Upcoming Programming at the Library July 30 to August 3

St. Michaels Library to Screen Animated Film

On Monday, July 30, at noon, the St. Michaels branch of the Talbot County Free Library will show an animated film, rated G, on its big, professional screen.  All library programs are free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register to attend this film.  For more information  (including the title of this movie which, due to licensing restrictions, we cannot publicize here), please call the library at 410-745-5877, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Diana Hastings, telephone: 410-745-5877

St. Michaels Library to Offer Maker Space

On Wednesday, August 1, at 3:30 p.m., in the St. Michaels branch of the Talbot County Free Library, children 6 and older will have the chance to enjoy STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)—building with Legos and Zoobs!  All library programs are free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register to participate in this program.  For more information, please call the library at 410-745-5877, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Diana Hastings, telephone: 410-745-5877

St. Michaels Library to Offer Arts & Crafts

On Thursday, August 2, from 10:00 a.m. – noon, the St. Michaels branch of the Talbot County Free Library will hold an arts and crafts program.  Instruction will be available for knitting, beading, needlework, and tatting.  Patrons are invited to bring their coloring books, Zentangle pens, or anything else that fuels their passion for being creative.  All library programs are free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register to participate in this program.  For more information, please call the library at 410-745-5877, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Shauna Beulah, telephone: 410-745-5877

Easton Library to Host American Folk Tales and Songs … on Stage!

On Thursday, August 2, at 10:30 a.m., in the Easton branch of the Talbot County Free Library, the Hampstead Stage Company will put on a live show about America’s great legends.  All library programs are free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register to attend this production.  For more information, please call the library at 410-822-1626, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Laura Powell, telephone: 410-822-1626

Easton Library To Screen a Puppet Movie

On Friday, August 3, at 2:30 p.m., the Easton branch of the Talbot County Free Library will show an award-winning puppet movie, rated G, on its big, professional screen.  All library programs are free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register to attend this film.  For more information (including the title of this movie which, due to licensing restrictions, we cannot publicize here), please call the library at 410-822-1626, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Laura Powell, telephone: 410-822-1626

Character Counts Honors Volunteers at Appreciation Dinner

Character Counts Mid Shore (CCMS) recently hosted its annual volunteer appreciation dinner at The Milestone in Easton to honor the hundreds of Character Coaches who teach character lessons based on the Six Pillars of Character throughout the school year. This celebration provided an opportunity for staff and Board of Trustee members to show their appreciation to the volunteers, school staff and donors who support the mission of CCMS.

“This evening is about so many people, but it’s really about our Character Coaches”, states CCMS Executive Director Susan Luby.  “As a Character Coach, you give time – time, the most precious resource of our life.  Your time as a volunteer must be valued, but we can’t put a value on time. How can you value something that is precious and priceless?’

Outgoing CCMS Board of Trustee member, Beth Terhorst, was recognized for her time and dedication to the organization with a citation from Senator Addie Eckardt.  Terhorst also serves as a Character Coach at Lockerman Middle School in Denton.

L-R : Susan Luby, CCMS Executive Director; Character Coaches Bob Hyman and Jeff Webb along with Josh Deutsch, CCMS Development Associate celebrate the Fred Rogers Award.

Two longtime Character Coaches were presented with the Mr. Fred Rogers Award.  Bob Hyman is the Character Coach for Talbot County’s third grade students and Jeff Webb coaches the entire Vienna Elementary School.  They were honored with citations from Senator Eckardt and Delegate Johnny Mautz, both who also serve as Character Coaches.  Hyman and Webb also received a cardigan sweater with the CCMS logo on it.

Two Easton High School students, Katie Allen and Lucas Joshi, served as Character Coaches at Easton Elementary – Dobson in first grade.  Katie remarked, “As a student of Talbot County Public Schools all my life, I’ve had the privilege of participating in Character Counts for 13 years; I say privilege because this program is such an uplifting network of lessons on the Six Pillars of Character.  Over the years, I’ve truly learned how lessons of being responsible, trustworthy and respectful have shaped me into the person I am today.”

