Dr. Rachel Franklin Presents “William Wyler, The Films and His Music”

Dr. Rachel Franklin presents William Wyler, The Films and His Music at the Academy Art Museum to close Chesapeake Film Festival, Sunday, October 29, 4:30 p.m. Tickets for sale at $12/ticket or $50 for a Sunday pass. www.chesapeakefilmfestival.com

Dr. Rachel Franklin, a British-born concert pianist, and a renowned speaker and performer in the Mid-Atlantic, will present a lecture on film music, William Wyler, The Films and His Music, at the Academy Art Museum.  Her performance closes the 2017 Chesapeake Film Festival. A reception follows with an awards presentation for the Festival’s best films in different categories.

Director William Wyler made some of the most memorable films in the Hollywood canon, and worked with many distinguished composers. Among the dazzling array of musical talent are Max Steiner, Miklos Rosza, and Aaron Copland.  How did Steiner conceive his score for Wyler’s Ben-Hur and what unique qualities did Aaron Copland bring to his exquisite and searing music for The Heiress?  Audiences will thrill to Jerome Moross’ fabulous theme to The Big Country and admire the subtle, heartwarming genius of Hugo Friedhofer’s score to The Best Years of Our Lives.  Franklin also discusses the near miraculous ability of Wyler to frame a great shot and how his composers managed to reflect his masterful intentions.

The 2017 Chesapeake Film Festival celebrates its 10th anniversary with a series of national and local films followed by film maker Q & A, and expert panel discussions.  The CFF headquarters is the Avalon Theatre. Satellite theaters include the Talbot County Public Library, Easton Premier Cinemas, and Academy Art Museum. This year, for the first time, CFF extends to a second city at the Cambridge Premier Cinemas.

Chesapeake Film Festival Hosts a Day of Film and Discussion about Climate Change

On October 28th, the 2017 Chesapeake Film Festival shows the power of documentary film in a full day of national and local films on the topic of climate change.  A subject widely discussed and sometimes contentious, audiences will view a series of dynamic films that both inform and entertain.  Thought leaders in the field will be on hand to clarify the impacts of climate change on the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries and beyond, and on the human, public health, and economic losses for those who live on the shoreline and work its waters.

The Avalon Theatre opens its doors at 10:30 a.m. with a series of environmental shorts: When I Plant A Tree, directed by Jonah Moshammer; Fisherman Without A Sea, directed by Lucas Bonetti; The Next Epoch Seed Library, directed by Candace Thompson; and The Last Boat Out, directed by Laura Seltzer-Duny.

The program’s formal launch begins at noon with opening remarks from Program Chair and Tilghman resident George A. Nilson, and from Charles O. Monk, II, Board of Visitors Chair of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES, Horn Point).

Leonardo DiCaprio has long brought his celebrity to raising awareness of climate change.  In National Geographic’s Before the Flood produced by Martin Scorsese, DiCaprio meets with scientists worldwide to discuss the impacts of climate change. The film opened to acclaim at the Washington DC.

Environmental Film Festival last April, and CFF Artistic Director Cid Collins Walker succeeded in securing permission to show the film in the Easton festival.

A partnership with the Eastern Shore Land Conservancy brings substantive expertise to the film discussions.  Following the DiCaprio film, Town Creek Foundation Executive Director Stuart Clarke will moderate a discussion among Maryland Secretary of the Environment, Benjamin H. Grumbles and Dr. Donald Boesch, Professor of Marine Science, President of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES) until September 2017. Jacqueline Patterson, Director of the NAACP Environment and Climate Justice Program has been invited and confirmation is pending.

The next film, The Ashes, also a NatGeo film, is directed by Michael Bonifiglio, and funded by Bloomberg Philanthropies.  The devastating impacts of coal mining, storing and exporting are vividly shown. The film presents the divergent views between the miners, environmentalists, and government policy makers.

Next up are three films presented together that present the dangers we face on our treasured bay and shoreline.

