Talbot County Unboxed: Londonderryopoly

The hot game in Easton everyone is talking about might not be Pickleball anymore. It’s a variation of a board game that almost everyone is familiar with, and it’s called Londonderryopoly.

Londonderryopoly, modeled after the classic Monopoly board game, was created by the Londonderry team as its 2018 holiday gift. The game board features images of Londonderry and the amenities. The property squares are named after the cottages and apartment floor plans located in Londonderry, names such as Waverly, Neavitt and Tred Avon.

The game pieces feature symbols of the Eastern Shore like a duck and sailboat. The entire game experience is uniquely “Londonderry” and has received rave reviews from residents, community and business partners.

The Spy received its own copy and decided to unbox it as a community service.

This video is approximately one minute  in length. For more information about Londonderry, please go here.

Five Champion Trees Recognized at Londonderry on the Tred Avon

Five trees on the Londonderry on the Tred Avon campus have been recognized by the Maryland Big Tree Program as Talbot County Champion Trees. Champion trees are identified at the County and State level as being the largest identified members of their species. They are measured and scored based on their circumference, height and average crown width.

The trees were identified as Londonderry was taking care of routine forestry work around its campus and were nominated for recognition by Agnes Kedmenecz of the University of Maryland Extension Service. The trees were later measured by members of the Londonderry Community, University of Maryland Extension Service and the Maryland Big Tree Program, which is a volunteer-coordinated effort sponsored by the Maryland Association of Forest Conservancy District Boards and the Maryland Department of Natural Resources’ Forest Service.

The five trees are in various areas of the campus with several near the Manor which was constructed at the close of the American Civil War.

The five trees identified as “Champion Trees” are the following:

• Japanese Maple measuring 5’ 8” in circumference, 33’ high and a 44.5’ average crown width
• Bitternut Hickory measuring 9’8” in circumference, 144’ high and a 68.5’ average crown width
• Nordmann Fir measuring 7’8” in circumference, 73’ high and a 34.5’ average crown width
• American Beech measuring 12’4” in circumference, 104’ high and a80’ average crown width
• Southern Red Oak measuring 20’3’ in circumference, 107 feet high and a 107.5’average crown width

“Our community is beyond thrilled to have five champion trees on our campus,” said Londonderry CEO, Irma Toce. “These trees are part of our rich history and it is wonderful that they can now be recognized by our residents and our neighbors throughout Talbot County. I’d like to thank our community members who worked so hard on this project.”

Londonderry on the Tred Avon was originally part of a 600-acre land grant known as Westmoreland which was granted to Irish Quaker immigrant Francis Armstrong in 1667. A portion of the land grant was sold to Talbot County upon which the first Talbot County Court House was built. As the property changed hands over the next 100 years, it became known as London Derry, and eventually Londonderry, as it is called today.

About Londonderry on the Tred Avon

Londonderry on the Tred Avon is an intimate residential cooperative community for adults ages 62 and over, offering a variety of housing options from convenient apartments to spacious cottages among 29 acres, including 1500 feet of waterfront shoreline. For more information, visit www.londonderrytredavon.com.

Londonderry on the Tred Avon Celebrates the Holiday Season

Londonderry on the Tred Avon celebrated the holiday season with several outreach efforts and social activities over the past few weeks. Londonderry residents decorated a tree for the Festival of Trees, supported local toy drives, performed holiday concerts out in the surrounding community and gathered together in the Tred Avon Tavern for a holiday dinner.

“Everyone at Londonderry truly embraces the holiday spirit,” said Irma Toce, Londonderry on the Tred Avon CEO. “Everyone who lives at Londonderry makes a point to celebrate with each other and to help make the holiday a bit brighter for those in need.”

Over Thanksgiving weekend, Londonderry sponsored a tree for Festival of Trees in support of the Talbot Hospice Foundation. The tree was themed “Star Light, Star Bright, Children’s Magical Christmas Night” and was displayed at the Tidewater Inn and later at Londonderry’s new Clubhouse for the whole community to enjoy through Christmas.

Londonderry residents also supported the Easton Police Department’s Annual Toy Drive as well as Toys for Tots by donating more than 100 toys that will be given to underprivileged children this Christmas.

Londonderry’s Choral Group, the Jammers, performed and spread holiday cheer throughout Easton, and concluded their tour with a special performance for their Londonderry neighbors on December 17th.