Luby concluded the evening by saying, “We realize the giving of your time is simply magnificent.  This evening, we take time out to thank you for the amazing time in that you give.”

Character Counts Mid Shore is a local 501C3 organization that is not funded by the school systems and does not receive financial support from any government entities. For more information about CCMS, please visit their website at www.charactercountsmidshore.com or call the office at 410-819-0386.

Port Street Perspectives: The Neighborhood Service Center with Corey Pack

It seems only natural given all the zoning, governance, and commercial interests at stake with a future Easton Point, that there has been an extraordinary focus over the last year or so on that rare piece of Easton waterfront and how it will be used in the next decade or so. But as anyone one from the Easton Economic Development Corporation will tell you, the segment of Port Street between the Easton By-pass (Route 322) and West Street is just as complicated and filled with an equal number of opportunities as well.

For within that one-mile zone consists of a community that has existed long before Port Street lost its historic purpose of providing a transportation axis between the town’s waterfront and the merchants located downtown.  It has also become one of Easton’s most diverse neighborhoods.

And one institution that has been there for decades has been the Neighborhood Service Center, which exists to improve the quality of life both socially and economically for low-income residents in Talbot County. The spy had an opportunity to talk to the president of that service agency’s board, County Council member Corey Pack.  In our interview, we discuss both the current and future vision for Port Street and the unique opportunities and challenges it brings to its residents, and to Easton at large.

This video is approximately five minutes in length. The production was co-sponsored by the Easton Economic Development Corporation. For more information about their mission or on the Port Street project, please go here

CBMM Receives National Heritage Program Grant

The Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Md. recently received a grant from the National Maritime Heritage Program to support a Bay-wide heritage tour of Edna E. Lockwood in 2019.

The National Park Service collaborated with the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Maritime Administration to fund more than 34 Maritime Heritage education and preservation projects, which work to conserve maritime artifacts and spread awareness about maritime legacies.

“We are very grateful for the support of the National Park Service, to help us tell the story of the history and preservation of Edna Lockwood,” said CBMM President Kristen Greenaway. “The years of hard work, ingenuity, and dedication our team has shown to so carefully restore Edna are truly impressive, and we’re thrilled for all to be able to experience her story first-hand.”

Edna E. Lockwood, was designated as a National Historic Landmark in 1994 as the last historic bugeye still under sail. Since 2016, she has been undergoing a major renovation, with shipwrights and apprentices at CBMM replacing her nine-log hull in full public view.

Following her relaunch at CBMM’s Oysterfest on Oct. 27, 2018, Edna will visit more than 20 different ports of the Chesapeake Bay, all which have been selected for the significance that the oystering industry has had on their maritime community and heritage. The planned Bay-wide tour will be Edna’s most extensive travel in her 130-year history, exceeding the six-port tour she conducted for her centennial in 1989.

The goal of this tour is to expose audiences in Maryland, Virginia, and Washington D.C., to programming and dock-side interpretation surrounding traditional Chesapeake Bay boatbuilding techniques and opening dialogue about the significance of Chesapeake Bay oystering past and present.

For more information on the Maritime Heritage Program, visit nps.gov/maritime. To learn more about Edna’s history, restoration, and upcoming tour, visit ednalockwood.org.

Spy Poll Results: Chestertown Overwhelmingly Likes Idea of Nonstop Public Transportation to Easton

The results of a Spy poll on public transportation is in, and the conclusions might surprise a few people.

In short, Residents of Kent County overwhelmingly support some form of public transportation to downtown Easton, based on an hourly schedule, with an average cost around $15 per ticket, departing every hour, and would be willing to do so more often if offered special discounts by restaurants or performance venues.