Waterman, directed by Jess Jacklin, presents a portrait of her grandfather Harry and his relationship to the Chesapeake Bay. After writing songs for over 50 years spent out on the water, Harry performs at the Waterfowl Festival for the first time at age 87. The film follows his journey- a last attempt to save the bay advocating through his music, aiming to remind us all of what’s at stake.

In The Ballad of Holland Island House, director by Lynn Tomlinson uses clay-on-glass animation to tell the true story of the last house on a sinking island in the Chesapeake Bay, off Tilghman Island.

In High Tide In Dorchester, writer and narrator Tom Horton recalls hitting softballs with friends in front of his dad’s hunting and fishing cabin on the Honga River in lower Dorchester County.  Today, the ballfield is four feet underwater and 200 feet from the shoreline.  The film addresses the lack of adequate planning needed to meet the imminent challenges of living on the edges of a rising tide.

The discussion following this trilogy of films will be moderated by Brian Ambrette, Coastal Resilience Manager, Eastern Shore Land Conservancy, and includes William C. “Bill” Boicourt, Professor Emeritus, Horn Point Laboratory UMCES, Tom Horton, Writer, High Tide In Dorchester; David Harp, Director, High Tide in Dorchester; Jess Jacklin, Director, Waterman (and her Grandad appears in the film), and Laura Seltzer-Duny, Director, The Last Boat Out.

Following a late afternoon reception, at 7 p.m.Oyster, an Australian film directed by Kim Beamish screens. It tells the story of a passionate Australian  oyster farmer who swears that the water is getting warmer and the storms more severe.  The only oyster legal for them to grow is the gourmet’s delight, the Sydney Rock Oyster. The story follows his work to keep a few million oysters alive, and necessary decisions to deal with the pressures of climate change and environmental damage, and their  far reaching consequences.

And finally, Al Gore’s film, An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power, a sequel to An Inconvenient Truth, addresses the progress made to persuade government leaders to invest in renewable energy, culminating in the landmark signing of the 2016 Paris Climate Agreement. This film will be shown at the Easton Premier Cinemas on Saturday, October 28, at 9:30 p.m., and on Sunday, October 29 at 1 p.m.  In Cambridge, the screening is on October 29 at 7:45 p.m.

The Avalon Theater is the Chesapeake Film Festival headquarters, with satellite venues at the Art Academy Museum, Talbot County Public Library, and Easton & Cambridge Premier Cinemas.  Tickets are reasonably priced: $12 per film, or $50 for a full day program.  Friday Opening Night tickets are $30. Saturday and Sunday programs combined are $85.   For further information about all films and special events, and to purchase tickets, visit www.chesapeakefilmfestival.com.

The Chesapeake Film Festival welcomes public support with sponsorships and program advertisements.  Please contact executivedirector@chesapeakefilmfestival.com to support its mission.

Mark the Date: 10th Chesapeake Film Festival to Begin on October 27

The 10th Anniversary Chesapeake Film Festival brings filmmakers and a diverse audience of film enthusiasts to Easton for the region’s only weekend event that features independent films. Some critics call independent films the most important art form of the 21st century. Audiences have the chance to engage in critical discourse about the film, often with the filmmaker present.

The Avalon Theater is the Chesapeake Film Festival headquarters, with satellite venues at the Academy Art Museum, Talbot County Public Library, and Easton & Cambridge Premier Cinemas. Tickets are reasonably priced, $12 per film; $50 for one day; and $85 for an all-access pass. A special opening film and party is $30. For further information about all films, day and all-access passes, special events, and tickets please visit www.chesapeakefilmfestival.com.

Opening night, October 27th, begins at the Troika Gallery with a Greek-themed cocktail party before a short walk to the Avalon Theatre to enjoy the comedy Swing Away. Filmed mostly in Greece, it is about professional golfer Zoe Papadopolus who travels to her grandparent’s village in Greece to escape the harsh spotlight of the women’s professional golf tour. Actor John O’Hurley (remember Seinfeld’s Mr. Peterman?) stars in the movie. An avid golfer himself, upper level Festival sponsors are invited to play golf with O’Hurley at the Talbot County Country Club.

