Tim Murphy Jazz Piano at Mason’s – Redux 2017 on December 15

Tim Murphy, jazz pianist, will be at Mason’s – Redux 2017 on Saturday, December 15 from 6 to 8:30 p.m. playing sounds of the holiday season. Murphy has performed or recorded with Woody Shaw, Curtis Fuller, Charlie Rouse, Pat Metheny, and John Scofield and has performed on eight internally-released CDs. He hosted the “Morning Jazz Show” on WYRE in Baltimore.

Talbot County Department of Social Services Hosts Training for Foster Parents

Talbot County Department of Social Services (TCDSS) recently held a training for its resource (foster) parents on “Attachment Disorder.” The training was presented by Lesa Lee, Clinical Director at For All Seasons. To maintain their resource home license, each parent is required to take 10 hours of continuing education each year. Training topics are relative to the needs of the youth placed in foster homes. Recent training topics have included Trauma and Attachment Disorder, Drug Awareness, Grief and Loss, Working with a Complicated Child, and We are Family. Pictured left to right are resource parents who participated in the training: Carleen Mouly, Chrissy Montague, Coordinator of Option Respite for TCDSS; Jeff Scharf, Jeanne Scharf, Audrey Hansen, Emprin Wilson, Tyron Wilson, and Lesa Lee, Clinical Director at For All Seasons. The next Information Session on becoming a foster or adoptive parent will be held on Wednesday, January 9, 2019 from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at the Talbot County Department of Social Services, 301 Bay Street, Unit #5, in Easton. For further information, call the Talbot County Department of Social Services at 410-820-7371.

Compass Regional Hospice’s Ongoing Grief Support Groups

Bereaved Parent Grief Support Group — First Monday of each month; Dec. 3 and Jan. 7. From 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Compass Regional Hospice, 255 Comet Drive, Centreville. A drop-in group for individuals, 18 and older, dealing with the loss of a child. For more information, contact Rhonda Knotts at 443-262-4109 or rknotts@compassregionalhospice.org.

HALOS-Healing After a Loved One’s Suicide Grief Support Group — Second Wednesday of each month; Dec. 12 and Jan. 9. From 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Compass Regional Hospice, 255 Comet Drive, Centreville. A drop-in group for individuals, 18 and older, dealing with the loss of a loved one from suicide. For more information, contact Rhonda Knotts at 443-262-4109 or rknotts@compassregionalhospice.org, or Wayne Larrimore at 443-262-4108 or wlarrimore@compassregionalhospice.org.

Drug Overdose Grief Support Group — Third Thursday of each month; Dec. 20 and Jan. 17. From 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Compass Regional Hospice, 255 Comet Drive, Centreville.  A drop-in group for individuals, 18 and older, dealing with the loss of a loved one from drug overdose. Please join us for dinner and conversation/discussion. There also may be special guests or presenters to the group from time to time. There will be a special guest during the January meeting. For more information, contact Rhonda Knotts at 443-262-4109 or rknotts@compssregionalhospice.org, or Linda Turner at 443-262-4120 or lturner@compassregionalhospice.org.

All Losses Grief Support Group — Fourth Tuesday of each month. Due to the Christmas holiday, there will be no group meeting in December. The group will begin its regular meetings again on Jan. 22. From noon to 1:15 p.m. at the Caroline County Public Library, Federalsburg branch, 123 Morris Ave., Federalsburg. A drop-in group for individuals, 18 and older, who have experienced any type of loss. Please bring a lunch. For more information, contact Wayne Larrimore at 443-262-4108 or wlarrimore@compassregionalhospice.org.

Compass Regional Hospice – Care on your terms

Compass Regional Hospice is a fully licensed, independent, community-based nonprofit organization certified by Medicare and the state of Maryland and accredited by the Joint Commission. Since 1985, Compass Regional Hospice has been dedicated to supporting people of all ages through the challenge of living with a life-limiting illness and learning to live following the death of a loved one. Today, the organization is a regional provider of hospice care and grief support in Queen Anne’s, Kent and Caroline counties. “Care on your terms” is the promise that guides staff and volunteers as they care for patients in private residences, nursing homes, assisted living facilities and the residential hospice centers in Centreville and Chestertown. Grief support services are offered to children, adults and families of patients who died under hospice care, as well as members of the community who are grieving the loss of a loved one, through The Hope and Healing Center. For more information about Compass Regional Hospice, visit compassregionalhospice.org.

