Talbot Historical Society Project Rewind: The Elmira Arrives at Avalon Island

Many thanks to Dave McQuay for sharing this 1903 Avalon Island photo from his Grandmother Lottie Covington Harrison’s Collection! The pictured boat is the Elmira which was built by Captain Syd Covington for his son Ruley Covington. The Elmira was the first gasoline powered boat in the area and the picture was taken on the southern end of the oyster shell created Avalon Island off of Tilghman, Maryland. Facts: Dave McQuay a descendant of Captain Syd Covington.

Contact: Cathy Hill cvhill@atlanticbb.net to share your old photos. Comment, Like our page and join THS!

Good Deeds: St. Michaels Foxy’s Helps Another Foxy on Jost Van Dyke Island after Irma

What started as an idea over lunch turned into a huge production and a community effort that surpassed anyone’s expectations.  One day last May, Will Workman, owner of the George Brooks House and Parsonage Inn B & B in St. Michaels was having lunch at Foxy’s Harbor Grille in St. Michaels, when an idea came to mind.  Located on the island of Jost Van Dyke is Foxy’s Tamarind Bar, the inspiration for the name of the restaurant in St. Michaels. Foxy’s on JVD is owned by an island legend, Foxy Callwood, a philanthropist, philosopher and troubadour, largely responsible for putting this island on the sailing itinerary of boaters from all over the world.

The bar began in 1966 (moved to its current location in 1968) as a place to share a “libation” after church where residents would celebrate successful harvests. Workman was a frequent visitor to the British Virgin Islands having sailed through the islands on his boat many times.  He approached the current owner of Foxy’s Harbor Grille, Terye Knopp, and asked if she had ever thought about bringing Callwood to St. Michaels.  She hadn’t, but thought it was a great idea. So, Workman, via email, contacted Callwood and his wife Tessa, and surprisingly, they agreed.  Saying they had no plans for September, and would love to come, they could use the opportunity to arrange some other visits to friends in the States.  Callwood agreed to play guitar, sing and entertain with his unique Caribbean style of music and storytelling combined.

A date was set for September, and an event was created.What started as an idea over lunch turned into a huge production and a community effort that surpassed anyone’s expectations.  One day last May, Will Workman, owner of the George Brooks House and Parsonage Inn B & B in St. Michaels was having lunch at Foxy’s Harbor Grille in St. Michaels, when an idea came to mind.  Located on the island of Jost Van Dyke is Foxy’s Tamarind Bar, the inspiration for the name of the restaurant in St. Michaels.  Foxy’s on JVD is owned by an island legend, Foxy Callwood, a philanthropist, philosopher and troubadour, largely responsible for putting this island on the sailing itinerary of boaters from all over the world.

Throughout the planning, one thing was clear.  The seating capacity at Foxy’s Harbor Grille would never be enough to accommodate the interest, as tickets sold out within weeks.  So, four shows were scheduled to take place over two days, September 12th and 13th.  A backup band was arranged to accompany Foxy, who is now 78 years old and has had surgery for polyps on his throat, and four sets would stretch his limits. The ticket sales profits would be donated to the Jost Van Dyke Preservation Society, the foundation that Callwood began, whose mission is to “… promote the conservation of Jost Van Dyke, its adjacent smaller cays and marine systems through education, research, restoration and, monitoring.”  Everything was in place.

Then came Irma.  Just a few days before the event, the catastrophic hurricane destroyed the majority of the buildings on the island of Jost Van Dyke with a direct hit.  Many of the surrounding islands that comprise both the British Virgin Islands and the US Virgin Islands were devastated. Without normal communications, the organizers Workman and Knopp relied on social media, a few text messages, and spotty emails to find out how Foxy and his wife faired, along with the other residents.  The good news was that they were ok, but the bar was almost totally destroyed.  They sent word via their assistant that they would not be able to get off the island to come to St. Michaels.  But, they requested the continuation of the event, turning the monies raised through ticket sales and donations into relief funds for the Jost Van Dyke Preservation Society. These dollars would now provide much needed supplies to help the islanders begin the long, hard and expensive task of rebuilding.

So, the event went on as planned and it was a major success.  Four shows – two on Tuesday, and two on Wednesday, with the band Trinidelphia from Philadelphia.  Guests were treated to a special Caribbean menu, exceptional music, dancing and ironically, lovely weather.  The money raised (over $12,000) will be hand-carried to the foundation’s accountant here in the states and will provide immediate help to the islands that so many here in this area have fond memories of.  One couple in attendance had just returned from their annual boat charter to JVD and had had dinner with Tessa one week before the hurricane hit.  Many of the guests travelled from out of state in the hopes of seeing Foxy Callwood, but were just as happy to party on in his honor and willingly donated their ticket costs for relief efforts.