Because environmental concerns are integral to the Eastern Shore across the political spectrum, Saturday, October 28th is a full day of documentaries with climate change as a common theme. A partnership with the Eastern Shore Land Conservancy brings substantive expertise to the film discussions. Viewers will see the power of documentary filmmaking in understanding this widely discussed and often contentious topic. Discussion will be interspersed between films moderated by Stuart Clarke, Executive Director, Town Creek Foundation. Experts include Maryland Secretary of the Environment, Benjamin H. Grumbles; Dr. Donald Boesch, Professor of Marine Science and president of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, 1990-2017; Dr. William C. “Bill” Boicourt, Professor Emeritus, Horn Point Laboratory, UMECS; and Brian Ambrette, Coastal Resilience Manager at the Eastern Shore Land Conservancy.

The film sequence begins with National Geographic’s, Before the Flood, produced by Martin Scorsese, in which actor Leonardo DiCaprio meets with scientists worldwide to discuss the impacts of climate change. From the Ashes presents the voices from all sides of the debate about the coal industry as alternative energy gains steam. The coal industry provides tens of thousands of jobs to America’s blue-collar backbone. Regrettably, it is also the single largest source of the carbon dioxide emissions contributing to global warming, and public health officials warn of the myriad risks of mining and burning coal.

High Tide in Dorchester, written and narrated by Tom Horton, directed by Dave Harp, and produced by Sandy Cannon-Brown addresses the lack of adequate planning needed to meet the imminent challenges of living on the edges of a rising tide. Two shorts, The Ballad of Holland Island House produced by Lynn Tomlinson and The Waterman produced by Jess Jacklin, are touchingly intimate portrayals of our local legacy.

On Sunday, October 29th at the Art Academy Museum, the Festival will screen AlphaGo about an artificial intelligence; hosts a student film showcase featuring young filmmakers from Easton High School who are learning filmmaking under the guidance of instructor Garnette Hines. Hines will join Lori Snyder, Executive Director of Arts Education in Maryland Schools (AEMS), and filmmakers to discuss student engagement in this art form. The Festival closes with William Wyler: The Films & The Music, presented by Dr. Rachel Franklin. After the last film, an awards ceremony and cocktail party will close the Festival.

The Chesapeake Film Festival welcomes public support with sponsorships and program advertisements.

Chesapeake Film Festival Hosts Ann Hornaday, Washington Post Film Critic

Ann Hornaday, the Washington Post’s Chief Movie Critic, comes to Easton, MD on Sunday evening, July 16, 2017 to discuss Talking PicturesHow to Watch Movies, her new book for people who want to look at film with a more critical eye.  The Chesapeake Film Festival hosts the interactive evening, where audiences can discuss with Ann their favorite films and exchange views how some movies come to be meaningful and have a lasting effect long after leaving the theater.

Eric Kohn, chief critic, Indiewire wrote, “Ann Hornaday knows movies, but more importantly, she knows how to write about movies for a diverse readership.  This book is an extension of that essential talent, a clear-eyed assessment of what makes this art form so engaging, and how to ask hard questions of it.  Anyone remotely intrigued by the film making process will learn something new about it – I know I did –and come away with a fresh toolkit for debating movies old and new.  Hornaday’s book is a quintessential reminder that movies are a major art form, and it’s a must-read for anyone who feels the same way.”

Ann Hornaday grew up in Des Moines, Iowa and graduated cum laude with a degree in Government from Smith College. After working at Ms. Magazine as a researcher and editorial assistant, she became a freelance writer in New York City, where she eventually began to write about movies for the New York Times Arts & Leisure section and other publications. In 1995, she became the movie critic at the Austin American-Statesman in Austin, Texas, where she stayed for two years before moving to Baltimore to be the movie critic at the Baltimore Sun. She left the Sun in 2000 and began working at the Washington Post in 2002. She was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in criticism in 2008.