Over 170 Spy readers responded to the Spy poll posted last week asking Chestertownians if they would use a non-stop shuttle service between downtown Chestertown and downtown Easton for either work or pleasure. A summary of the survey is shown below.

1.  Would you use an nonstop bus shuttle from Chestertown to Easton?

2.   What would be a fair round trip fee for such a trip?

3.  Ideally, what schedule would you prefer if a service was offered?

4.  Would your employer help you cover some these costs?

5.  If traveling for entertainment or dining, would you be more likely to use the service if there were special discounts rates offered by restaurants or performance venues?

Qlarant Hosts Annual Grant Awards Event

Qlarant Foundation, the philanthropic arm of nationally recognized program integrity and quality company, Qlarant, has awarded charitable grants to fourteen Maryland and District of Columbia organizations seeking to improve health equity. Members of the Board of Directors for Qlarant Foundation held a reception for the 2018 Qlarant Grant Awards.

“Giving out these grants is so gratifying,” said Dr. Molly Burgoyne-Brian, Board Chair for Qlarant Foundation. “This is the 11th year that we have provided these grants to the community and each year it gets better. This year we’ve added four new grantees to the list of organizations that have received funds from Qlarant Foundation. We’ve now given over four and a half million dollars to fantastic organizations like these since 2007.”

Photo: Qlarant Foundation presented $385k to fourteen organizations: (left to right) front row: Brenda Crabbs (Qlarant Foundation Board Member), Sen. Addie Eckardt, Dr. Molly Burgoyne-Brian (Qlarant Foundation Board Chair), Deb Keller (VP Qlarant), back row: Robert Valenti (Qlarant Foundation Board Member), Amanda Neal (Qlarant Foundation Board Member).

This year’s grant recipients include previous grantees Access Carroll, Inc., Breast Care for Washington, D.C., Channel Marker, Inc., Community Ministries of Rockville, Help and Outreach Point of Entry, Inc., La Clinica del Pueblo, Maryland Foundation of Dentistry for the Handicapped, Miriam’s Kitchen, Mission of Mercy, and University of Maryland Medical Center’s Breathmobile. All of these organizations are dedicated to providing health and human services to underserved populations. First time grantees included Eastern Shore Wellness Solutions, University Legal Services, Inc., as well as Shirley Grace Pregnancy Center, Inc. and Girls in the Game; the latter two were honored for their commitment to women and young girls. Also attending the ceremony were Delegate Johnny Mautz and Senator Addie Eckardt. Sen. Eckardt presented citations to the organizations in her district.

During the luncheon, catered by Blue Heron Catering, the grantees were given the opportunity to present a summary of their organizations’ work and successes followed by workshops focused on partnership and networking.

“Our Foundation Grants Event is one of our favorite parts of what we do at Qlarant,” said Deb Keller, Qlarant Vice President. “Our ability to do the good work that we do and provide support for even more positive impacts to the community is what makes Qlarant so special.

About Qlarant Foundation

Qlarant Foundation is the philanthropic arm of Qlarant, a not-for-profit nationally respected leader in fighting fraud, waste & abuse, improving program quality, and optimizing performance. The organization was founded more than 45 years ago to improve health care and human services for all. Qlarant Foundation is focused on reinvesting in our people and resources to better support our clients’ missions. www.qlarant.com/about/qlarant-foundation

If you would like more information about this topic, please contact Glennda Moragne El at 410.872.9632 or email at moragneelg@qlarant.com.

Upcoming Events at St. Michaels Community Center

Plein Air – Kid’s Day Paint Out in St. Michaels – Tuesday, July 17th – 1:00 – 4:00 pm
St. Michaels Community Center will be hosting the Kid’s Day Paint Out in Muskrat Park. Registration is open and free for kids ages 4 and up for the Paint Out which will take place from 1-3 pm. Prizes will be awarded at 4:00. Kids can also participate in other art projects in various mediums set up in stations around the park. This event is free and open to the public. Pre-registration is requested to help with purchasing of supplies and can be made by contacting SMCC at 410-745-6073. Registration can be made at the park the day of the event as well. All kids that participate will receive a kiddie ice cream cone courtesy of Justine’s Ice Cream Parlour!