The recovery will be long and arduous. If anyone would like to donate to the Jost Van Dyke Preservation Society, you can donate online at www.JVDPS.org. It is Workman and Knopp’s hope that someday, Sir Philicianno “Foxy” Callwood, knighted in 2009 for his significant contributions to improving the life of the people of the British Virgin Islands, can visit the bar that bears his name here in Maryland.

The organizers are planning to do this again next September in the hopes that Foxy Callwood can attend.

by Julie Imirie

 If you would like to join us in helping Foxy and those wonderful folks that live on the island, you can send a check made out to “JVD Preservation Society” and mail to Will Workman, Caribbean Nights Productions, 24500 Rolles Range Road, St. Michaels, MD  21663.  The charity is an approved IRS 501 (c)(3) foundation and they will mail you a receipt for your tax records.  For credit card donations, go to their web site:  www.JVDPS.org and the last section to the right is for donations (PayPal or your credit card).  If you have any questions, give Will a Call on (410) 829-0510.

 

Talbot Historial Society Project Rewind: Waits for the Race to Begin

The first unsanctioned Miles River powerboat race was 8 miles long and the early races included all forms of crafts including yachts and workboats. The first sanctioned powerboat race on the Shore was in Cambridge, Md. on June 20, 1911! Facts: ” Powerboat Racing on the Chesapeake” by William W. Mowbray 1995. Enjoy this Talbot Historical Society H. Robins Hollyday Collection photo of a hydroplane powerboat launching by crane at the Miles River Yacht Club!

Contact: Cathy Hill cvhill@atlanticbb.net to share your old photos. Comment, Like our page and join THS!

Spy Survey Results: Cut vs. Hire

Thanks to all who participated!

In our unscientific survey we found from our many responses that 70% always cut their grass with tractor or mower, while 19% never cut their own grass.

A full 2/3rds strongly agreed that they enjoy taking care of their own lawn; with, 51% strongly agreeing that they like driving a tractor.

Maybe best of all, regardless of whether you “cut” or “hire,” a full 83% report liking the way the lawn looks.

Numerous comments offered even more insights…some of our favorites:

“When I was growing up, my brothers got to mow the grass while I had to do housecleaning. I love mowing the grass, especially with my starts-in-2-pulls-of-the-rope Toro! I let my grass grow quite tall so that mowing it will be even more satisfying, and I sometimes play with making patterns as I cut. So much fun!”

“Husband sits on the tractor and cuts the fields and larger areas. Wife pushes the gas powered lawn mower around the trees and foundation plantings.  Both are happy with the outcome!”

“It is a peaceful time to be riding a mower trimming grass. Nobody bothers me with questions or whatever. I look forward to doing it every 4 days.”

“I grew up in a city apartment where I never learned to be expert with lawns or shrubs. I love the way our yard looks and could never hope to make it so nice with my lack of knowledge on the subject. I do my expert things and pay someone else who is good at their’s to do the lawn and all that comes with it. That helps make everyone happy and employed.”

“The best solution might be a herd of sheep but they are not as fast. See below”

Inspiration in our Midst: The YMCA Plans Bench Press Contest Honoring Dan Whitzel

Dan Whitzel was born in Baltimore, Maryland. As a young man, his Christmas present was a Y membership. Dan practically lived at the Y, lifting weights and building muscle, going every day. When he entered service in the Navy he found a Y wherever the ship docked and was training for the Olympics before long. In the 70s, Dan competed in the Mr. Maryland contest, missing first place by one point and securing second place.

Once he and his family settled in Easton, Dan became a member of the Easton Family YMCA. In the 1980’s Dan lifted at the Y and noticed a lack of equipment as he was working with a young man showing him how to do leg work. With the permission of Mr. Barton, the CEO at that time, they found equipment in closets and materials they could use to build squat racks. Dan started organizing weight lifting meets at the Y to raise money for more equipment and became the Chair of the Weightlifting committee. He helped the Y provide for the growing community of body builders and weight lifters. Dan has always passed on his passion for fitness by helping his children find their forms of fitness that they enjoyed. Not stopping there, he has helped countless young people develop routines based on their individual goals.

By far Dan’s biggest cheerleader in life is his wife Beverly, who has been by his side throughout every trial in their lives. They met in Baltimore when he was training to compete in a Mr. Adonis meet and she was competing in a beauty contest. At her brother’s suggestion she introduced herself but Dan was in the middle of a workout and when she said hi he practically ignored her. Beverly thought that was the end, but the next day he was at her door and they have been together ever since. They have been married for 57 years and have five children.