Finally, the Londonderry community gathered together on December 11th for their Holiday Dinner. Residents enjoyed a festive evening featuring prime rib and lamb prepared by Chef Jordan Lloyd.

About Londonderry on the Tred Avon

Londonderry on the Tred Avon is an intimate residential cooperative community for adults ages 62 and over, offering a variety of housing options from convenient apartments to spacious cottages among 29 acres, including 1500 feet of waterfront shoreline. For more information, visit www.londonderrytredavon.com.

The Residents of Londonderry: Bob Woods

One of the many questions you could ask Bob Wood about his exceptional life is, “how in the world did a graduate of West Point end up teaching Navy Midshipmen how to sail?”

It’s a great story.

When Bob Wood transferred from Brown University to West Point in 1941, the United States had yet to enter WWII. As the reality of going to war set-in as their school careers progressed, he and his classmates were excited and anxious to serve.

Bob Wood graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in January of 1943 in the top quarter of his class. This is significant as 1943 was the only year where there were two graduating classes. With the United States fully committed to WWII, it was critical to get soldiers overseas as soon as possible.

Bob entered the Army Corp of Engineers following graduation and completed additional training at Ft. Belvoir in Virginia. He was later assigned to the 7th Armored Division known as the “Lucky Seven.”

As Bob and his fellow soldiers were on the Queen Mary in New York getting ready to head overseas, the troops received news of the D-Day invasion of Normandy on June 6, 1944. When they landed in Scotland, they traveled through Southern England and then joined-up with the Army in France and stayed through the conclusion of the War in Europe.

Following V-E Day in May of 1945, Bob remained in Europe for the next few years and was stationed in Germany to assist with the Corp of Engineers’ rebuilding efforts. His wife, Cynthia, or “Cynnie” met him in Germany and they took up residence in a resort community in Bavaria where they lived in the house of a former Nazi officer. Their first daughter, Michael, arrived soon after, and Cynthia’s mother also joined them to help with the baby.

The young family returned to the United States and Bob left the Army and took a job in Chicago. Shortly after, he was called back to West Point to join the General’s Staff to help run the school as other officers had been sent overseas to serve in the Korean War. Cynthia and Bob welcomed their second daughter, Cindy, during their time in West Point.

Following the Korean War, the Woods returned to Chicago and then moved with Bob’s career – living in New York and the New Jersey where their son, Robert Jr., called Casey, was born. Bob worked as a consultant on Wall Street for many years while he and Cynthia raised their family.

Bob and Cynthia later relocated to Annapolis when Bob accepted a new position in Washington D.C. Both Bob and Cynthia were avid sailors and enjoyed being on the water.

Following Cynthia’s death, Bob remained in Annapolis and later met his second wife, Frances.

During his time in Annapolis, Bob became a sailing instructor with the Naval Academy, a role he enjoyed immensely. While Bob didn’t boast about his Army career, he was eventually discovered when a Midshipman caught sight of his class ring and realized a West Point graduate was teaching them how to sail!

After more than a decade in Annapolis, Frances convinced Bob to move to the Eastern Shore, an area she had grown to love with her first husband, and they settled in St. Michaels in the 1980s. They enjoyed and active retirement and continued sailing.

Frances passed away in August of 2014 and Bob remained at their home in St. Michaels until he moved to Londonderry in September 2015. He continued sailing until just recently.

This past May, Bob attended his 75th Reunion at West Point with his two daughters where he was joined by another classmate, and the families of several others. They also took some time to visit their old homes in New Jersey and New York as they made their way back to Easton.

Bob will celebrate is 98th birthday this month and is a proud father, grandfather, great-grandfather and veteran.

Senior Nation: Life at Londonderry on the Tred Avon

Easton has three distinctive examples of the Gothic Revival Style; one is the rectory of Christ Church, the second is the Trippe-Beale house at the corner of South and Aurora Streets and the third example is the Magnolia Manor, located on the grounds of Londonderry on the Tred Avon and formerly known as the Manor House. Londonderry began its life as a 600-acre tract of land known as London Derry. The land granted in 1667 from Lord Baltimore to an Irish Quaker, Francis Armstrong. A portion of the land grant was sold to Talbot County and was later used to build the courthouse and the Friends Meeting House in Easton.