The Chesapeake Film Festival presents Maryland’s Eastern Shore best in cinematic storytelling. This 2017 Festival —October 27th – 29th —celebrates CFF’s 10th anniversary year.  More than 1,500 guests are expected to review 40 films at Easton’s historic Avalon Theater, and at other locations.  This year’s Festival explores such wide-ranging themes as climate change, social justice, the challenges of aging, and recreation that distinguishes the Eastern Shore.

Date: & Time: Sunday, July 16, 2017, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.
Place: With lite fare at Scossa Restaurant & Lounge, Easton, MD
Tickets: $50 Event only; $77.60 Event + book
Purchase tickets online at www.chesapeakefilmfestival.com

The Festival is funded in part by grants from the Maryland Film Office and the Talbot County Arts Council, with revenues provided by the Maryland State Arts Council.

TCFL Hosts Chesapeake Film Festival with Family-Friendly Films and Activities

On Saturday, October 29th at 9 a.m., at the Easton Library, the Chesapeake Film Festival introduces the screening of Karate Kid with a real life demonstration of one of the most widely practiced martial art forms in the world. The Olympic sport requires acute mental and physical conditioning to use only the hands and feet in defensive and counteracting body movements. With movements developed in Japan, India and China over the course of several thousands of years, there are today countless variations.

Master Chris Dyer Sr. 6th Degree Black Belt and owner of Dyer’s Karate, based in Collingdale, PA will be leading a Karate Demonstration. Attendees will learn Basic Martial Arts Skills and Anti-Bullying Techniques. In honor of the film Wax On/Wax Off, Paint the Fence and the Crane Technique will also be taught.

9:45 a.m. Film — The Karate Kid directed by John Avildsen

Daniel (Ralph Macchio) moves to Southern California with his mother, Lucille (Randee Heller), but quickly finds himself the target of a group of bullies who study karate at the Cobra Kai dojo. Fortunately, Daniel befriends Mr. Miyagi (Noriyuki “Pat” Morita), an unassuming repairman who just happens to be a martial arts master himself. Miyagi takes Daniel under his wing, training him in a more compassionate form of karate and preparing him to compete against the brutal Cobra Kai.

Noon — Karate Demonstration for John Avildsen
12:15 — Post Film Q & A with Master Chris Dyer, 12:15 p.m.
12:45 p.m. — Cardboard Dreams directed by Andrew Harmon

Jack (Tyler Desharnais), an adventure-loving 10-year old, is determined to get his older brother to think he’s cool, while the whimsical Marigold (Sarah Hazen) is simply trying to get her grief-stricken father to notice her again. Together, they focus their desire to rebuild their broken families into rebuilding a neglected, old playhouse in the woods. There they stumble into worlds of pirate ships, woodland fairies and fire-breathing dragons where they discover that friendship can overcome any adversity.

1:15 p.m. — Black Captains of the Chesapeake directed by Professor S. Torriano Berry
(second screening Sunday, October 30, Easton Premier Cinema, 6:45 p.m.)

Black Captains of the Chesapeake explores the lives and work of a group of African American Head Boat Captains sailing out of Kent Narrows. For over 50 years, they have carried out fishing parties on the Chesapeake Bay. The documentary also tells of their easy days as watermen harvesting the once plentiful boundary of crabs, oysters and clams. Now they must rely on the charter fishing trade alone to earn a living. These captains discuss the dangers on the bay, their total commitment to their work, and the uncertain future.

S. Torriano Berry is an award-winning independent is filmmaker who has created and executive produced the anthology series Black Independent Showcase and Black Visions/Silver Screen: Howard University Student Film Showcase for WHUT-TV 32, in Washington, D.C.

