesdays, January 22 – February 26, at 10:00 a.m., the Easton branch of the Talbot County Free Library will hold a Story Time for children 5 and under accompanied by an adult.  All library programs are free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register to attend this program.  For more information, please call the library at 410-822-1626, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Laura Powell, telephone: 410-822-1626

Acclaimed Landscape Designer and Author to Speak at Easton Library

On Tuesday, January 22, from 1:30 – 3:00 p.m., in the Easton branch of the Talbot County Free Library, Landscape Designer Rick Darke will share his strategies for making and maintaining a diverse, layered landscape.  Darke heads a consulting firm focused on conservation-based landscape design; his work blends art, ecology, and cultural geography in the creation and stewardship of living landscapes.  Darke has customized his talk to fit the conditions in our area.

You can learn more about Darke and his work at: http://www.rickdarke.com/  All library programs are free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register to attend this program.  For more information (including the title of this film which, due to licensing agreements, we cannot publish here), please call the library at 410-822-1626, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Dana Newman, telephone: 410-822-1626

Middle School Students to Create Their Own “Soul Collage” at the Easton Library

On Wednesdays, January 23 & 30, from 4:00 – 5:30 p.m., the Easton branch of the Talbot County Free Library invites middle school students to express their inner world with a “soul collage.”  No artistic experience is required in this judgment-free zone that offers students the opportunity to give voice to their own inner wisdom.  All library programs are free and open to the public, but patrons are asked to pre-register to attend this program.  For more information, please call the library at 410-822-1626, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Laura Powell, telephone: 410-822-1626

St. Michaels Library to Offer Story Time

On Wednesday, January 23, at 10:30 a.m., the St. Michaels branch of the Talbot County Free Library will offer a Story Time program for children 5 and under accompanied by an adult.  All library programs are free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register to attend this program.  For more information, please call the library at 410-745-5877, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Diana Hastings, telephone: 410-745-5877

Easton Library to Host Young Gardeners Club

On Thursday, January 24, at 3:45 p.m., the Easton branch of the Talbot County Free Library will host a Young Gardeners Club program for children in grades 1 – 4.  All library programs are free and open to the public, but patrons do need to pre-register to participate in this program.  This program is sponsored by the Talbot County Garden Club.  For more information, please call the library at 410-822-1626, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Laura Powell, telephone: 410-822-1626

St. Michaels Library to Offer Family Games

On Thursday, January 24, at 3:30 p.m., the St. Michaels branch of the Talbot County Free Library will offer an afternoon of board games and fun educational children’s games for all ages (children 5 and under need to be accompanied by an adult).  All library programs are free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register to attend this program.  For more information, please call the library at 410-745-5877, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Diana Hastings, telephone: 410-745-5877

Blue Sky Puppet Theatre to Stage “The Three Not So Little Pigs” at Easton Library

On Saturday, January 26, at 11:00 a.m., the Easton branch of the Talbot County Free Library will be the scene of a great puppet show— “The Three Not So Little Pigs”—presented by the Blue Sky Puppet Theatre.  This professional theatre troop invites patrons to join them for an updated, comic version of the classic children’s story, featuring a vegetarian wolf, remote control cars, electric guitars, and three pigs that need to work together and learn to cooperate.  This one will be fun for the whole family.  All library programs are free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register to attend this program.  For more information, please call the library at 410-822-1626, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Laura Powell, telephone: 410-822-1626

Easton Library to Offer Cabin Fever Film Festival on Winter Saturdays at One O’Clock

On Saturday, January 26, at 1:00 p.m., the Easton branch of the Talbot County Free Library will show another free film on its big, professional screen as part of the library’s Winter Cabin Fever Festival on Saturdays.  The January 26 offering is an animated, feature film rated PG.  All library programs are free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register to attend this program.  For more information (including the title of this film which, due to licensing agreements, we cannot publish here), please call the library at 410-822-1626, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Scotti Oliver, telephone: 410-822-1626

CBMM Earns Maryland Tourism Award

The Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Md. was honored at the 38th annual Maryland Tourism & Travel Summit, held Nov. 14-16 at the Hyatt Regency Chesapeake Bay in Cambridge, Md. The summit was sponsored and managed by the Maryland Tourism Coalition, drawing together hundreds of the state’s top tourism industry professionals.