 

Magnolia Manor was built shortly after the Civil War and was designed by one of the founding members of the American Institute of Architects, Richard Upjohn, who chose Port Deposit granite, brought in by boat up the Tred Avon River, as the house’s exterior material. The distinctive polygonal shaped entrance bay that projects from the front façade, the elaborate exterior detail indicative of the Gothic Revival style with its steeply pitched gable roof crowned with an ornate cross gable, the cornice, arched windows and shutters are a few of the reasons this manor house is now a Maryland Historic Trust Property. A fire destroyed the third floor and the porches in the 1960’s but fortunately the elaborate Gothic details remain.

On April 16, 1992, ground was broken and Londonderry transitioned from a private historical residence to one of less than ninety-eight senior living cooperatives in the country. Londonderry was the first independent living cooperative established on the Eastern Shore for residents aged 62 or older.

Londonderry not only provides maintenance free living on the Tred Avon River, but a vibrant community life as well.

Londonderry on the Tred Avon has grown to over 170 residents with five different apartment floor plans and eighteen different cottage floor plans. Cottages and apartments range from 574 square feet to over 3,000 square feet. With permission, residents may modify or add features to their apartments and cottages to reflect their personal tastes and interests. Three of the cottages were designed by Easton architects. Christine M. Dayton, Architect, designed the “Bellevue” and “Royal Oak” models and Atelier 11 Architects designed the “Skipton” model. All of the original lots have now been sold.

When the community was in its incipient stage of growth, the residents used Magnolia Manor as their Community Center. While Magnolia Manor is still used by the residents, it can also be rented by the public for special events. Over the last 25 years Londonderry has added a larger Community Center including the dining room “Tred Avon Tavern”. Recently the Spy reported on the opening of the Clubhouse, designed by Atelier 11 Architects, as a center of community life including fitness, hobby, and personal care activities. All the cottages and apartments are conveniently located near the new Clubhouse and community building.

The grounds of Londonderry on the Tred Avon are surrounded by nature. Residents enjoy strolling along the waterfront, biking or relaxing on their patios. Each cottage and apartment is unique; if you had the opportunity to visit every residence in Londonderry you would see how each of them live “Your Life, Your Way”.

For more information about Londonderry on the Tred Avon or how to rent Magnolia Manor for your event, contact Rachel L. Smith, Director of Sales and Marketing at 410-820-8732 or 800-752-8732 or rsmith@londonderrytredavon.com or visit the web site at www.londonderrytredavon.com or magnoliamanormd.com. The “Bellevue” and “Royal Oak” models were designed by Christine M. Dayton Architect, 410-822-3130, staff@cdaytonarchitect.com, www.cdaytonarchitect.com. The “Skipton” model was designed by Atelier 11 Architects, 410-822-3680, info@a11architecture.com, www.atelier11architecture.com.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Senior Nation: Ask Irma on Taking a Long Trip at 86 Years Old

Senior Nation is committed to offering resources to help us deal with the challenges and opportunities of aging. To that end, we are launching a new monthly column called “Ask Irma” by Irma Toce, where we focus on all topics related to aging.

Dear Irma,

I am 86, in pretty good health and I want to go on a safari in Africa My children are upset and my oldest daughter doesn’t even speak to me at the moment Should I stay home? I really want to go.
The Old Adventurer.

Dear Adventurer,

Your children are likely upset because they are worried about you. Have you shared your travel plans with them? Is it an organized trip and if so have you given them as much information as you could?

If you feel healthy and up to a trip and your physician has given you a clean bill of health by all means enjoy the adventure You might want to bring an iPhone or iPad so you can FAceTime or Skype with your children and that might make them feel better I am sure they’ll all get “over” it when you return and I hope your oldest daughter is going to give you a big send off

Bon voyage!

Irma Toce is the  CEO of Londonderry on the Tred Avon with over 25 years experience work with seniors. Her years of experience in the field is accompanied by BS in social work and an MA in health management, Irma not only leads the dynamic community of Londonderry, but she is also nationally recognized as an expert in the field of aging

Londonderry on the Tred Avon’s Grand Opening of New Community Center

Londonderry on the Tred Avon will host the Grand Opening of its new Clubhouse on Tuesday, September 18th from 4:00 – 6:00pm. Londonderry residents and the public are invited to attend and enjoy food, drinks and live music. An advance RSVP is required

“All of us at Londonderry are excited to celebrate this important milestone,” said Irma Toce, Londonderry on the Tred Avon CEO. “After several years of planning and construction, the wait is finally over. We are thrilled to present this new space to our residents and offer even more amenities and gathering spaces within our community.”