As a writer, Berry co-authored the film resource books, “The 10 Most Influential Black Films,” published by Citadel Press in 2001, and “Historical Dictionary of African American Cinema,” Scarecrow Press, 2007 (“A to Z of African American Cinema” – Paperback)

The Chesapeake Film Festival is funded in part by a grants from the Maryland Firm Office and the Talbot County Arts Council, with revenues provided by the Maryland State Arts Council.

www.ChesapeakeFilmFestival.com for full program, All Access Passes, individual tickets

Crashing the Party

Crashing the Party: The Behind-the-Curtains Story of Bill Clinton’s 1992 Presidential Election.

After three crushing defeats in the presidential campaigns of the 1980s, then-Governor Bill Clinton and a band of rebels in the Democratic Leadership Council challenged the sacred cows of the Democratic Party. Crashing the Party, directed by David Sigal, features exclusive interviews with President Clinton, Al From, Rev. Jesse Jackson, Haley Barbour, Dick Gephardt, Tom Brokaw, Paul Begala, and many others. The film is the riveting inside story of the exceptional people and transformative ideas that revived the Democratic Party and originated the Clinton legend.

Based on political strategist Al From’s 2013 book, The New Democrats and the Return to Power. Mr. From is a former member of the Board of Visitors at the U.S. Naval Academy and lives in Annapolis.

Q & A following the firm with Al From, Founder/CEO, Democratic Leadership Council and author of the 2013 book The New Democrats and the Return to Power, Crashing The Party.

“A movie pick for Republicans frantically trying to figure out how to revive what remains of the Grand Old Party now that Donald Trump has thrown it into the hole it dug for itself” – The Daily Beast

Screening Saturday, October 29 at 12 Noon at the Easton Premier Cinema

The Chesapeake Film Festival is funded in part by a grants from the Maryland Firm Office and the Talbot County Arts Council, with revenues provided by the Maryland State Arts Council.

www.ChesapeakeFilmFestival.com for full program, All Access Passes, individual tickets

Ninth Annual Chesapeake Film Festival to Open with Three Nautical Films

The Chesapeake Film Festival opens at the Avalon Theater on October 27th with a cocktail party at 5:30 p.m. Opening night festivities bring together filmmakers and buffs from across the region and from far distances.

Opening night features Gary Jobson, the pre-eminent American ambassador for sailing, Jobson serves as ESPN’s sailing analyst and NBC ‘s Summer Olympics sailing correspondent.  He is joined by award-winning nautical cinematographer, Alexis Andrews.

Ticket Price: Included in $85 All Access Pass Adults; $45 All Access Students with ID or $10 single film ticket, adult; $8. Student with ID.  For tickets and information visit chesapeakefilmfestival.com.

The Magic and Mystery of Sable Island, directed by Gary Jobson, 6:15 p.m.; Q & A at 7:15 p.m. with Gary Jobson

Gary Jobson presents his latest project, an environmental documentary comprised of video, historic film and stills, set against one of the world’s most remote and beautiful landscapes.   Sable Island is the newest gem in the Parks Canada array of a nation’s natural wonders.

A small, intrepid band of six sailors heads into the North Atlantic, bound for one of the ocean’s most remote and inaccessible islands.  They leave Halifax, NS on the 36-foot slope Tazzarin to explore the past, present and future of one of seafaring’s most feared places and its haunting past a feared mystery.  Known as the “Graveyard of the Atlantic,” Sable Island is infamous for hundreds of shipwrecks over four centuries. Perched between the conflicting flows of the warm Gulf Stream and the icy Labrador Current, Sable, with her frequent storms and ever shifting shoals becomes the byword of those “in peril on the sea.”   Shipwreck survivals, wreckers, sealers, explorers and lifesaving crews intertwine in the distant island’s history.  The team’s archaeologists uncover Sable’s past amid a backdrop of endless sand dunes, wildlife and ocean.

Ted Turner’s Greatest Race: 1979 Fastnet, directed by Gary Jobson, 7:00 p.m.; Q & A with Gary Jobson at 7:15 p.m.