Talbot Idol – SMCC is proud to present Talbot Idol, held at St. Michaels Middle/High School
Auditorium. Auditions – August 4th from 9:00am to 4:00 pm.(You MUST call 410-745-6073 to schedule your audition time! – $20 entry fee). LIVE Competition begins at 3:00pm – August 5th (Winners are voted on by the AUDIENCE!) What a great opportunity to showcase your singing talent.

Prizes awarded for top Youth, Adult and Group performances. Tickets: $10/Adult & $5/student. Grand Prize is $250 plus Annual Grand Champion Trophy.

(funded in part by the Talbot County Arts Council with funds from Talbot County Council and Maryland State Arts Council)

National Night Out – Tuesday, August 7th – 5:00 – 8:00 pm – Bay Hundred Area Pool and SMES Parking Lot
The St. Michaels Police Department will be hosting the Inaugural St. Michaels – Bay Hundred National Night Out on August 7th with help from several local organizations. Come out and join us for this FREE event. It promises to be an evening full of free food, fun and fellowship! For more information, contact Marianne of St. Michaels Community Center at 410-745-6073.

SMCC is proud to present FREE Concerts in the Park all summer long!

Concerts in the Park – Thursday, July 12 – 6:30-8:00 pm – Muskrat Park, St. Michaels
Three Penny Opera – local crowd favorite!!

Concerts in the Park – Thursday, July 19 – 6:30-8:00 pm – Muskrat Park, St. Michaels
Bay Jazz Project – upbeat jazz

Concerts in the Park – Thursday, July 26 – 6:30-8:00 pm – Muskrat Park, St. Michaels
Chris Noyes – Bay Hundred’s own songstress!

2018 St. Michaels Community Center – Homecoming Dance – Sat, August 25, 2018 – 8:00 pm at St. Michaels Inn
The theme of this year’s Homecoming is “The Golden Age of Hollywood”. Live music will be provided by Radio City, dancing, lite fare, raffles, live auction and more. Our court includes Shawn & Marissa Carter, Laura Chance, Mike & Courtney Gorman, Kim & Bob Hannon, Helene & Ed Higgins, Peter & Lucka Paris, and Richard & Monica White. Each ticket purchased, or donation made in one of their names gets them closer to the crown!! Tickets are on sale now, $65 per person, or a reserved table of 8 for $600. Tickets are available by calling 410-745-6073 or contacting a member of the Court.

Watch our FB page for chances to win FREE tickets during the “Where’s Marilyn” contest!

Summer Youth Programs

We still have openings in some of our Summer Programs! Call today to register. 410-745-5102.

July 16 – 19 Mosaics – Join award-winning mosaic artist Jen Wagner in the creation of a mosaic mural. Participants will produce a mural of their design to become part of an on-going exhibit at SMCC. $95.

July 16 – 26 Acting Up – Want to sing? Dance? Act? This class is for you! We will learn the parts of the musical, Welcome to the Ever After, over two weeks and then have a show on Saturday, July 28th. No experience necessary! Grade 3 and up. $100.

July 30 – Aug 2 Summer Gardens – From Garden to Table, we’ll explore the world of gardening. Join us for a few field trips and hanging out in the kitchen creating tasty treats from the fruits and vegetable we gather. $95.

August 6 – 9 Artistic Expression – Do you like art? Like exploring different types of art? This program offers the opportunity to explore different art techniques and projects each day. We might even take a field trip or two! $95.

(Scholarships are available. For more info, contact Amy Dewitt at 410-745-5102)

Meet Courtney Crab!! She will be our model for the next Sip ‘n Paint with Josepha Price on August 10th from 6-9 pm. We will be painting on a crab basket lid for this class and the cost will be $40/person. There will be wine and snacks to enjoy! Come join us for fun, fellowship and painting!! Call today to reserve your basket lid – limited supply! This class is sure to fill quickly. 410-745-6073.