Stevensville Boy Donates Books to Compass Regional Hospice

Lucas Hetzel, 13, of Stevensville recently donated more than 700 children’s books to Compass Regional Hospice, to be used with the nonprofit organization’s support groups; through Camp New Dawn, a grief retreat summer camp for children, teens and families; and at the lending library, located at the Hope and Healing Center wing of the Hospice Center in Centreville, 255 Comet Drive, home of Compass Regional Hospice’s Grief Support Services. The lending library includes books, CDs and DVDs available to Hospice Center patients and their families, as well as anyone in the community who is in interested in finding information about hope and healing following a loss. For more information about donating to Compass Regional Hospice, please contact Kenda Leager, development officer, Compass Regional Hospice, at 443-262-4106 or kleager@compassregionalhospice.org. For more information about our Grief Support Services offered for free to anyone in the community who is suffering the loss of a loved one, please contact Rhonda Knotts, Grief Support supervisor, Compass Regional Hospice, at 443-262-4109 or rknotts@compassregionalhospice.org.

Compass Regional Hospice – Care on your terms

Compass Regional Hospice is a fully licensed, independent, community-based nonprofit organization certified by Medicare and the state of Maryland and accredited by the Joint Commission. Since 1985, Compass Regional Hospice has been dedicated to supporting people of all ages through the challenge of living with a life-limiting illness and learning to live following the death of a loved one. Today, the organization is a regional provider of hospice care and grief support in Queen Anne’s, Kent and Caroline counties. “Care on your terms” is the promise that guides staff and volunteers as they care for patients in private residences, nursing homes, assisted living facilities and the residential hospice centers in Centreville and Chestertown. Grief support services are offered to children, adults and families of patients who died under hospice care, as well as members of the community who are grieving the loss of a loved one, through The Hope and Healing Center. For more information about Compass Regional Hospice, visit compassregionalhospice.org.

“A Redd Christmas” with Chuck & Robert Redd December 16

The Church of the Holy Trinity in Oxford will present “A Redd Christmas” with Chuck and Robert Redd on vibes and piano. The event will be held on Sunday, December 16 at 3:00 pm.

Chuck Redd made his international debut when he joined the Charlie Byrd Trio in 1980 at the age of 21. That year, he also began performing extensively with the Great Guitars. With Byrd, Redd traveled around the world and throughout the United States. Robert Redd was born and raised in the Washington, DC, area, where he continues to base his musical career. He co-leads a group with his brother, Chuck Redd, and appears often as a free-lance musician at Blues Alley with local and national artists and is a current member of the Duke Ellington orchestra.

For more information please call 410-226-5134.

Tidewater Singers to Present An A Cappella Christmas

The Tidewater Singers will present an a cappella concert featuring Francis Poulenc’s “Four Motets for Christmastime” and other seasonal songs from the Renaissance through the 21 st century on Friday, December 14 at 7:30 pm at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Centreville; on Saturday, December 15 at 7:30 pm at Trinity Cathedral in Easton; and on Sunday, December 16 at 4:00 pm at Christ Episcopal Church in Cambridge.

Under the direction of William Thomas, The Tidewater Singers are a select group of professional and amateur singers founded in 2001. The goal is to bring varied and exciting quality choral music to the Eastern Shore.

Commenting on the concert, Thomas said, “The lyric melodies of the Poulenc Motets will delight our audiences, as will the span of the additional music.” The Tidewater Singers are renowned throughout the mid shore area for their a cappella work.

Now in his eleventh season as artistic director of the Tidewater Singers, Thomas is associate professor of music at Chesapeake College. Previously he directed the choirs at Easton High School and at Christ Church (Episcopal) in St. Michaels.