The famed Fastnet Race is held every two years by the Royal Ocean Racing Club on a 605 miles from Cowes direct to the Fastnet Rock and then to Plymouth via south the of the Isles of Scilly.  When the winner of the 1977 America’s Cup Ted Turner entered his 60-foot yacht Tenacious in the 1979 race, a freak storm turned the Celtic Sea into chaos, wreaking havoc on over 306 yachts taking part, resulting in 18 fatalities (15 yachtsmen and 3 rescuers). Emergency services, naval forces, and civilian vessels from around the west side of the English Channel were summoned to aid what became the largest ever rescue operation in peace-time. This involved some 4,000 people including the entire Irish Naval Service’s fleet, lifeboats, commercial boats, and helicopters.In this film, the victorious crew of the Tenacious relive the voyage, of which Turner famously said: “I was more afraid of losing than I was of dying.”

vanishing-sail

Vanishing Sail, The Story of a Caribbean Tradition, written, firmed and directed by Alexis Andrews, 7:30 p.m.; Q & A with Alexis Andrew and Gary Jobson at 9 p.m.

Sail was once the lifeblood of the Caribbean, and hundreds of wooden schooners were once launched in the Lesser Antilles, more than anywhere in the West Indies.  Today, locals struggle to keep wooden boat building alive for the survival of the island’s fisherman.

The Chesapeake Film Festival is funded in part by a grants from the Maryland Firm Office and the Talbot County Arts Council, with revenues  provided by the Maryland State Arts Council.

Chesapeake Film Festival, Coming Soon to Easton

Opening October 27th at Easton’s historic Avalon Theater, the 9th annual Chesapeake Film Festival brings a wide-ranging variety of distinctive documentary, narrative, comedy and short films to the Chesapeake region. Q&As with filmmakers explore their creative processes. Expert panels add to the film experience with context and interpretation of a film’s purpose. Films will appeal to audiences who desire to deepen their experience of new cinema thinking on the film industry. Over four days, 39 films will be shown at the Avalon Theater, Easton Premier Cinema, and the Academy of Art Museum.

Schedule of events:

Thursday, October 27, 2016

THE AVALON THEATER, Opening Night Gala 5:30 p.m.

A cinematic treat with a special screening of three sailing films, two directed by world class sailor Gary Jobson, the pre-eminent ambassador for sailing in the U.S. Jobson leads a Q & A after the films. The third maritime film will be a film directed by Alexis Andrews.

The Magic & Mystery of Sable Island; Ted Turner’s Greatest Race: 1979 Fastnet; Vanishing Sail, The Story of a Caribbean Tradition (directed by Alexis Andrews)

Friday, October 28, 2016

THE AVALON THEATER

• ARREO, directed by Tato Moreno, 4:00 PM
• John Avildsen: King of the Underdogs, 6:00 PM, Q & A with John Avildsen and Derek Wayne Johnson, 8:00 PM

SPECIAL EVENT, 7:00 PM – Chesapeake Film Festival Lifetime Achievement Award awarded to Oscar-winning director John Avildsen. VIP Cocktail Party follows at the Tidewater Inn.

• Awakenings, directed by Bargav Saikia, 8:45 p.m.
• Awakening, directed by Rolf Lindblom, 9 p.m.
• Night, Night, directed by Justin Doecher, 9:15 p.m.
• Runoff, directed by Kimberly Levin, 9:30 p.m.