On-Going Programs

Every Monday (12:30pm – 2:00pm) and Wednesday (1:00 – 2:00) – Food Distribution
In order to help support St. Vincent DePaul in their distribution efforts, St. Michaels Community Center offers food distribution twice per week at our building located at 103 Railroad Avenue in St. Michaels. Open to all Talbot County residents. Must provide identification. Each family can participate once per week.

Every Wednesday – Senior Gathering – 10:30am
In partnership with Upper Shore Aging, St. Michaels Community Center hosts a Senior Gathering weekly. Beginning at 10:30 with games and activities followed at 11:30am for healthy lunch and conversation. Suggested donation is $2 per person.

Every Thursday – Mahjong – 10:00am
St. Michaels Community Center proudly announces Mahjong Play, hosted by Blue Crab Coffee on Fremont Street in St. Michaels. No charge. All skill levels are invited to attend!

Every Friday – Aunt Jeannie’s Soup Kitchen – 11:00am – 3:00pm
All are welcome to attend! Jeannie provides a hot, nutritious lunch every Friday at SMCC at 103 Railroad Avenue in St. Michaels. Menu changes weekly but is sure to please. Pay what you can, if you can! Eat in or Take Out available.

Back home on their Range: Quail find Refuge on Restored Grassland by Tim Wheeler

Dan Small, field ecologist for Washington College’s Center for Environment & Society, coordinates the Natural Lands Project, which works with private landowners to re-create Eastern Shore grassland habitat. (Dave Harp)

It’s a little past dawn on a foggy spring morning, but already the field on Maryland’s Upper Eastern Shore is wide awake. From the cover of tall grass and a few shrubs, a multilingual chorus of birds greets the new day with a cacophony of chirps, warbles and whistles, like a symphony tuning up before the concert.

Then, amid the familiar trills of red-winged blackbirds and other feathered regulars, comes a call rarely heard any more in these parts — bob-white! Down a lane across the field, the black-and-white striped head of a Northern bobwhite quail pokes out of some short grass.

Once commonly heard, if not seen, in brushy meadows and hedgerows, quail have become scarce in Maryland and elsewhere as farming practices have changed, eliminating much of the ground-dwelling birds’ habitat. This 228-acre prairie along the Chester River — part of sprawling Chino Farms in Queen Anne’s County — has become a refuge for quail since it was converted from cropland nearly 20 years ago.

“You really can’t go many places on the Shore and hear this many [quail],” said Daniel Small, an ecologist with Washington College, the private liberal arts college in Chestertown that uses the tract as a research station and outdoor classroom.

Bill Harvey, game bird section leader for the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, agrees, calling the number of quail there “unbelievable.”

“It used to be that just about everywhere was quail habitat,” Harvey said. But in the interests of cultivating crops more efficiently, modern farming has removed the fencerows that once segmented the land into small fields, along with shrubbery and weeds along the edge of croplands — all of which provided shelter for grassland birds.

“As time has gone on,” Harvey added, “the acreage has shrunk to the point where a lot of [the habitat’s that’s left] is not connected in a way that quail can use it.”

But at the college’s Chester River Field Station, switchgrass and waist-high bunches of broomsedge bluestem wave in the gentle breeze, an uncommon sight in a rural landscape dominated by vast uninterrupted fields of corn and soybeans, the staples of Shore agriculture.

A quail takes flight from the grasslands at Washington College’s Chester River Field Research Station on Chino Farms. (Dave Harp)

Quail use the cover of the tall grass and occasional shrubs to forage on the ground for seeds, leaves and insects. During mating season in spring, they call to one another with their trademark whistle and a series of other sounds. In the winter, the birds huddle together for shelter in groups called coveys.