Dan, at 80 years young, had brain surgery this past January. He still tries to lift and though the weights are smaller, the commitment is larger than life. It is a passion he will have forever and he is very excited to see lifting competitions at the Easton Y again.

Spy Eye: Sailing Armada Descends On Oxford

The Spy can’t get enough of good sailing images and the 63rd Annual NASS race to Oxford this past Saturday provided excellent material, with 122 boats of various sizes race from Annapolis to just off the Tred Avon Yacht Club in Oxford. One of our Spy photographers captured the action all afternoon, including some exciting finishes with just a few feet separating the competitors. Racers and friends celebrated the perfect day for racing at the TAYC well into the evening.

Talbot Historical Society Project Review: Heads Off to School

It’s back to school! This Talbot Historical Society H. Robins Hollyday Collection photo was the”Star Democrat’s” Talbot Historical Society Mystery photo on February 28,2005. Our Museum database states the photo appeared in a Moton High School Musical Recital program from 1950 and the group identified as the officers of the Glee Club. The students are identified left to right first row: Minnie Green, Ernestine Brummel, Barbara Russell, Evelyn Hanson and Doris Leatherberry. The second row: Douglas Brown, Marvin Cornish, Chauncey Miller and Nathaniel Trott. The Moton School in the background appears to be the first Port Street Moton High School!

Contact: Cathy Hill cvhill@atlanticbb.net to share your old photos. Comment. Like our page and join THS!

Spy Follow-Up: North Street Garage Wins at Pebble Beach

This 1916 Locomobile Model 38 Collapsible Cabriolet was hidden away for over 80 years and is in remarkable unrestored condition. It was originally owned by Mary Ridgely Brown, the daughter of Maryland Governor Frank Brown. It took home the FIVA/HVA...

One of the Spy’s most popular article so far this year was back in May when we spotted an extremely rare 1916 Locomobile being brought into the North Street Garage to get a beauty treatment after sitting idle for eighty years.

Now the Spy has discovered that the same car just took home a prestigious Preservation Award at the Pebble Beach Concours a few weeks ago.

The 1916 Locomobile Model 38 Collapsible Cabriolet was not only hidden away for eight decades; it was formerly owned by Mary Ridgely Brown,  the daughter of Maryland Governor Frank Brown.

We hope the car comes back to North Street when it goes in for routine maintenance service in 2097.

 

St. Michaels Rotary Joins Fight Against Deadly Epidemic

“We’re in the middle of the deadliest drug epidemic in our history,” said Talbot County Sheriff Joe Gamble. “Much of it starts with prescription painkillers.” The problem is so serious that, according to Gamble, “your child has a much higher chance of dying from an opioid overdose” than from any other cause.

September is Talbot Goes Purple month, a substance abuse awareness program to engage our community and youth to stand against the scourge of opioid and other substance abuse. An initiative of the Talbot County Sheriff’s Office and Tidewater Rotary, in partnership with Talbot County Public Schools and Mid-Shore Community Foundation, Talbot Goes Purple is an all-hands-on-deck effort that everyone in our community can support.

Custom-made Giampietro Rampini bowls.

As part of the month-long awareness campaign, the Rotary Club of St. Michaels will host a Gourmet Pasta Dinner on Saturday, September 16, at the Christ Church Parish Hall, 103 Willow Street, St. Michaels. Tickets are $65 per person. Contact Mike Mabe by email (michaelmabe@atlanticbb.net) or phone (410-714-0466) to make reservations.

The mouthwatering menu begins with assorted crostini, followed by capresi salad, pasta with marinara sauce (meatballs optional), and a polenta/olive oil cake. Complimentary beverages (sparkling water, wine, tea, coffee) will be served throughout the evening.

Each diner will take home their beautiful pasta bowl (see photo) custom-made for this event by Giampietro Rampini of Gubio, Italy. Additional bowls will be available for purchase at the event.

All proceeds from the dinner will support Project Purple. For those unable to attend on September 16 but wishing to help, please contact Mike Mabe. Your generous gift of $35 or more will entitle you to receive a Rampini bowl.

Talbot Historical Society Project Rewind: Loving a Good Parade

Love a Washington Street Easton, Maryland summer parade! The buildings look the same but the businesses have all changed! This Talbot Historical Society Laird Wise Collection photo was taken sometime in the 1950’s! Enjoy comparing now and then!

Contact Cathy Hill cvhill@atlanticbb.net to share your old photos. Comment, Like our page and join THS!