Saturday, October 29, 2016,

THE AVALON THEATRE

• The Angel Within, 10:00 a.m.; Q & A at 11:15 a.m. with director Robert Thayer, Kessler
• City of Trees, 11:45 a.m.; Q & A at 1:00 p.m. with director Brandon Kramer and producer Lance Kramer and cast members of the film.
• Hungry, directed by Jillie and Thomas Simon, 1:20 p.m.
• Lean On Me, directed by John Avildsen, 1:45 p.m.; Q & A with John Avildsen, 3:45 p.m.
• Priceless, directed by Peter Callahan, 4:15 p.m.; Q & A with Peter Callahan, Stacey Brumbaugh and cast at 4:45 p.m.
• Zoo (Volkerschau), directed by Monda Webb, 5:00 p.m.; Q & A with Monda Webb at 5:45 p.m.
• The Ride, directed by Callie Cagwin, 5:00 p.m.; Q & A at 5:45 p.m. with Callie Cagwin
• Tick Tock Clock, directed by Gail Reaben, 5:00 p.m.; Q & A at 5:45 p.m. with Gail Reaben
• Thornbird, directed by Jonathan Stutzman, 5:00 p.m.; Q & A at 5:45 p.m. with Jonathan Stutzman
• TRI, directed by Jai Jamison, 6:30 p.m.; Q & A at 8:15 p.m. with Jai Jamison, Ted Adams, Kimberly Skyrme, Dave McGillivray, Gerry Boyle and Peter Paris.
• The Runaway, directed by Nick DeRuve, 8:45 p.m.

EASTON PREMIER CINEMA

• Crashing the Party, directed by David Sigal, 12:00 Noon; Q & A at 1:30 p.m. with Al From
• Sharks of War: Truth, Tales, & Terror, directed by Robert Cantrell, 1:45 p.m.
• In the Name of the Moon: A Sailor Moon Documentary, directed by Anthony Jacoway and Tiffany Lewis 2:45 p.m.
• Breaking Through the Clouds, directed by Heather Taylor, 4:00 p.m.; Q & A with Heather Taylor at 5:50 p.m.
• Nighthawks on the Blue Highway, directed by Michael Streissguth, 6:15 p.m.
• Need Change, directed by Rob Waters, 7:45 p.m.

TALBOT COUNTY LIBRARY

SPECIAL EVENT – Karate Workshop, Saturday, October 29, Talbot County Free Library, 9:00 a.m.; Q & A with actor Chris Dyer, 12:15 p.m.

• Karate Kid, directed by John Avildsen, 9:45 a.m.

SPECIAL EVENT – Karate Demonstration for John Avildsen, 12:00 Noon

• Cardboard Dreams, Saturday, directed by Andrew Harmon 12:45 p.m.
• Black Captains of the Chesapeake, directed by Professor Stephen Barry, 1:15 p.m.

Sunday, October 30, 2016

THE AVALON THEATRE

• Tale of the Tongs, directed by Judith Dwan Hallet, 12:00 Noon; Q & A with Judith Dwan Hallet, Stanley Hallet, Sandy Cannon-Brown, Tom Horton and Dave Harp 2:15 p.m.
• Beautiful Swimmers Revisited, directed by Sandy Cannon-Brown with producers Tom Horton and Dave harp, 1:15 p.m.; Q & A with Judith Dwan Hallet, Stanley Hallet, Sandy Cannon-Brown, Tom Horton and Dave Harp 2:15 p.m.
• For Whom the Bell Tolls – Recording of an Opera in Progress: Act I Scene 3, directed by Brian Wilbur Grundstrom, 2:45 p.m.; Q & A with Brian Wilbur Grundstrom and Rachel Franklin, 4:15 p.m.
• Moosehead’s Wicked Good Plan directed by Sarah Katz, 2:45 p.m.; Q & A at 4:15 p.m.; Q & A at 4:15 p.m.
• The Bonobo Connection Sunday, directed by Irene A. Magafan, 2:45 p.m.; Q & A at 4:15 p.m.
• Captain Blood, directed by Michael Curtiz, 6:30p.m., To celebrate the 100th Anniversary of Olivia de Havilland and Halloween, anyone wearing a pirate’s costume will be admitted FREE.

SPECIAL EVENT – The Chesapeake Film Festival Award Ceremony to Honor the Filmmakers, The Avalon Theatre, 5:15 p.m.

The First Annual Chesapeake Film Festival Awards Ceremony honors the filmmakers of the 2016 Chesapeake Film Festival. In attendance will be members of the CFF board of directors, judges, and industry guests. The Festival will recognize exceptional talent in the categories of: best feature film, best short film, best student film, best actor & actress, among others.