Small, who lives in a house on the tract, said it’s not clear just how many quail inhabit the grassland, which occupies just a sliver of the 5,000-acre Chino Farms — owned by Dr. Harry Sears, a retired physician who’s on the college’s governing board. But “calling counts” conducted on a portion of the tract have tallied about 35 male birds in that immediate area.

Though the grassland looks wild and even a tad unkempt to the untrained eye, it’s actually managed to stay that way. In a rotation intended to sustain the grasses but vary their height across the tract, blocks of land are periodically mowed, sprayed with herbicide and set ablaze with controlled burns. Otherwise, shrubs and eventually trees would take over. While that would be a natural succession, the aim in this case is to retain a haven for wildlife that thrive only in prairie-type landscapes.

Though quail — a once-popular game bird — may be the most charismatic denizen of the Chester River tract, they’re not the only avian species that have a stake in the success of the grassland restoration. In essence, according to Small, they’re an “umbrella” species for lots of other birds that need similar habitat, such as the grasshopper sparrow and field sparrow.

Like quail, a number of other grassland birds are in decline across Maryland, according to the North American Breeding Bird Survey. At one time, as many as 80 nesting grasshopper sparrow pairs were spotted on the Chester River tract, Small said, but their numbers have slowly dropped over the years. On that spring morning, he said, he hadn’t heard a single call.

For the past few years, the college, through its Center for Environment & Society, has been working to persuade other Shore landowners to follow suit and re-establish some of the grassland habitat that’s been lost over the decades, in hopes of reversing those declines.
In 2015, the school teamed up with Shore Rivers, a nonprofit advocacy group, to launch the Natural Lands Project, a bid to make some of the region’s farmland more wildlife friendly while also enhancing water quality by establishing grassy runoff buffers and wetlands along streams and rivers.

With the help of a $700,000 grant from the state DNR, the project team has enlisted 27 landowners in Kent and Queen Anne’s counties. By the end of the year, it hopes to have converted 375 acres into grasslands, as well as another 36 acres into wetlands. The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation has kicked in $499,000 to create another 275 acres of upland habitat and 27 acres of wetlands, extending farther south into Talbot County.

“It’s not going to be for everyone, and we’re not trying to twist landowners’ or farmers’ arms to do this,” Small explained. “They have to want to create that change on the property.” But if someone has marginal cropland they’re willing to convert, he said, they can be compensated for taking the land out of production by signing up for one of the federal farmland conservation programs, with the project’s grant funding to help make up any difference.

Small said the team is most interested in working with landowners willing to convert at least 40–50 acres at a time, otherwise the habitat isn’t large enough to be really helpful. “You can’t expect to make a change in quail populations by doing five or 10 acres at a time,” he said. The project further attempts to create habitat on adjoining or at least nearby tracts, to create a corridor where quail can spread. The birds do not migrate or fly long distances.

Small said hunters are among the most receptive audience for the project’s habitat restoration pitch. They’d like to see Maryland’s small quail population grow and become more sustainable for hunting. New Jersey has banned quail hunting except on private game reserves, but it’s still legal to shoot wild quail in Maryland — if you can find them.

Harvey, the DNR game bird leader, said that while quail hunting has been restricted on public lands, wildlife managers have been reluctant to do likewise on private property because they believe it would undercut efforts to preserve and restore habitat.

“Just like Chino Farms and Dr. Sears,” Harvey pointed out, “a lot of the people interested and willing to take land out of production and spend the money it takes to manage for quail [are] at least somewhat interested in hunting for quail.”

Rob Leigh said that he and his wife Linda are still waiting to hear that distinctive “bob-white!” call on the 35 acres of farmland in Betterton that they turned into grassland and wildflowers 2.5 years ago.

Leigh, a retired dentist, recalls hearing the birds all the time when he was growing up on the Shore, and it’s what prompted him to place a portion of their 114-acre farm in the Natural Lands Project. He believes it’s only a matter of time until the birds take up residence there, as quail have been sighted just a few miles away.