Advance tickets for the Centreville and Easton performances may be purchased online at www.tidewatersingers.org and at Cracker Jacks in Easton. Leave a message for Tidewater Singers at 1-888-752-0023 or tidewatersingers@gmail.com. Information and tickets for the Cambridge performance are available at 410-228-3161.

The Tidewater Singers gratefully acknowledges the funding it has received from the Talbot County Arts Council and the Maryland State Arts Council, an agency dedicated to cultivating a vibrant cultural community where the arts thrive.

Qlarant Wins 2018 ‘Top Workplace’ Award by the Baltimore Sun

Qlarant, the nation’s leading Program Integrity and Fraud Prevention firm, has been named to The Baltimore Sun’s 2018 list of “Top Workplaces” for the second consecutive year. The Top Workplaces recognition is based solely on employee surveys conducted by a national consulting firm, Energage. Qlarant employees evaluated the company on several factors including engagement, work/life balance, pay and benefits, and company leadership.

“The Top Workplaces award is more than just recognition, and isn’t something organizations can buy,” said Dave Morrell, a Qlarant associate. “We strive to attract better talent and experience lower turnover which means we are better equipped to deliver bottom-line results. Our leadership puts a high priority on a healthy, balanced workplace culture that supports employee engagement.”

“We are proud to be recognized by The Baltimore Sun as a Top Workplace for a second year in a row,” said Qlarant CEO Dr. Ron Forsythe, Jr. “We pride ourselves on having a culture that rewards a strong work ethic and teamwork, coupled with a healthy respect for work-life balance and sharing the rewards of success.”

Jonathan Haag, Dr. Ron Forsythe Jr., and Bonnie Horvath accept the Top Workplaces Award.

Qlarant touts nine offices nationwide, and has stayed true to its core values over its 45-year history. “We strive to help our clients make the most of opportunities and improve the quality of life for the people they serve,” continued Dr. Forsythe. “We have the same goals for our own Qlarant team members. By fostering a culture of excellence and commitment, we help ensure that the best people want to be a part of Qlarant, today and tomorrow.”

Part of Qlarant’s value tenants include:

Diverse expertise: By creating a diverse team with a wide range of experience and backgrounds, we are stronger and better prepared to face challenges and find success.

Leadership and promotion: We are dedicated to recognizing, rewarding, and developing associates in all areas—as well as identifying leaders and equipping them for growth.

Support and investment: We offer comprehensive training, professional development opportunities, management engagement, and timely feedback. Our goal: the best person in every position.

Commitment to excellence: Associates enjoy a welcoming and inclusive environment founded on excellence. Associates can be proud to be a part of the Qlarant team.

Work/life balance: We promote a healthy work/life balance through flexible scheduling, remote work opportunities, socializing, and celebrations.

Giving and giving back: We support our associates and their families through excellent benefits and encourage community involvement through volunteerism and local giving.

About Qlarant

Qlarant is a not-for-profit, nationally respected leader in fighting fraud, waste, and abuse—improving program quality, and optimizing performance. The company uses subject matter experts and innovative data science and technology to help organizations see risks, solve problems, and seize opportunities. Solutions are customized for state and federal agencies as well as industries across the nation. The Qlarant Foundation— the mission arm of the organization—provides grants to services provided in underserved communities. Qlarant employs nearly 500 people and has a 45-year record of accomplishment improving the performance of some of the Nation’s most important programs. Qlarant is a licensed AgileCxO Transformation Partner. www.qlarant.com

ESLC Hit It Out of the Ballpark on Giving Tuesday

 On Tuesday, November 27th, otherwise known as Giving Tuesday – the international day of giving that follows Cyber Monday – Eastern Shore Land Conservancy (ESLC) received a total of $22,177 on its website and through Facebook from donors supporting the organization’s conservation-based programs and initiatives.

“We’re incredibly thankful for the support and love the community showed us on this year’s Giving Tuesday,” said ESLC’s Director of Communications David Ferraris. “We started participating with this ‘holiday’ in 2016 and have had a lot of success with it, but hit a new level of support this year, especially in terms of involvement from new donors.”