THE ACADEMY OF ART

• The Chalkboard Chronicles, co-directed by Tom Judd and Jeff Wolfe, Noon; Q & A following the film at 12:45pm

EASTON PREMIER CINEMA

• Wind Carry My Tears, directed by Jiao Wang, Noon
• Cowlick, directed by Lindsey Sitz, 12:30 p.m.
• Extra School, directed by Cary Anderson, 12:45 p.m.
• Double Ply with Nowhere, directed by Judy Rifka, sound by Frank Rathbone, 1:00 p.m.
• Letters from Alcatraz, Directed by Madeleine Rozwat, 1:30p.m.

The Chesapeake Film Festival is funded in part by a grants from the Maryland Firm Office and the Talbot County Arts Council, with revenues provided by the Maryland State Arts Council.

www.ChesapeakeFilmFestival.com for full program, All Access Passes, individual tickets

Was the World’s First Film Director a Woman?

The inaugural event in a new talk & screening series is free to the area community, and features as guest speaker Catherine Wyler of the Women’s Film Preservation Fund, and as moderator Chesapeake Film Festival’s own Kimberly Skyrme, casting director for House of Cards, among many other film and television productions. The evening promises to be an enlightening discovery of little-known motion picture history.

Festivities begin with a reception and presentation at 6:00pm on Tuesday, April 19, at The Talbot County Free
Library at 100 West Dover Street in Easton. Discussion and Q&A follows a screening of the 1911 comedy short, “Mixed Pets,” directed by Alice Guy Blaché.

“Part of the new vision for Chesapeake Film Festival is to serve our community with programming that reflects the area’s interest in heritage and history,” said Joan Leanos, newly elected Board President of Chesapeake Film Festival. “We’re thrilled to have two of the most accomplished women in today’s movie industry bringing us fascinating historical insight and entertainment.”

The earliest days of moviemaking saw many varieties of experimentation, but Alice Guy Blaché may well have been the very first to actually craft stories on film, fundamentally shaping what it meant to be a director as the role is defined today. From 1896 to 1906 Alice Guy was almost certainly the only woman filmmaker in the world. Barbra Streisand has suggested that Alice Guy Blaché was indeed the inventor of the film director’s job.

Visit ChesapeakeFilmFestival.com for more details on Alice Guy Blaché and the screening.

Chesapeake Film Festival Hosts Conversation on Legacy of Film Director Alice Guy Blaché April 19

The Chesapeake Film Festival inaugural event for the year takes the form of a new talk & screening series that is free to the community, and features as guest speaker Catherine Wyler of the Women’s Film Preservation Fund, and as moderator, Chesapeake Film Festival’s own Kimberly Skyrme, casting director for House of Cards, among many other film and television productions. The evening promises to be an enlightening discovery of little-known motion picture history.

Festivities begin with a reception and presentation at 6:00 at The Talbot County Free Library at 100 West Dover Street in Easton on April 19. Discussion and Q&A follows a screening of the 1911 comedy short, “Mixed Pets,” directed by Alice Guy Blaché.

“Part of the new vision for Chesapeake Film Festival is to serve our community with programming that reflects the area’s interest in heritage and history,” said Joan Leanos, newly elected Board President of Chesapeake Film Festival. “We’re thrilled to have two of the most accomplished women in today’s movie industry bringing us fascinating historical insight and entertainment.”

The earliest days of moviemaking saw many varieties of experimentation, but Alice Guy Blaché may well have been the very first to actually craft stories on film, fundamentally shaping what it meant to be a director as the role is defined today. From 1896 to 1906 Alice Guy was almost certainly the only woman filmmaker in the world. Barbra Streisand has suggested that Alice Guy Blaché was indeed the inventor of the film director’s job.

Visit ChesapeakeFilmFestival.com for more details on Alice Guy Blaché and the screening.