Leigh said he was a little nervous at first about converting the cropland, which they’d been renting to a neighboring farmer to grow corn and soybeans. But the farmer found other land not far away, and Leigh said the lost rental income is covered by federal and grant funds.

Even without any quail yet, he added, they’re enjoying the sights and sounds of other wildlife on the converted cropland. “We see an immense array of different birds, of a variety I’ve never seen before,” he said. “The swallows and bluebirds, they just swoop up and down, they’re so fun to watch.” The patch of wildflowers planted in the center of the grassland has proven to be an insect magnet — drawing butterflies and so many bees that Leigh said they generate an audible buzz that carries across the field.

“I feel like we planted a prairie almost, it’s very lovely,” he said, calling the field “a kaleidoscope of color” in spring, first awash in yellow blooms and then hues of purple. “My wife loves it. She thinks it’s the best thing going.”

Timothy B. Wheeler is associate editor and senior writer for the Bay Journal. He has more than two decades of experience covering the environment for The Baltimore Sun and other media outlets.

Upcoming Programming at the Library July 23 to 27

Dr. Wayne Bell

Dr. Wayne Bell to Discuss “The Evolution of Beauty” at Easton Library

On Monday, July 23, at 6:30 p.m., in the Easton branch of the Talbot County Free Library, Dr. Wayne Bell of Washington College will talk about “The Evolution of Beauty,” the book by Yale’s Richard Prum that has thrown into question science’s traditional understanding of Darwin’s Theory of Evolution.

In its review of “The Evolution of Beauty,” The New York Times said, “Prum, drawing on decades of study, hundreds of papers, and a lively, literate, and mischievous mind, means to prove an enriched version of Darwin’s sexual selection theory and rescue evolutionary biology from its ‘tedious and limiting adaptationist insistence on the ubiquitous power of natural selection.’ He feels this insistence has given humankind an impoverished, even corrupted view of evolution in general, and in particular of how evolution has shaped sexual relations and human culture.”  The New York Times Book Review named “The Evolution of Beauty” to its list of “The Ten Best Books of 2017.”

Richard Prum is the William Robertson Coe Professor of Ornithology at Yale and Head Curator of Vertebrate Zoology at Yale’s Peabody Museum.  Wayne Bell is a Senior Associate at Washington College’s Center for the Environment and Society; he received his Ph.D. from Harvard.

All library programs are free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register to attend Dr. Bell’s talk.  For more information, please call the library at 410-822-1626, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Bill Peak, telephone: 410-822-1626

St. Michaels Library to Screen Animated Film

On Monday, July 23, at noon, the St. Michaels branch of the Talbot County Free Library will show an award-winning animated film, rated PG, on it big, professional screen.  All library programs are free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register to attend this program.  For more information, including the name of the film (which, due to licensing requirements, we cannot publicize here), please call the library at 410-745-5877, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Shauna Beulah, telephone: 410-745-5877

St. Michaels Library to Offer Story Time

On Wednesdays, July 25 and August 8 & 22, at 10:30 a.m., the St. Michaels branch of the Talbot County Free Library will offer a story time program for children 5 and under accompanied by an adult.  All library programs are free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register to attend this program.  For more information, please call the library at 410-745-5877, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Diana Hastings, telephone: 410-745-5877

We Are Builders

On Wednesday, July 25, at 4:00 p.m., the Easton branch of the Talbot County Free Library will offer a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) program for children 6 and older.  LEGOS, Zoobs, and more!  All library programs are free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register to attend this program.  For more information, please call the library at 410-822-1626, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Mike Rose

Contact: Laura Powell, telephone: 410-822-1626

The Magic of Mike Rose at the Easton Library

On Thursday, July 26, at 10:30 a.m., in the Easton branch of the Talbot County Free Library, professional magician Mike Rose will once again entertain children of all ages with his action-packed and utterly hilarious magic show.  All library programs are free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register to attend Mike Rose’s show.  For more information, please call the library at 410-822-1626, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Laura Powell, telephone: 410-822-1626