ESLC was fortunate enough to have also had the support of seven local businesses that shared the group’s messaging leading up to and throughout the day via social media. Those businesses are Lyon Distilling Co., Eat Sprout, Solar Energy Services, Ebbtide Wellness Studio, Pop’s Old Place, Washington Street Pub, and Hair O’ The Dog Wine & Spirits.

Since 1990, ESLC has permanently protected more than 60,000 acres of land on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. The organization also provides planning consultation for land use and community design projects, environmental education, and climate adaptation planning for county governments.

Hogan Administration Announces Tax Credits to be Awarded to Restore Historic Structures

The Hogan Administration announced today that the Maryland Historical Trust (MHT), a division of the Maryland Department of Planning (Planning), has awarded five projects more than $9 million in tax credits to leverage more than $58 million in related project costs.

“The Heritage Structure Rehabilitation Tax Credit is one of the most effective investment tools for strengthening Maryland’s local economies,” said Governor Larry Hogan. “The five projects awarded this year will bring new housing, commercial, and arts opportunities through redevelopment across Maryland.”

The Heritage Structure Rehabilitation Tax Credit, administered by MHT, has invested more than $401 million in Maryland revitalization projects since it began in 1996. The investments have helped restore more than 4,709 homeowner and 693 commercial historic structures, preserving buildings that contribute to the distinct character of Maryland’s towns, cities and rural areas.

According to a study by the Abell Foundation, the program has helped to create an estimated 29,101 jobs through construction and new or expanded occupation of these significant historic resources.

“Planning supports historic rehabilitation while advancing community revitalization and economic development,” said Planning Secretary Rob McCord. “This funding helps encourage preservation and adaptive re-use of historic buildings and enhances the enjoyment of our state’s history, culture and scenic beauty.”

Seventeen applicants had sought $27 million in tax credits for construction projects totaling more than $233 million in estimated costs.

The five applications selected for the 2019 tax credits were based on an established set of criteria, including those outlined by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior for historic building rehabilitations.

The five award winners are:

Emerson Mansion – North Eutaw Place, Baltimore City
Seventh Metro Church – East North Avenue, Baltimore City
Visitation Frederick – East Second Street, Frederick, Frederick County
American Ice Company – West Franklin Street, Baltimore City
Ox Fibre Brush Company – East Church Street, Frederick, Frederick County.

Emerson Mansion – North Eutaw Place, Baltimore City
$1,000,000.00 in tax credits awarded
Estimated Total Cost – $5 Million

This large and exuberantly detailed Queen Anne styled, brick and brownstone mansion was built circa 1895 in the fashionable Eutaw Place neighborhood. The house was constructed for Captain Isaac Emerson who made his fortune with the invention of a headache powder known as Bromo-Seltzer. The structure was converted to office and institutional uses followed by vacancy which resulted in loss or obstruction of many of the building’s highly decorative finishes and features as well as deferred maintenance and vandalism that have significantly endangered the site. The rehabilitation of the mansion will reactivate this significant property to serve the neighborhood as a community resource center with an early childhood education center, community rooms and apartments on the upper floors.

Seventh Metro Church – East North Avenue, Baltimore City
$2,000,000.00 in tax credits awarded
Estimated Total Cost – $10 Million

Standing prominently on the corner of East North Avenue and Saint Paul Street is the Seventh Metro Church. This imposing Gothic Revival, stone masonry building, was constructed in two major phases. The rear section of the building, now called the Chapel (formerly the Immanuel Baptist Church) was constructed in 1882 and still contains significant Victorian features, such as decorative wood and plaster work. In 1905, a new building was constructed on North Avenue and became the main sanctuary space for the congregation. This part of the building is in keeping with the earlier chapel’s Gothic Revival Style and features lancet stained-glass windows, buttresses, and stone spires. The interior of this section dates to 1919 and is largely intact. This rehabilitation project will focus on preserving the structure, restoring the stained-glass windows and plasterwork, while also converting it into a concert venue and marketplace.