The 5,000 square foot space features as fitness center, salon, large multipurpose room, catering kitchen, meeting room, outdoor deck and with seating and overlook tower.The Sales and Marketing Office has also moved into the new space.

Please RSVP for the event by visiting www.londonderrytredavon.com.

About Londonderry on the Tred Avon

Londonderry on the Tred Avon is an intimate residential cooperative community for adults ages 62+, offering a variety of housing options from convenient apartments to spacious cottages among 29 acres, including 1500 feet of waterfront shoreline. For more information,visit www.londonderrytredavon.com.

Senior Nation’s Ask Irma: My 86 Year Old Mom is Falling More Often Now

Senior Nation is committed to offering resources to help us deal with the challenges and opportunities of aging. To that end, we are launching a new monthly column called “Ask Irma” by Irma Toce, where we focus on all topics related to aging.

Dear Irma,

Mom has been falling more these past few weeks, should we place her in a nursing home? She is 86 and currently lives alone

**************************
Thank you very much for your question.

First of all let’s have a look in mom’s home. Are there any trip hazards? Area rugs, lots of furniture, different flooring in different rooms, stairs etc.

Secondly how is mom’s diet? Is she eating well balanced meals and snacks throughout the day.

Does mom exercise, does she take yoga or balance classes?

Thirdly, and most importantly, is she drinking enough fluids throughout the day (8 glasses of water) Dehydration is a common cause for dizziness, urinary track infections etc. all of which can cause a person to fall. This is the season to hydrate even more because of the heat and humidity.

There could be numerous causes for a person to fall, I only mentioned a few but please have mom checked by her physician to rule out any medical issues.

Take care!

Irma

Irma Toce is the  CEO of Londonderry on the Tred Avon with over 25 years experience work with seniors. Her years of experience in the field is accompanied by BS in social work and an MA in health management, Irma not only leads the dynamic community of Londonderry, but she is also nationally recognized as an expert in the field of aging.

Senior Nation: Ask Irma

Senior Nation is committed to offering resources to help us deal with the challenges and opportunities of aging. To that end, we are launching a new monthly column called “Ask Irma” by Irma Toce, where we focus on all topics related to aging.

Dear Irma,

When is the right time to move into senior housing?

Respectfully,

“Stayathomemom”

******************************************

Dear StayAtHomeMom,

This probably is the question I have heard most throughout my career And my answer is always “Move and enjoy before it is too late”

I say that because all too often consumers wait for an “event” to happen Whether it’s moving into independent living, assisted living or a dementia assisted living, it has become very clear no one is ever quite ready to make the move So we wait and I have seen prospects actually wait so long they now do not qualify for the senior living of their choice

My advice is when you start thinking about senior living, start to look while you are still able to make decisions and fully capable of participating with all the amenities and programs that are being offered to enjoy life to the fullest Don’t wait for that fall to happen or someone wondering off

Start a whole new fresh chapter in life with wonderful peers to share stories with and make new memories with.

Fondly

Irma

Irma Toce is the  CEO of Londonderry on the Tred Avon with over 25 years experience work with seniors. Her years of experience in the field is accompanied by BS in social work and an MA in health management, Irma not only leads the dynamic community of Londonderry, but she is also nationally recognized as an expert in the field of aging.

 

Senior Nation: One Building Lot Left at Londonderry on the Tred Avon

Londonderry on the Tred Avon announces they are nearing completion of their independent living community. Londonderry is an intimate cooperative community for adults ages 62+ offering maintenance-free living, new Clubhouse facilities, a full programs and events calendar, limited medical support and transportation off campus.

“The past 3 years have been very exciting as we’ve been able to watch Londonderry gain over 20 new cottages and welcome new neighbors to our community,” said Rachel Smith Director of Sales Marketing. “We encourage anyone who has been considering moving to Londonderry to take advantage of this last new construction opportunity.”

The one remaining lot is conveniently located within walking distance of the new Clubhouse and can accommodate the Skipton, Belleuve and Easton models.

“Building a retirement home at Londonderry is a special experience,” said Smith. “For some, this is their first new home, and the ability to work with our builder to customize their new home to suit their tastes and lifestyle is exciting.”

Photos and floor plans of the available models may be found online at www.londonderrytredavon.com under the “new construction” section. Interested seniors may contact the Sales and Marketing Office at 410-820-8732 to learn more and schedule a tour of the campus.

 

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