Easton Library to Screen Animated Film

On Friday, July 27, at 2:30 p.m., the Easton branch of the Talbot County Free Library will show an award-winning animated film, rated PG, on it big, professional screen.  All library programs are free and open to the public.  Patrons do not need to pre-register to attend this program.  For more information, including the name of the film (which, due to licensing requirements, we cannot publicize here), please call the library at 410-822-1626, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Contact: Laura Powell, telephone: 410-822-1626

Talbot Family Network Awarded Grant Funds for Families and Children

The Talbot Family Network, the Local Management Board for Talbot County, was awarded grant funds for FY 19 through the Governor’s Office for Children. The total award is $525,478.

The mission of the Talbot Family Network is, through collaboration with public and private entities, to identify and develop support systems for a safe, healthy, and caring community for all Talbot County children and families.

Through an extensive planning process undertaken by the Talbot Family Network (TFN) during FY 16 through 18 the needs of children and families were identified and gaps in programming were assessed by the TFN Board. The TFN Board is comprised of public and private representatives appointed by the Talbot County Council.

The programs and strategies funded by this grant include interventions for some of Maryland’s most vulnerable populations: families and children impacted by caregiver incarceration; disconnected youth between the ages of 16 and 24 who are neither working nor attending school; children and youth who are food-insecure; and youth who are experiencing homelessness. These interventions represent new pathways to opportunities and a push for systemic change that will further Governor Hogan’s vision of ensuring an economically secure Maryland for all.

In FY 18, TFN was one of nine jurisdictions in the state of Maryland, and the only jurisdiction on the Mid-Shore, to receive an increase in their award from the previous year.Those funds were then added to the total FY 19 budget.

“The Governor’s Office for Children recognizes and appreciates the unique role of the Local Management Boards in understanding the specific concerns of their communities and developing corresponding programs for children, youth, and families,” said Jaclin Warner Wiggins, acting executive director of the Governor’s Office for Children.

Executive Director, Katherine Sevon stated “Talbot Family Network is eager to continue supporting the success of all children and families in Talbot County through these valuable programs.”

For more information on the Talbot Family Network or the planning process please go to www.healthytalbot.org or contact TFN at talbotfamilynetwork@talbgov.org.

Talbot Base Funding: $525,478

Programs include:

Conversation on Race – Provides for two Beyond Diversity seminars on racism, equity and action for Local Management Board vendors and stakeholders. The creation of a community of practice will provide for a series of at least quarterly conversations and support sessions to foster a Racial Equity Community of Practice in Talbot County.  Beyond Diversity is conducted in partnership with the Talbot County Public Schools.

Healthy Families – A two-generation, prenatal through age 5 home visiting program for high-risk families that supports the development of healthy, stable, economically self-sufficient parents by capitalizing on the worker/parent relationship and leveraging this trust to engage the mothers in self-development and behavior change.

Community Nutrition and Gardening Education – Nutrition and gardening education for the community and coordinates with the Talbot County Hunger Coalition.

Healthy Habits – An after-school hunger and nutrition education program targeting 150 children eligible for Free and Reduced Priced Meals at two sites with research-based nutrition education and after school meals.

Mentoring Youth and Supporting Families Impacted by Incarceration –Provides mentoring including individual needs assessment, case management services and a trauma informed therapeutic support group for children impacted by incarceration of a parent. This year will add support groups for the parent/caregiver as well as family bonding events.

Bridges Out of Poverty/Getting Ahead Workshops – Educational and practical training provided to resourced and non-resourced community members regarding poverty and methods of moving out of poverty.

Reengagement Coordinator – Will identify and re-engage drop outs in an individualized educational program in partnership with public schools.

Career Pathways – A training program that provides engagement, pre-employment education, training, and career opportunities for disconnected youth.