Visitation Frederick – East Second Street, Frederick, Frederick County
$3,000,000.00 in tax credits awarded
Estimated Total Cost – $15 Million

The Visitation Frederick campus includes several buildings that total approximately 55,000 square feet. The main building was constructed in 1824 as a monastery for the Sisters of Charity, who established one of Frederick’s first schools for young girls. Throughout the mid-19th century, several additions to the main building were added. The campus centers around an interior courtyard overlooked by covered balconies. Visitation was run by cloistered women in the Order of the Visitation, a Roman Catholic sisterhood, from 1847-2005 and then as a Catholic girl’s elementary school until 2016. The campus was also impacted by the Civil War when a portion of the monastery and school building was used by the Union Army as a hospital following the Battle of Antietam. This project will convert the school and monastery into a boutique hotel, restaurant, and wedding venue that will also feature apartments and the construction of new townhomes.

American Ice Company – West Franklin Street, Baltimore City
$2,449,260.78 in tax credit awarded, Note partial credit due to jurisdictional allocation limit
Estimated Total Cost – $13 Million

The American Ice Company building was constructed in 1911 as an ice plant to replace the supply of natural ice with a manufactured product. At the time of its construction, the building was one of the largest and most modern plants of its kind in Maryland. The company operated the building until the 1960s when they sold it to the Baltimore American Ice Company. The building continually operated as an ice manufacturing plant from 1911 to 2004, when a fire significantly damaged the warehouse and loading areas at the rear of the historic building. The building reflects the adaptation of a large industrial enterprise to a changing technological and social landscape, and over the course of the 20th century, the site saw several phases of additions to adapt to the ever-changing ice industry. Abandonment of the building along with the fire have left the ice plant damaged and endangered. This project will embrace the historic unique industrial character of the ice plant buildings while adapting its spaces to multiple new uses as an art gallery, restaurant and event space.

Ox Fibre Brush Company – East Church Street, Frederick, Frederick County
$632,840.52 in tax credits awarded, Note partial credit due to jurisdictional allocation limit
Estimated Total Cost – $15 Million

The original portion of the Ox Fibre Brush Company factory was constructed in 1892 to house a growing brush making firm that continued to expand and grow with new additions being added into the 1930’s. This company is a good example of the changes in manufacturing brought on by the introduction of railroad connections that allowed small industrial enterprises to rapidly expand into large scale manufacturing firms. At the peak of its operations in the 1930’s and 1940’s the factory produced more than 24 million brushes for sale annually. The plant was closed in 1966 when the company relocated out of state and the complex has since served as the home of Goodwill Industries. Rehabilitation of the complex will preserve the historic industrial character of the brick factory buildings while converting the spaces for use as loft apartments.

Renowned Speaker Nettie Washington Douglass at Foundation of HOPE Fundraiser

The Foundation of HOPE, a non-profit organization in Talbot County established to help women and young girls through economic development and empowerment initiatives, will host nationally renowned speaker Nettie Washington Douglass at their annual fundraiser December 8th at the Milestone Conference Center. The $60 tax deductible donation includes lunch and a copy of the book, A Narrative of the life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.

Ms. Douglass stated Frederick Douglass said, “It’s easier to build strong children than to repair broken men.” I am honored to have the opportunity to speak at the Foundation of HOPE event in Easton, MD on December 8th. On behalf of the Douglass and Booker T. Washington family, I commend the Foundation of HOPE for all you do to build strong children.

Haythe launched the Foundation of HOPE, a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization in 2016 to help Talbot County girls reach their potential. She started the Economic Development and Empowerment Program for sixth grade girls at Easton Middle School to cover such topics as: Building self-esteem, bullying, social media, workforce development, economic and community development, entrepreneurship, and financial literacy.

“Our mission is to help young girls lead productive lives in their communities by providing cultural, social, spiritual and educational development. We believe children are our future and we must prepare them early to be great future leaders,” said President and Founder Keasha Haythe.

The event also includes a silent auction featuring items donated by local businesses in Talbot County.

To register, visit Eventbrite. To learn about the Foundation, visit www.foundationofhopemaryland.org or contact Haythe at Keasha@foundationofhopemaryland.org or by calling 410-443-9936.