CBMM received the “Best Digital Campaign Award” for its unique use of digital media integrated with advertising creative and other campaign components promoting CBMM as an idyllic, waterfront wedding venue. CBMM’s campaign included digital advertising across a network of websites, all of which then directed visitors back to the museum’s website, where they had the option to download CBMM’s official wedding guide for additional information and details.

The Maryland Tourism Coalition annually presents awards recognizing creative, thoughtful, and innovative destination marketing programs that bring visitors to Maryland.

Photo: From left – MTC Second Vice Chair and National Aquarium Director of Sales Nora Campbell; CBMM Content Marketing Manager Bethany Ziegler; CBMM Communications& Art Director Izzy Mercado; CBMM Vice President of Communications Tracey Johns; and MTC First Vice Chair and Baltimore-Rent-a-Tour President Chris Riehl.

For this project, CBMM’s communications department consulted with a media partner to determine optimal ad targeting, frequency, and placement for its campaign, which resulted in booked weddings on 100% of its available dates for 2018.

“The campaign features high-end photography, rotating imagery, professional design, and brand support to help showcase the upscale beauty of CBMM’s venues and encourage visitors to make the Chesapeake part of their wedding story,” said CBMM Communications& Art Director Izzy Mercado, who spearheaded the project.

The Maryland Tourism Coalition advocates on behalf of Maryland’s tourism industry, requesting funding for promotion and advertising from the Maryland General Assembly and the Executive Branch of Government. Today, Maryland’s tourism industry returns millions of dollars to the state and local tax bases, while supporting more than 200,000 jobs.At the conference, Maryland’s Office of Tourism reported more than 40 million people visited Maryland in 2017,generating $2.4 billion in state and local taxes while maintaining a growth rate of about two percent each year.More information is at mdtourism.org.

The Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum is a non-profit educational organization dedicated to preserving and exploring the history, environment, and culture of the entire Chesapeake Bay region, and making this resource available to all. Every aspect of fulfilling this mission is driven by CBMM’s values of relevancy, authenticity, and stewardship, along with a commitment to providing engaging guest experiences and transformative educational programming, all while serving as a vital community partner. For more information, go to cbmm.org or call 410-745-2916.

Learn Electronic Navigation at CBMM January 19

From 10 a.m. to noon on Saturday, January 19, the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Md., is offering an Electronic Navigation for Non-Technical People workshop, with class size limited and registration needed.

Participants will join Capt. Jerry Friedman, a USCG-licensed Master, as he provides short non-technical descriptions of how GPS, GPS chart plotters, radar, depth sounders, and automated identification systems work.

A retired electrical engineering executive, Friedman has held a USCG captain’s license for 60 years. During that time, he also operated an emergency service towboat for Boat US, assisting boaters along the Chesapeake Bay in distress, delivering boats around the Chesapeake and from Florida and Long Island to Annapolis, teaching navigation courses, editing a monthly professional captains’ publication, and providing instruction to boat owners in the operation of their boats. He currently holds a 100-ton Master’s license and serves as the volunteer lead captain of CBMM’s 1920 buyboat Winnie Estelle.

Friedman will also be leading a Boating Essentials class February 9-10, and a Chart Navigation class March 2-3 at CBMM, with more information at cbmm.org/shipyardprograms.

CBMM’s 18-acre campus is situated in a park-like setting along the Miles River and St. Michaels harbor, and is within walking distance to the shops, restaurants, inns, and other attractions within St. Michaels’ historic district.

The Jan. 19 Electronic Navigation workshop will be held in CBMM’s Van Lennep Auditorium and is $20 per participant, with a 20% discount to CBMM members and pre-registration at bit.ly/navigation19.